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  1. Has anyone successfully made a DIY remineralizer like Jay's one but for sulawesi? I'm interested to know, because if possible I too would want to make my own, but if nobody has experience with it, I'll get the Salty Shrimp mineral for sulawesi.
  2. Hi Everyone, I was inspired to make the stainless steel immersion tubes found in the following thread: https://skfaquatics.com/forum/topic/9455-cooling-multiple-tanks/ I made mine with the following materials - x metres of annealed seamless stainless steel tube grade 316. Outer Diameter 12.7mm, Wall Thickness 0.9mm, ASTM 269. I got mine from Midway Metals in Sydney for $5 per metre. - A hand bender, rated to bend thin walled stainless steel. Got one from ebay for $99. - A tube cutter, again make sure it will cut thin wall stainless steel. I got mine from ebay for $32. For 60cm tanks I recommend 3 metres of tubing For 30cm tanks I recommend 2 metres of tubing Your hand bender will have an inherent bend radius, using this you can calculate the length of tube that you will use up with each bend whether it be 90 degrees or 180 degrees and pretty much how much tube you will need depending on your design. NOTES: I used 12.7mm tubing as you can then squeeze 12/16mm aquarium hosing on to it snugly (if you are paranoid use hose clamps as well). I also used 12.7mm OD tubing as its the maximum diameter you can get a hand bender for that is rated to bend stainless steel. Do not get thicker than 1.0mm walled stainless steel it will be a nightmare to bend. Make sure your stainless steel is annealed seamless tube this is specifically made for severe manipulation. This is for freshwater application only... the guys at midway said this would last 3 months in a saltwater tank lol. Good hand benders are each made for one specific diameter only, make sure you get the right one for your tube diameter. I am happy to post links to the ebay items if I'm allowed to. I'm pairing this with an Eheim 2213 and a Resun cl 200 chiller to chill 2 x 60cm tanks and ultimately 3 x 60cm, I'll update once this is done and give some feedback on the temp differences. I hope the info is useful.
  3. Hello, So I made this little tank and stand a few weeks back to go in my shed. It gets way to hot in here to have a normal co2 cylinder and I don't have a spare one floating around anyway, but I have lots of bits and pieces, So I made this: The reactor, Filter, night time shut off and proper needle valve to ensure the co2 level is constant and never rises. A diy wooden diffuser I made producing very fine pollen style bubbles. The only thing I would add if I could is a pressure relief valve, you can buy cheap kits off eBay that have one of these and a gauge, but this system doesn't seem to need it. Im also using a recipe I adapted from mycology research utilising sugars with more complex carbohydrates to give a more stable long term reaction, I started this recipe on the 28th of dec and it's still going strong. I had to remove the built in check valve from the other side of my needle valve (cause it's made for high pressure) it prevented co2 running to the diffuser at start up, and caused pressure to build up. I just used a standard air line check valve that requires less pressure to open and it's all working fine again. Atleast now I know standard airline push fittings hold up under the pressure, literally. I have used proper co2 tubing throughout, it's probably not needed considering this is a "constant" system but I had it laying around. The the solenoid valve which runs my "night time shut off" operates a bit different to a standard pressurised co2 system. I designed my solenoid on a T to the main line, It opens at night just venting co2 into the air instead of running into the tank, this is so pressure doesn't build up and wreck the whole system. My fav part is the diffuser TBH, I'm so fascinated by wooden diffusers. enjoy.
  4. Jarad

    Display setup complete !

