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Showing most liked content since 08/26/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    After cleaning out my very mixed cull tank I found these few Blue cherry's that I plan on using as the base for a blue breeding program. I don't know how well it will work since they are from originally chocolate stock which I have been developing my black cherry shrimp from. But fingers crossed these guys breed true and enhance their blue. The various chocolates that are in this temp sorting tank will of course not be included in the planned blue program. Should this plan work? or am I better off biting the bullet and just buy established blue stock. I tired that once with yellows but they never liked my water and just disappeared, either by dropping their bright yellow or dying out.
  2. 3 points
    Here are a few more photos
  3. 2 points
    *** Its been a while so I thought I would update *** Progress has been slow due to the one and only tank builder here in Townsville taking 3 months to build the tanks! I finally have them and to say Im happy with the quality would be a lie! Bubbles in the silicon and massive chunks of it slathered everywhere... Oh well gotta work with what Ive got... - I drilled 35mm holes in each one of the tanks and was pretty stoked I didnt smash any! I took my time, kept it wet and used an El Cheapo Diamond bit from eBay that came in a set (shipped from Australia as it was here within 4 days). - I have purchased the Pond Pro Air lab EV60 from TheTechDen to run the sponge filters. I will review this once it is all set up. I have also started making a PVC airline with taps to each tank and will upload some pics as that progresses. I got 4mm irrigation fittings from my LFS as he has used them and stocks them as well. - Ive painted the shelving in a waterproof sealer and it looks ALOT better than the original dull brown. - Getting the plumbing supplies has been a bit of a hassle as Ive had to order most of it in (Bulk heads, strainers ect) but the supply shop has been great to deal with! - Ive set up the lights; 4 x 3ft UP Aqua U series for plants. I purchased these from Newbreed Aquatics closing down sale at an absolute steal as well as a whole heap of other stuff! I have no idea how Im going to keep them attached to the underside of the rack bracing as I dont think I can drill in to the light itself. So far I just have it tied up there with some black craft string (cant see it and it works). - Ive set 2 tanks up to start the cycle; they have the bulkheads and strainers attached but blocked off. The Substrate is Benibachi Shrimp soil, with a layer of Mironekuton powder. Ive done this purely because I have a whole heap of Blue Dreams and Neon Yellows hanging off the front of another tank in Sudo Breeder boxes. Thanks for following the build. Once Ive completed more of it, I will update with details and plans as well from the Air System, Plumbing and parts lists ect.
  4. 2 points
    Thought I'd start to post some pics and updates of the progress and some of the steps along the way incase it helps anyone to learn from my mistakes and successes. Below is a pic of the room as it is now (very ad hoc) and also the materials we're using to build the new tables and shelves. We are using atructural pine for support including lengths along the base of the tables to spread the load with 25mm "eco" ply benchtops. Dressed pine shelves for misc frequently used items and to mount the lighting as well as to support waterchange dripping buckets. The waterchange method my friend and I have come up with (mostly him) is pretty neat and I'll share the details of how that will work later. The end result will house 12ร— 60 litre tanks and 2x 90 litre tanks all of which will be divided into two sections. I will be using a combination biospon and the standard style air driven sponges for filtration - all biospon will be driven by one larger pump hidden away supplied by a large airline around the perimeter and a smaller pump for each table to supply air to the oldschool sponges to ensure filtration and aeration incase of mechanical failure. [emoji173][emoji111][emoji445] will
  5. 2 points
    Atop her palace.. [emoji173][emoji111][emoji445] will
  6. 2 points
    Some of the aquarium dividers are installed and I'm pretty happy with how they are looking. We've used some small PVC tube with a slot cut in the middle to anchor and support the 2mm acrylic sheet as well as using the little plastic clips at the top (they came with the aquariums as supports for the lid). We have left a gap of around 23mm at the bottom and i will layer it up high with some fairly chunky gravel in the middle where the divisions are to allow enough flow to keep WP fairly well matched in both sections. LED controller has been built and we Have also finished 3/4 draining and moving out all of the smaller tanks into the room next door while we install shelving and modify the built in robe. Tanks have been filled back up with fresh remineralised RO and the shrimps seem to have handled the move OK and I haven't detected any spikes in parameters. Some shrimps in my yellow colony seem a little paler than I had thought but I think they'll bounce back alright. [emoji173][emoji111][emoji445] will
  7. 2 points
    I know it's going to be a shame to blemish them with the dividers but it's the most efficient way I've decided that I'll be able to do selective breeding without stressing the shrimps having to move them from tank to tank! I also want to dedicate one or two other seperate tanks for oddbods plus those shrimp that I just can't quite bring myself to cull as well as a few of my nicer shrimps popped in there as an insurance policy. The dividers will have no windows with mesh - I will just have 2mm acrylic dividers but with a gap at the bottom of 3cm and a 5cm layer of fairly chunky dark gravel either side of that spanning out 10cm and then a shallower later of either buffering substrate or plain old pool filter sand depending on the tank. I hope that should provide enough circulation. There will be a total of about 400-600 lph of airflow going into the sponges to circulate each tank. I've attached the rough plan for the LEDs here now. The electronics side of it will probably be finished soon. Things are really moving pretty quickly can't wait till the rest of the tanks are ready. Shrimps I will keep (What I already have) - Blue dream Blue body red rili (work in progress) Yellow cherry Bloody Mary Crs Green babaulti Blue dream Tangerine tiger Shrimps I would like to add - Shadow panda Caridina zebra Sulawesi cardinal Mid-dark blue oebt Inverts I have but have not made allowance for (mainly because I don't want to put massive tanks in this room where I'm not sure the floor might cave in and as a result will need to beg the minister of finance to allow me to have 2 tanks in the lounge again) - Macrobrachium Australianese Yabbies (cherax destructor) At this point without naming anyone because the list would be too long I'd like to thank all of the wonderful people in the shrimp keeping community who have helped me to get to the point I'm at now i have learnt a lot in the last 2 and a half years or so since I first signed up on skf. You all know who you are - thank you !!![emoji173] [emoji173] [emoji173] [emoji173][emoji111][emoji445] will
  8. 2 points
    ... [emoji173][emoji111][emoji445] will
  9. 1 point
    That's why I prefer our way of doing it, rather than using fancy names that breeders come up with we use the actual lineage in describing the colour. Fancy names do nothing but create more confusion in the hobby when you have a shrimp like the cherry that has multiple paths to the same colour.
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    No kids to worry about mate, although I do have Pugs! That like to try to climb the rack and chew dangly things like power cables! I will definitely upload progress pics as I go with the plants. Might give one a Flame moss Mohawk!
  12. 1 point
    yuk! Could not watch any shrimp in such a tank: I would have the feeling somebody's watching me o.O
  13. 1 point
    The shrimp I took back into my shrimp room tanks are doing well. The blue is becoming more consistent but still too many variable blues at this stage. I am still getting chocolates and blacks with the occasional Bloody Mary .
  14. 1 point
    We are currently in the process of writing the paper that will describe these as a new species. DNA and morphology confirm it's definitely a new species.
  15. 1 point
    Exciting mate! Ready for the virtual tour!
  16. 1 point
    Hahaha you got it pal! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  17. 1 point
    Any News on taxon? I was just reading Choy & Marshall's 1997 paper on C. confusa, because what else do you do at 1:30am, and in which they hypothesize the split of C. zebra and C. confusa. Colour and patterning is said not to be definitive as plain coloured shrimp populations exist within the Zebra morphology. the rostrum is the most obvious difference and one of the few you can pick on live shrimp. The rostrum on these Caridina sp. 'malanda' does look zebra like and as you have kept both shrimp do you think they are similar? i ask as i have just collected some shrimp from near Milla Milla that look similar to these
  18. 1 point
    the spinipes are growing rapidly reached 5cm in as many weeks, the tolmerum females are berried again waiting to see if any bubs survive as they drop larvae, the jardini and bullatum are growing still and the Aus are grumpy as normal lol.