    Hi everyone, After several days of work I have completed my shrimp display setup. As promised I will do my write up on how I built this, steps taken to during construction as well as recommendations for suppliers of those 'hard to get bits'. But as I am excited and proud of my handiwork I will drop a few pics here and do my write up later on in this thread :)
  5. This is the new and improved steriliser. its basically just 40mm pvc pipe end cap with spacers made from 40mm pipe. 2 wires connected to mesh close together in the water. Splits the H20 on a molecular level, pretty cool for how simple it is. Normal copper wire will work but it will dissolve within a few minutes, ive just used stainless steel BBQ skewers, these also worked well to just hang the whole unit from the side of the tank, and the stainless steel mesh from a tea strainer. Then air line tubing to prevent the rods touching, and some heat shrink to hold it all together, You just have to do tight connections like unless you have a SS welder, ? I'm just using 12v DC so in theory I could easily add a fader to control the intensity of the steriliser just like the fancy ones. I might do an actually write up on it later or something. For now I'm getting this bad boy in my zeb tank. its working great, now how long should I have it on for? Haha I was thinking starting at 15min per hour. Lol yeah it's pretty damn ghetto. Cheers
  6. Hi all shrimp freaks, I have been convinced by Disciple to start a shrimp rack build journal.....so, here goes!!!   I was an 'ol salty for a few years, but money put the mockers on that...after a hiatus I decided to resurrect my old 900mm cube and turn it into a planted tank......I love moss, so I decided to begin some propagation of a few types, whilst on my search for moss, I came across shrimp...BANG!!!!!!......I was hooked, dunno why, just am.....I bought a small tank with some Rillis of Gumtree, now its on for young and old....so, my thinking....   Basic design:   3 tiers of 900mm x 450 x 350 tanks with 2 Divs - a total of 9 tanks.....well!!!.... more is good right??? housed on a shelf rack I built for a clients shop some years ago..!!! A sump with matrix, noodles and some filter mat. each breed bay will have a sponge filter which I have modified to turn some K1 style media(H1 or something, from Aquotix). lighting - not sure, probably some 5w cool white flood lights!! I am pretty handy, being a trade,  but do have some heavy financial constraints from the 'social secretary' so, I'm having to experiment alternative products, buying overseas and eBay, so let me know where you find the margins please boys.......     I would welcome some feed back, so, let me know your thoughts on the set up      The Twisted Fishy....  
  7. fishmosy