  19. 1 point
    So it took me all day to finally remove the mishmash of cull cherry shrimp from the tank we call "Blue Guppy tank" even though it also houses khuli loaches (both striped and black) dwarf chain loaches and breeding bristlenose catfish and of course blue guppys. I had to totally strip the tank, but at least I am 99% sure I have removed every single shrimp. The plan is to only put back the few blue cherry shrimp I found. Put the chocolates into my 4ft cory tank that only has the corydoras, otocinclus, Borneo Suckers, threadfin rainbows, fly specked hardyheads, dwarf neon rainbows and some riffle shrimp. This tank is very heavily planted so much so I almost never see the riffles and probably only 1/2 of the corys at any given time. The rest of the wild type cherry's can take their chances in the pond with the endlers and gudgeons, and maybe give some away to a person I know who will probably breed them as live food for his cichlids. The blacks that don't meet the grade of my black cherry shrimp tank will go into the huge tank we call the "freebie tank" (it was free) and is actually the grow out and cull spot for non-blue guppies and bristle nose fry. The next time I have a day to play in the tanks I will sort the 50L red cherry shrimp tank, but I have to be more careful with this tank since it also is home to nerite snails. Then when I am feeling really productive I'll hit the other 4ft tank removing all the rainbows and endlers and just leave the BN's, sterbia corys, dwarf chain loaches and have a long hard think about what species of peaceful non shrimp eating fish I will add that wont breed like wild fire. So far I am leaning towards putting my Pacific Blue Eyes into this tank from their current abode with the Black cherry shrimp and putting another species of Blue Eye into the Black cherry tank. With the 4ft less the rainbows I am thinking of putting my high grade red cherry shrimp so I can down size in one tank. Which will be WOW from 7 down to 6 tanks but still a very handy pond as a back up.
  20. 1 point
    Nice, I had some pretty good blues and blacks from my old choc colony.
  21. 1 point
    Yes, I do. Dechlorinated tap water in Metro areas is perfect for cycling a new tank. I'm going to drain the tank after the cycling is complete and fill with RO water and bring parameters up to suit the tank inhabitants anyway. So why waste RO water in a cycling tank. RO water is usually low in pH to start of with, so that doesn't help the BB multiply.
  22. 1 point
    Yep that will stall the nitrogenous cycling process. Use dechlorinated tap water while cycling the tank, that should give the pH a bump. And since the tank has no inhabitants yet, dissolve some bicarb soda (not baking soda) and add it if you see pH dropping below 7. Normally, I wouldn't have to resort to bicarb soda, tap water should be enough to maintain pH. But you seem to need the stronger stuff.
  23. 1 point
    Ok all. Got half a dozen CRS That I've got in my office tank. And they have been living happily for a while whilenow.it's hard to see if they are getting berried. But so far no fry. Water parameters are good. I'll do a test tomorrow and post the results Doing regular water changes etc. Mainly looking for ideas of little things to check to see if I can get love flowing Photos just for the hell of it
  24. 1 point
    Hi, I am new to this forum so apologies if I have put this thread in the wrong section. I've been keeping fish/shrimp for years (Mainly Amano). Recently I decided I wanted to try and keep RCS and breed them. It's my first time trying to breed them, so I just was really looking for some tips and whether my set up is suitable or not. I have a 25L (5Gallon) tank, which is quite small. I have the water temperature around 26/27Degrees and have a Dennerle corner filter which I read was a fairly good filter for shrimp. (I appreciate that I may need a sponge filter instead). I have a carpet (looks like grass but cannot remember the name) with crypts growing in the back ground. I have 3/4 bits of woods that forms a sort of fortress which also has 2 types of wood hugging plants growing. I was using C02 and Fertilisers to get the plants to grow but stopped around a week before the shrimp were placed in. I have 10 cherry shrimps. Anything that you think i'm doing wrong or think I should be doing, please feel free to tell me. How will I know when my shrimps are pregnant? Thank you, Tyler
  25. 1 point
    I think I may have worked out how to resize but its going to make a mess of my desktop temporarily posting pic to it. so here goes
  26. 1 point
    Hello Everyone, Thanks for including me in your shrimp group. My husband and I live in North Bend, OR, which is near the coast. It is cool and rainy most of the year, which makes it harder to ripen tomatoes, but easier to grow lettuce... Except for the slugs and snails! My childhood was in N. Carolina, where I spent many happy hours playing in the creek collecting mosquito fish and tiny crayfish. I learned to my dismay (when I added some to my 10 gallon) that mosquito fish are rude fin nippers and don't make peaceful community tank members. I had a stroke 10 years ago at age 47 from a car wreck and have been left side paralyzed since then. However, my patient husband helps me with my aquarium projects. I have 2 tanks, both freshwater planted, a 14 and a 55 gallon. We have hard, high pH well water, so that has been a challenge. I would really like to get some Cardinal Sulawsi Shrimp, since I hear they like those water conditions. However, they are expensive and hard to find. Anyway, I welcome any suggestions and want to keep learning.
  27. 1 point
    I Agree with advice offered above but would add that in the many many years I have been breeding Neo's I have not found 24-25c to be stressful to them, in fact I find it to be less so (in Brisbane anyway) the swing from nighttime and daytime temps is less. I find the cost of a chiller ($300+) to be unnecessary.
  28. 1 point
    Hello all, I'm Nate all the way from Cape Town SA! I really could not wait to post hear after all I have read and experienced since starting with shrimp a couple of years ago. First had some cherries 50, CBS - 40 & CRS - 50 until my niece opened up my co2 and gassed all my shrimp. Was that a nightmare [emoji22] I knew I was playing with danger having co2 and shrimp but it was working for a while. So about two years after that which was the beginning of August 2017 I finally started a 60lt dedicated for CRS. So here we go with some specs, Size - 60lt Substrate - ADA Filtration - sponge filters Readings; PH 6.6, kh 1, GH 4 Temperature - 23 degrees Plants Susswasertang Fissidens Bucephelandra melawi Frogbit Natural additions Catappa leaves, bark Alder cones Some pictures of setup, Please let me know if I need to change anything! Thanks Nate Sent from my VKY-L29 using Tapatalk
  29. 1 point
    Hi Tyler A couple of things with your setup. Drop the temp down to 21-22 C. Any filter is fine as long as the shrimpetes, that are tiny, do not get sucked up into it. CO2 is still ok to run but at a reduced rate, just watch to see if the shrimp are heading for the surface. They prefer a well O2 tank and that can be conflicting with CO2 as you get a lot gassing off if you have an air stone or heavy surface agitation. Ferts are ok in smaller doses but must have no to very low copper content. Shrimp get saddled, where the eggs are inside of the shrimp and look like a horse saddle, mate and then transfer the eggs to under their tail, Berried. Depending on how transparent the shell is you may see the saddle. You will see the berried phase. Good luck and happy shrimping.
  30. 1 point
    Excellent. A TDS meter is a very handy tool to have. 130-140 is perfect for CRS. pH 6.2 for CRS is also a good reading for CRS. Looks like you just need to feed the shrimp a variety of foods and wait for them to breed.
  31. 1 point
    Hi. Unfortunately I no longer have the set up. But I did have it long enough to know that it was working very well. The reason I stopped was cause I moved back to NZ from Malaysia. Maybe I will start up again over here when I have a bit more space. But I found this kind of setup worked quite well for me and was not expensive at all to set up. I built the pressurised canister filters myself from plastic tubs & PVC pipe. Then used standard filter media to fill them up. I had 4 females and 1 male most of the time in the smaller blue tub so they could mate in peace away from the chaos of the main tank. Then once the females had eggs I would shift them to the glass aquarium. After 3 females had eggs I had over 200 crays which most survived and I sold. I simply didn't have anywhere to keep that many as they grew up quite fast.
  32. 1 point
    I've not had an aquarium for some time, ab1 out three years. I saw NoGi selling a Disposable Co2 Regulator, I decided then and there that I would purchase his Co2 Regulator and set-up a brand new tank. - So Thank-You NoGi :P The plan is to set-up an ADA Style cube, plant it out, and stock with some Reasonable Quality CRS, some Boraras Brigittae & a few Otocinclus... I will update this post as I acquire more items, and update the thread with images of any progress made. Please feel free to make any suggestions, ask any questions you may have, or even post images of planted cubes that look awesome as I need much inspiration :p Cheers, John. ______ Purchased: Mr Aqua - Low Iron 30cm Cube. Chihiros Aquasky LED Glass Lilypipe Set Glass CO2/PH Checker CO2 Regulator CO2 Solenoid. CO2 In-Line Atomiser ADA Amazonia Powder To Buy: Eheim 2213 & Clear Hose. CO2 Hose CO2 Buble Counter. Hydor 200w In-Line Heater Hardscape Materials - Wood/Rock Plants & Moss - Tissue Cultured Shrimp & Fish. Power Boards, Timers, Etc. To Make: ADA Style Stand.