    DIY overflow

    So here is my long awaited guide to making your own overflows. So, what you need: - Superglue - the liquid type is best in this situation, but you could use the gel type. - Marker pen - Scissors - mesh - more on that in a sec - Shroud - more on that in a sec A razor blade may also be handy for making the final incisions to tidy everything up, but forgot to include that in this shot. The mesh: There are several important things to consider when selecting your mesh (or the size of your mesh). How big are the shrimp you are keeping? There is no point in trying to use a 50 micron mesh for CRS as the babies are unlikely to fit through 250 micron. (micron refers to micrometres, or a millimetre divided by 1000. So 250 micron is one quarter of a millimetre). Remember smaller meshes will clog quicker so will need to be watched closely. Flyscreen is usually 1-2mm and nylon, so suitable for use as a screen for adult shrimps. Flyscreen is definitely not recommended if you want to stop shrimplets escaping out your overflows and (likely) into your pumps (often fatal). Above: 500 micron and 250 micron mesh respectively. For this example, I'll be using 250 micron screen. I've found 500 micron to be suitable for CRS and RCS, but 250 micron seems to be better for natives such as chameleons, which seem to have smaller shrimplets. So I have been using 250 micron screens on most of my tanks. I do find however that the screens need to be cleaned at least once a month to prevent buildup of algae, detritus, ect. If you use a nylon screen/mesh, you can use bleach/chlorine as a cleaner, 20ppm is an appropriate amount, but DO NOT LEAVE FOR MORE THAN 24 HRS as bleach seems to breakdown nylon screens if left for longer periods. If you have a buildup of salts or carbonates that can't be removed by chlorine, try a soaking in weak acid solution (after a rinse as acid and bleach react to form deadly fumes). Of course, remember to rinse your screens well before returning it to a tank filled with shrimp! The Shroud: It is just as important to consider the shroud that you use as it is to consider what mesh. The shroud must have enough open space to maximize the surface area available for the mesh. Less openings means less mesh, so the mesh clogs quicker. And clogged mesh can mean overflows, pump burnouts, angry partners, insurance claims, ect. ect. If in doubt, go bigger. The type that I most like (pictured below) are suited to screwing into bulkheads (which I prefer to use in any aquarium system) and have a good amount of open area but also plenty of area to glue the mesh to. I think you can get these at the two big hardware stores, but I get mine from a local irrigation shop for $3-8 depending on size. Here are two sizes, I believe they are 1.25 inch and 2 inches respectively. I'll be using the smaller size. The Process: The most important trick to this DIY is the use of liquid superglue. Mesh (being mesh) has holes, so liquids flow through it, including liquid glues. Here we use this obvious fact to our advantage. There are two ways of attaching the mesh to the shrouds. The first is to simply wrap the shroud in the mesh, add the superglue and trim when dry. The advantage of this method is that it maximizes the amount of surface area for the mesh to let water through = slower clogging. However I don't think it looks anywhere near as nice. So method two adds the mesh to the interior of the shroud. Step one: Cut a circle of mesh to cover the holes in the end of the shroud. On the end of the shroud is some casting marks. The inner circle is a good approximation for the internal diameter. Drop the mesh in. Then add the superglue only to areas where the mesh and shroud meet. If you don't add too much glue at one time, it will tend to flow only where the shroud and mesh meet i.e. where you want it. Step two: Cut the mesh for the side holes. Because the shroud is larger at the outflow end, the shape of the mesh needs to look like this: There are online tools that can help you find out the dimensions of your mesh by knowing the diameter or radius of the circles at the top and bottom of the overflow, which will give circumference (which are the top and bottom lengths of the trapezoid shape above respectively), as well as the height. However always leave extra as its easy to cut more mesh away, but very hard to join little bits on. I avoid the maths by wrapping the shroud in the mesh, trimming to get an oversize rectangle, and then carefully trimming down from there. However, this method does result in a bit more of the mesh ending up as offcuts. Add the mesh to the shroud and ensure it fits without too much of an overlap. Remember a double thickness of mesh (the overlap) will clog quicker. A 5mm overlap is plenty strong enough. So here I had to trim the mesh again as the overlap was much greater at the bottom than at the top. You'll have to look closely to see it. Once it fits in nicely, add the superglue only to the sections where the mesh and shroud touch. Here gravity is your friend as glue added to the top will flow vertically down the spine of the shroud without moving sideways into the mesh further than where the two touch. Step Three: Once all the areas where the shroud and mesh touch are done, leave it to dry (overnight), and then a final trim to remove the excess mesh. Step Four: Enjoy your DIY overflow that will never corrode.
  8. CNgo2006