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    Hi @NatefromSa, nice natural looking tank. Your shrimps look pretty happy in there. I wouldn't change a thing. ๐Ÿ‘
  35. 1 point
    With so many dedicated new members, and the mountain of information, I thought I'd summarised my 6 most critical water parameters I frequently test, to ensure my shrimps have the best possible water quality. GH (General Hardness) GH is the measure of Magnesium (Mg+) and Calcium (Ca+) ions in water. Water described as รขโ‚ฌล“softรขโ‚ฌ or รขโ‚ฌล“hardรขโ‚ฌ is in reference to GH. GH is measured in dH, and 1 dH is approx.. 17.5mg/L (ppm) 0-4 dH (Very Soft) 4-8 dH (Soft) 8-12dH (Medium hard) 12-18 dH (Fairly Hard) 18-30 dH (Hard) KH (Carbonate Hardness) KH is the measure of carbonates and bicarbonates in water. KH measure the alkalinity (buffering capacity resulting in the resistance of a PH fluctuation). KH is measured in dH, and 1 dH is approx.. 17.5mg/L (ppm). The higher the KH the more stability and resistance PH will fluctuate. pH (Per Hydrogen) pH is the measure of the balance of Hydrogen (H+) and Hydroxide (OH) ions in water. The pH scale goes from 0-14. pH reading of 7.0 is neutral, 0-6.9 is Acidic, and 7.1-14 is alkaline. pH is also a function of KH and CO2 concentration. Nitrates Nitrates are critical to our beloved shrimps, and often utilized to indicate the level of water quality once a tank is cycled. Nitrates between 0-20ppm should be our goal. Nitrate should be tested/checked frequently, as high nitrates can/will lead to shrimp deaths even weeks after the event. TDS/Ec TDS (Total Dissolved Solids)/ Ec (Electrical Conductivity) is essential to ensure overall purity of water. A TDS reading measures contaminants , but also minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and other trace elements and metals. The TDS reading of most natural clean spring water is approx. 100-200 ppm. RO (Reverse Osmosis) water will have approx. 0 TDS, and by adding essential salts/minerals to the required TDS/Ec,, this will ensure our shrimps have the purist of water with the right/essential minerals. http://www.shrimpkeepersforum.com/forum/showthread.php/3078-Dean-s-(Ec)-vs-BlueBolts-(TDS) Temperature Water temperature is a critical factor, and depending on the type of shrimp, a higher/lower range can be tolerated, but does add stress to the shrimps. Ensuring no sudden fluctuation, and maintaining the recommended level will ensure the best survival/breeding zone for our shrimps. There are many breeders using varying WP (i.e. soft water vs hard water, low PH vs high PH...etc)...please do your research and/or ask the forum members of their experience/knowledge, depending on the shrimp species you intend keeping.
  36. 1 point
    Now that it looks like summer is on its way and my rainbows in my 4ft tank are getting huge I am seriously planning on relocating them and the endlers down to my 1000L pond to live out their days. They will be joining endlers all ready in the pond along with notopala snails, cull cherry shrimp and from memory purple spot and empire gudgeons.That will leave just a couple of BN's a mob of sterbia corys and around 15 dwarf chain loaches in the 4ft. I was planning on putting my Pacific Blue Eyes into the tank from the 2ft black cherry tank, but that would leave just the 2 whiptails, nerites and black cherry's in the 2ft tank. So I am looking for a suitable safe fish to put back into the 2ft tank that wont bother the shrimp but will stop dragonfly nymphs being able to invade the tank, which has happened previously when no fish where with the shrimp. Hence the useful and pretty Pacific Blue Eyes. I really like Blue Eye species and already have Spotted Blue Eyes in my native shrimp tank, and could order either Delicate Blue Eyes or Neon Blue Eyes for the tank although I would really love some Honey Blue Eyes. I could put threadfin rainbows in but I already have some in one of my other 4ft tanks and if possible I would prefer to not double up on species between different tanks. I did try Rasbora maculata at one time but they just failed to thrive. So requirements.... 1. Available in Central Queensland or from sources that will ship. eg Aquagreen, Livefish 2. Shrimp friendly, nonaggressive 3. Snail friendly (leave the nerites alone) 4. tolerant of heat, the shed and tanks get pretty hot in summer. 5. Wont breed to EXTERME 6. Prefer to not have a fish that will eat destroy the plants. I know I could just leave a mob of male endlers in the tank, but I really want to have a school/ shoal of nice peaceful fish that wont harass the shrimp, snails or whiptails. I even considered cross banded danios but I'm not really sure how shrimp safe they would be. I will probably even be looking for a suitable fish for my 50-60L tank that currently only houses red cherry shrimp and nerite snails in the near future too. So suggestions please......
  37. 1 point
    @Baccus , don't use photobucket, they don't let you share outside of their network now unless you pay them for a subscription. Upload them here.
  38. 1 point
    Hi Heidi, welcome to the forum. I know Dave from Aquagreen sells the native nerites Neritina violacea. Check out their catalogue here: http://www.aquagreen.com.au/catalog.html This is a short write up on the Neritina violacea: http://www.aquagreen.com.au/plant_data/Neritina_violacea.html Very keen if you have any to spare together with the c. wilkinsi when you are able to source them.
  39. 1 point
    **6 months later** Life & work took over but now back on track. The stand is now finished, painted Grey/Granite with a Satin Clear & Gloss white interior. Currently tossing up if I use that wood, or go with some stone; hardest decision ever! - But I'm thinking this wood will be better suited in a 2' tank :P
  40. 1 point
    I'm starting a brand new #neomix tank. I won't be adding or taking out any shrimp, just documenting developments along the way. I'm interested to see if any new variants develop, and what the tendency towards brown is. I'll be sharing updates on my channel if you are interested in following along. Enjoy! #shrimptv
  41. 1 point
    It is important that we as a community are responsible as hobbyists. Recent threats include the white spot virus that has been found in prawns in Queensland and the possibility that the crayfish plague has been introduced to our country via exotic crays from North America that might host this fungus and that have immunity to it. For example entire crayfish populations in Europe have been decimated by this disease because only the North American crays have immunity. It is well known that many in Australia keep and breed exotic shrimps and other creatures and in most cases this is not problematic but there are exceptions and so it is necessary that we have a handy resource on the forum that discusses this topic and provides relevant links. Australia has very strict quarantine laws; although we are allowed to keep and breed a number of different shrimps in Australia the importation of shrimp species not in the "suitable specimens for import" is extremely illegal and if you are caught you will almost certainly be handed a jail sentence. Local fish shops will often freely take any unwanted animals (even sick ones) and there are always plenty of other hobbyists who will jump at the chance to take them as well. Below are some simple rules that are universally applicable - ๐Ÿ˜  Do not release any fish or invertebrate from your aquarium to nature regardless of whether it is native to the area or came from that exact place; this is because they may have acquired a disease or parasite in your aquarium/pond and you could do much more harm than good. ๐Ÿ˜  Do not allow any of your aquarium water or other contents to enter stormwater drains or go anywhere that might find its' way into a body of water e.g. creek or lake etc. The Australian government advice is to dispose of your water down the sink/toilet. ๐Ÿ˜  Do not bring exotic animals into the country unless they are on the approved specimens list (link is below). ๐Ÿ˜  Do not collect wild specimens unless you have checked first that you are allowed to do so. ๐Ÿ˜  Do humanely euthanise your animals if/when necessary. (link is at the end of the article). ๐Ÿ˜Š Do enjoy keeping aquariums and treat your animals and our natural environment with the respect they deserve. Below are links to lists of noxious species and guides at a state and national level as well as links to RSPCA instructions for humane euthanisation Instructions for safe disposal of aquarium contents and animals and general guide to aquatic diseases - http://www.agriculture.gov.au/pests-diseases-weeds/aquatic/disease_watch_aquatic_animal_health_awareness/other_aquatic_biosecurity_materials National Guidelines for management of exotic fish trade including list of specimens suitable for import - http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade/exotics/exotic-fish-trade A.C.T. ???????? NSW Guide / Intro: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/freshwater-pests/ornamental-fish Full list of noxious species: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/noxious-fish-and-marine-vegetation N.T. Guide / Intro: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/about-aquatic-pests-and-biosecurity List of aquatic pests: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/list-of-aquatic-pests SA Guide / Intro: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests Full list of noxious species: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests/noxious_fish_list TAS Tasmania has especially strict requirements regarding importation of live animals. The three links below contain lots of relevant information (Thanks to @jayc for finding these) http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/animals-that-can-be-imported-with-entry-requirements/freshwater-aquarium-fish http://soer.justice.tas.gov.au/2009/indicator/84/index.php https://www.ifs.tas.gov.au/about-us/fishery-management/environment-and-conservation/prohibited-activities VIC Guide and list of noxious aquatic species: http://delwp.vic.gov.au/fishing-and-hunting/fisheries/marine-pests-and-diseases/noxious-aquatic-species-in-victoria QLD Guide / Intro: https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/fisheries/pest-fish/noxious-fish Full list of aquatic pests(refer to schedule 1 part 4 through 6): https://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/B/BiosecurityA14.pdf WA Guide / Intro: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx Full list of noxious species and proposed additions list can be found here: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx News article reporting on an incident of illegal shrimp importation: http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/taiwanese-student-jailed-for-illegally-importing-crystal-red-shrimps/news-story/f735730cdafd30cfb23f319bbe29215d?sv=d06fddccb50ab7281cfc7e74da630b8f Euthanisation Key Points / Summary: Not everyone can bring themselves to end the lives of their own animals but regardless; if you deem it necessary to end the life of any tank inhabitants and they are not a highly illegal specimen then please dp ask your local retailer first if they might be willing to try to save them for you. If this is not an option then please see below links. Humane euthanisation of fish: http://kb.rspca.org.au/what-is-the-most-humane-way-to-euthanase-aquarium-fish_403.html Humane euthanisation of crustaceans: http://kb.rspca.org.au/What-is-the-most-humane-way-to-kill-crustaceans-for-human-consumption_625.html disease-watch-brochure.pdf View full article