    DIY Shrimp Tank Fans

    The Summer months can be particularly harsh and fatal for your shrimps. The temperatures reaching up to the 40 degrees mark depending on where you reside can spell impending doom for your shrimp. During these hot days you can see shrimp keepers around the world posting threads such as "Help shrimp dying!" and "why are my shrimp not active and pale"? The higher temperatures are an invitation for nasty bacteria and diseases, another factor is the shortage of oxygen in the water on those hot summer days. This article will show how to make a simple, cheap but effective way to help with the hot temperatures during summer, of course this is in no way meant to take the place of a chiller as chillers are always the best way to maintain a stable temperature during summer but this DIY fan should be used only as a means to lower the temperature 2-4 degrees ambient temperature, especially for those of us who reside in areas where the temperature does not get that extreme and can not afford a chiller as yet. Also an excellent cooling solution for Nano tanks! However for larger tanks I can not stress enough that when you can afford a chiller please do get one. So lets get started, firstly I will explain what parts are needed. 1. Wire Nuts x 2 2. Laptop Portable Fans x2 3. 240v to DC 5v 2A switching power supply 4. Wire Snips Now that we have the parts let's get to the DIY part 1. Snip off the USB parts from both of the fans, snip the jack off the power supply and expose wires with the wires snips 2. The fans will have 2 red wires and 2 black wires each (1 red and black wire for the blue LED's and the other for the fan motor), just join all red to red wires and black to black wires as they will all need to be joined to the power supply. 3. Now join the exposed positive wire on the power supply to the red wires on the fans and negative wires on the power supply to the black wires of the fans. (You can tell which is positive and negative by reading the back of power supply). 4. Screw wire nuts onto the exposed joined wires We are done! Now to test! (Note if it does not work then unscrew the wire taps and reverse the positive and negative wires) On my tests the original temperature of the water was 26 deg on my 40l tank, after approximately 40 minutes it had gone down to 23 deg and was at 22 deg after an hour 15 minutes. All parts purchased in this DIY was from eBay Portable Fans - $3 each, $6 for two. Power Supply - $3.10 Wire Nuts (50 pcs) - $1.50 Wire Snips - Free (had them already) Making a grand total of $10.60 for an excellent cooling solution! This is a very easy and cheap DIY, the result is a fan that will lower the temperature of the water by 2-4 degrees.
  9. The Summer months can be particularly harsh and fatal for your shrimps. The temperatures reaching up to the 40 degrees mark depending on where you reside can spell impending doom for your shrimp. During these hot days you can see shrimp keepers around the world posting threads such as "Help shrimp dying!" and "why are my shrimp not active and pale"? The higher temperatures are an invitation for nasty bacteria and diseases, another factor is the shortage of oxygen in the water on those hot summer days. This article will show how to make a simple, cheap but effective way to help with the hot temperatures during summer, of course this is in no way meant to take the place of a chiller as chillers are always the best way to maintain a stable temperature during summer but this DIY fan should be used only as a means to lower the temperature 2-4 degrees ambient temperature, especially for those of us who reside in areas where the temperature does not get that extreme and can not afford a chiller as yet. Also an excellent cooling solution for Nano tanks! However for larger tanks I can not stress enough that when you can afford a chiller please do get one. So lets get started, firstly I will explain what parts are needed. 1. Wire Nuts x 2 2. Laptop Portable Fans x2 3. 240v to DC 5v 2A switching power supply 4. Wire Snips Now that we have the parts let's get to the DIY part 1. Snip off the USB parts from both of the fans, snip the jack off the power supply and expose wires with the wires snips 2. The fans will have 2 red wires and 2 black wires each (1 red and black wire for the blue LED's and the other for the fan motor), just join all red to red wires and black to black wires as they will all need to be joined to the power supply. 3. Now join the exposed positive wire on the power supply to the red wires on the fans and negative wires on the power supply to the black wires of the fans. (You can tell which is positive and negative by reading the back of power supply). 4. Screw wire nuts onto the exposed joined wires We are done! Now to test! (Note if it does not work then unscrew the wire taps and reverse the positive and negative wires) http://shrimpkeepers...39909848517.jpg http://shrimpkeepers...39909848521.jpg On my tests the original temperature of the water was 26 deg on my 40l tank, after approximately 40 minutes it had gone down to 23 deg and was at 22 deg after an hour 15 minutes. All parts purchased in this DIY was from eBay Portable Fans - $3 each, $6 for two. Power Supply - $3.10 Wire Nuts (50 pcs) - $1.50 Wire Snips - Free (had them already) Making a grand total of $10.60 for an excellent cooling solution! This is a very easy and cheap DIY, the result is a fan that will lower the temperature of the water by 2-4 degrees. Click here to view the article
  10. andy-Eco-tank

    my set up

    Just like to introduce myself i'm Andrew and i'm in NTH QLD. i'v had tanks for sometimes now but am only running one at this time that i have built from the ground up over the last two years it's a 1200x450x450 tank on a DIY stand. happy to answer any questions you may have and enjoy the photos. Stand i made drilled and fitted 3x 25mil bulk heads DIY weir made from acrylic my 2ft sump running k1 Kaldnes media co2 set up all set up with a 150A chiller as well. Thanks for having a look.
  11. CNgo2006