  42. 1 point
    It is important that we as a community are responsible as hobbyists. Recent threats include the white spot virus that has been found in prawns in Queensland and the possibility that the crayfish plague has been introduced to our country via exotic crays from North America that might host this fungus and that have immunity to it. For example entire crayfish populations in Europe have been decimated by this disease because only the North American crays have immunity. It is well known that many in Australia keep and breed exotic shrimps and other creatures and in most cases this is not problematic but there are exceptions and so it is necessary that we have a handy resource on the forum that discusses this topic and provides relevant links. Australia has very strict quarantine laws; although we are allowed to keep and breed a number of different shrimps in Australia the importation of shrimp species not in the "suitable specimens for import" is extremely illegal and if you are caught you will almost certainly be handed a jail sentence. Local fish shops will often freely take any unwanted animals (even sick ones) and there are always plenty of other hobbyists who will jump at the chance to take them as well. Below are some simple rules that are universally applicable - ๐Ÿ˜  Do not release any fish or invertebrate from your aquarium to nature regardless of whether it is native to the area or came from that exact place; this is because they may have acquired a disease or parasite in your aquarium/pond and you could do much more harm than good. ๐Ÿ˜  Do not allow any of your aquarium water or other contents to enter stormwater drains or go anywhere that might find its' way into a body of water e.g. creek or lake etc. The Australian government advice is to dispose of your water down the sink/toilet. ๐Ÿ˜  Do not bring exotic animals into the country unless they are on the approved specimens list (link is below). ๐Ÿ˜  Do not collect wild specimens unless you have checked first that you are allowed to do so. ๐Ÿ˜  Do humanely euthanise your animals if/when necessary. (link is at the end of the article). ๐Ÿ˜Š Do enjoy keeping aquariums and treat your animals and our natural environment with the respect they deserve. Below are links to lists of noxious species and guides at a state and national level as well as links to RSPCA instructions for humane euthanisation Instructions for safe disposal of aquarium contents and animals and general guide to aquatic diseases - http://www.agriculture.gov.au/pests-diseases-weeds/aquatic/disease_watch_aquatic_animal_health_awareness/other_aquatic_biosecurity_materials National Guidelines for management of exotic fish trade including list of specimens suitable for import - http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade/exotics/exotic-fish-trade A.C.T. ???????? NSW Guide / Intro: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/freshwater-pests/ornamental-fish Full list of noxious species: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/noxious-fish-and-marine-vegetation N.T. Guide / Intro: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/about-aquatic-pests-and-biosecurity List of aquatic pests: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/list-of-aquatic-pests SA Guide / Intro: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests Full list of noxious species: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests/noxious_fish_list TAS Tasmania has especially strict requirements regarding importation of live animals. The three links below contain lots of relevant information (Thanks to @jayc for finding these) http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/animals-that-can-be-imported-with-entry-requirements/freshwater-aquarium-fish http://soer.justice.tas.gov.au/2009/indicator/84/index.php https://www.ifs.tas.gov.au/about-us/fishery-management/environment-and-conservation/prohibited-activities VIC Guide and list of noxious aquatic species: http://delwp.vic.gov.au/fishing-and-hunting/fisheries/marine-pests-and-diseases/noxious-aquatic-species-in-victoria QLD Guide / Intro: https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/fisheries/pest-fish/noxious-fish Full list of aquatic pests(refer to schedule 1 part 4 through 6): https://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/B/BiosecurityA14.pdf WA Guide / Intro: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx Full list of noxious species and proposed additions list can be found here: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx News article reporting on an incident of illegal shrimp importation: http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/taiwanese-student-jailed-for-illegally-importing-crystal-red-shrimps/news-story/f735730cdafd30cfb23f319bbe29215d?sv=d06fddccb50ab7281cfc7e74da630b8f Euthanisation Key Points / Summary: Not everyone can bring themselves to end the lives of their own animals but regardless; if you deem it necessary to end the life of any tank inhabitants and they are not a highly illegal specimen then please dp ask your local retailer first if they might be willing to try to save them for you. If this is not an option then please see below links. Humane euthanisation of fish: http://kb.rspca.org.au/what-is-the-most-humane-way-to-euthanase-aquarium-fish_403.html Humane euthanisation of crustaceans: http://kb.rspca.org.au/What-is-the-most-humane-way-to-kill-crustaceans-for-human-consumption_625.html disease-watch-brochure.pdf
  43. 1 point
    Had these guys a bit over 2 weeks now and the growth has been amazing they have gone from under 2cm to over 5 which seems amazing until you think about their adult size of 45cm which they can reach in 6 months I'm getting a little worried how do you house 7 of these little monsters lol.