    DIY Shrimp Caves

    Pretty sure everyone knows how to silicone rings together so won't be a step by step tutorial What was used was: Aquarium safe silicone or superglue Ceramic rings (choose an inert one and one that has a nice hole size for the specific shrimp you are making it for) I chose Mr Aqua M size. It is inert and quite porous for extra surface area (never a bad thing). You may want to look at getting the L size if you are making for large adult shrimp. Stick like a shish kebab stick to clear any obstructions that the silicone may have caused on the inside of the rings. They look quite nice I reckon, with moss on them will look even better! For around $15 you can easily make 10+ pyramids, go crazy and make them as big/small as you want, giant levelled pyramids or single logs, up to you! in this hobby we like to save where possible, so making these are a great way to save!
  12. Pretty sure everyone knows how to silicone rings together so won't be a step by step tutorial What was used was: Aquarium safe silicone or superglue Ceramic rings (choose an inert one and one that has a nice hole size for the specific shrimp you are making it for) I chose Mr Aqua M size. It is inert and quite porous for extra surface area (never a bad thing). You may want to look at getting the L size if you are making for large adult shrimp. Stick like a shish kebab stick to clear any obstructions that the silicone may have caused on the inside of the rings. They look quite nice I reckon, with moss on them will look even better! For around $15 you can easily make 10+ pyramids, go crazy and make them as big/small as you want, giant levelled pyramids or single logs, up to you! in this hobby we like to save where possible, so making these are a great way to save! View full article
  13. CNgo2006

    DIY Shrimp Safe Filter Guard

    These can be made to fit any size tubing at the fraction of the cost of what is sold and is so very easy to make. So lets get started! Note: It is recommended that you use protective goggles and gloves, as frayed mesh wires can get pretty sharp. Here is what you will need to make the filter guard: Stainless Steel Mesh sheet hole size #30 (can be purchased at the mesh company online, I got the A3 size sheet which is enough for a lot of guards!) Tin snips Heat Shrink (depending on the size of your tube get the heat shrink at least 5mm bigger, can be purchased eBay) Heat source (Lighter, hair dryer, heat gun, etc) A tube of the size required Pencil, marker Ruler Cable ties Craft knife Steps Prepare cable ties as you will need both hands free Cut mesh sheet to size depending on how long you want the guard and how thin the tube is (I cut mine 10cmx10cm) and wrap tightly around the tube, secure tightly with cable ties Cut another piece of mesh depending on the width of the mesh wrapped around tube (mine was 18mm), cut a square piece (18x18mm), place on end of mesh and bend corners over Cut a bit of heat shrink (mine was 2cm) and place over the mesh making sure the piece of mesh covering the end stays in place, leave about 0.5cm above. Using the heat source you are using (I just used a lighter) and heat the heat shrink until it shrinks tightly around the mesh (make sure you don't heat the same place for too long as it will melt! Just quickly run the flame over the shrink) and then quickly push the end down on a flat surface for a minute. The outcome should be something like this (you can use the craft knife to make the opening bigger if you wish) Now for the other end, repeat the steps above but shove the tube in instead. Leave for a minute or so. Remove the tube and cut the cable ties, cut a thin bit of heat shrink to place in middle of guard for extra support, heat it until tight. And there you have it, your DIY filter guard. For a fraction of the cost you can make all the filter guards needed, can be HOB, canister, overflow pipe, etc. for your 20 shrimp tanks!
  14. Squiggle

    DIY Air system

    This is a step by step guide to building an air system for anywhere from 10 tanks to 500 tanks or more, the only difference will be the supply pump. This system that I have runs 20 tanks with ease & there is plenty of air to spare for more tanks. First of all you will need a few things: Air supply pump, I'm using a Resun LP40 Heavy duty 13mm irrigation hose, I used 10m for this job 13mm T pieces 13mm L or corner pieces 4mm silicone airline, I used about 15m 4mm threaded taps 4mm irrigation tool I used heavy duty irrigation hose because it has a thicker wall & it will hold the pressure better & it has a tighter fit on the fittings Now I'm going to run the hose under the shelf above the tanks that it will be supplying, this way if there is a power failure then there's no chance of any water siphoning back down into the pump. First step is to measure the length & width of the shelves so you can cut the hose to the right length, then join the pieces together using the L pieces to form a loop. Make a loop for every shelf you have to supply air to. The reason I'm making loops is it balances the air pressure throughout the whole system. Once the loops are made, you have to decide where the supply is going to join the loop. When you know where the join will be you have cut out a small section so you can put a T piece in, I have chosen to put it down one end, the same end the pump will be. Next I secured the loop to the under side of the shelf with a multi purpose retaining device, aka Gaffa tape. Then I started at the other end of the system, I placed the pump where it will stay & started to cut lengths of hose to join it to the rest of the system, first I ran it to the upright of the tank stand then used an L piece & started to run it up to the loops. I then run a piece of hose up to the first shelf & used a T piece, I also secured the hose to the upright with Gaffa tape. The top shelf was the end of the system so I used a L piece there Once the whole system is joined together I started to punch holes in the hose with the 4mm irrigation tool & screwed in the 4mm taps, then from the taps I ran 4mm silicone airline to the air stones, sponge filters & the water aging drums, then I adjusted all the taps to have the correct airflow to each item. I also have two lines running full open all the time, this is to relieve back pressure on the pump. Another way to do this would be to have a small reservior made from 100mm PVC pipe, about 300mm long, between the system & the pump. When you have finished the system & you want to add another tank or air stone, all you have to do is punch another hole, screw in a tap, run the airline & adjust the tap to the correct flow. Hope everyone enjoys this & has just as much fun as I did building it.
  15. This is a step by step guide to building an air system for anywhere from 10 tanks to 500 tanks or more, the only difference will be the supply pump. This system that I have runs 20 tanks with ease & there is plenty of air to spare for more tanks. First of all you will need a few things: Air supply pump, I'm using a Resun LP40Heavy duty 13mm irrigation hose, I used 10m for this job13mm T pieces13mm L or corner pieces4mm silicone airline, I used about 15m4mm threaded taps4mm irrigation tool I used heavy duty irrigation hose because it has a thicker wall & it will hold the pressure better & it has a tighter fit on the fittings Now I'm going to run the hose under the shelf above the tanks that it will be supplying, this way if there is a power failure then there's no chance of any water siphoning back down into the pump. First step is to measure the length & width of the shelves so you can cut the hose to the right length, then join the pieces together using the L pieces to form a loop. Make a loop for every shelf you have to supply air to. The reason I'm making loops is it balances the air pressure throughout the whole system. Once the loops are made, you have to decide where the supply is going to join the loop. When you know where the join will be you have cut out a small section so you can put a T piece in, I have chosen to put it down one end, the same end the pump will be. Next I secured the loop to the under side of the shelf with a multi purpose retaining device, aka Gaffa tape. Then I started at the other end of the system, I placed the pump where it will stay & started to cut lengths of hose to join it to the rest of the system, first I ran it to the upright of the tank stand then used an L piece & started to run it up to the loops. I then run a piece of hose up to the first shelf & used a T piece, I also secured the hose to the upright with Gaffa tape. The top shelf was the end of the system so I used a L piece there Once the whole system is joined together I started to punch holes in the hose with the 4mm irrigation tool & screwed in the 4mm taps, then from the taps I ran 4mm silicone airline to the air stones, sponge filters & the water aging drums, then I adjusted all the taps to have the correct airflow to each item. I also have two lines running full open all the time, this is to relieve back pressure on the pump. Another way to do this would be to have a small reservior made from 100mm PVC pipe, about 300mm long, between the system & the pump. When you have finished the system & you want to add another tank or air stone, all you have to do is punch another hole, screw in a tap, run the airline & adjust the tap to the correct flow. Hope everyone enjoys this & has just as much fun as I did building it. Click here to view the article
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