  44. 1 point
    So bunnings has a special on their DETA led downlights. 5x 12w for $69 so have gone with that option. They are daylight spectrum and rated to 900 lumens - I could only find independently tested specs on them for an earlier model on ledbenchmark.com but those came up pretty decent and I've already been using this brand for close to a year and I'm quite happy with how they perform. My buddy has rigged and tested the deta brand universal dimmer that bunnings also sells - we will put each of the four benches on a separate channel so I can easily turn a single bench on or off manually if/when I need. They will all run on a timer and fade on from 20% - 100% power over a few minutes period. The lights come with clips and we will suspend them inside of pvc tube a little above the tanks to keep them enough out of the way to give good spread over the tank and also avoid wasting too much light. When the LED system is setup I'll ask my mate about the technical side of it and include those details here for those interested. [emoji173][emoji111][emoji445] will
  45. 1 point
    From supplier: View full article
  46. 1 point
    If you are setting up a new aquarium, here is a short primer on how to set up your aquarium properly and efficiently. It may seem daunting at first, but assembling your new aquarium is easier than you think. Get all the aquarium materials ready First get all the aquarium materials ready by washing them thoroughly with warm water. Donโ€™t use commercial soaps and detergents as they are toxic to fish. Stick to the most common and the simplest aquarium ornaments. Sift the gravel over a bucket and drain, repeating the process until you are sure that the gravel is debris-free. Fill your tank with water and set up equipment The next step in the process is to fill your tank with water. Initially fill around 30% of the tank using room temperature water. You can add the rest of the water right after the internals such as airline tubing, live or plastic plants and other ornaments are added. The air tube is an essential part of the aquarium as it helps with the oxygenation of the water. Plants are generally added to hide equipment, help with the aqua scape or simply aid in the tanks biological ecosystem. The air pump, power filter, and heater are other types of equipment that should be added. De-chlorinate You need to treat the water in the aquarium to remove chlorine, which is harmful to your biological filter and could be lethal to your fish. It is important not to overdose on de-chlorinators, as they can have an impact on water chemistry. Cycle your aquarium When an aquarium is cycled, it means that you cultivate or grow a bacteria bed in your tank, specifically in the biological filters. The filters will grow bacteria that digest ammonia which converts to nitrite, which is naturally produced and lethal to fish, shrimp, and coral. Controlling these lethal elements is done by introducing healthy nitrifying bacteria into the aquarium. Before you add fish or shrimp, an aquarium must be cycled properly. This is called the fishless cycle. If you place all your fish or shrimp inside the aquarium without the cycling process, chances are they will probably die within a few days. Cycling your aquarium takes time and itโ€™s important not to rush it. In some cases, it has taken 6 โ€“ 8 weeks to properly cycle a tank. Adding the inhabitants Before adding your livestock, it is imperative to test the water. Specifically, the levels of ammonia and nitrite. You need to make sure that these two toxic nitrogen compounds are non-existent in the tank. Wait for two months before cleaning your new filter to allow significant growth of good nitrifying bacteria to populate. Acclimatise the livestock Acclimatising your livestock is a very important procedure because it helps your newly-acquired fish or shrimp adjust to their new habitat. Even a minor relocation can affect them because of changes in water parameters. Setting up a new aquarium takes a lot of planning and patience. Just follow the basic guidelines and the recommendations in this primer, and you will find that owning an aquarium is fulfilling and enjoyable.
  47. 1 point
    Non-aquatic plants to avoid! When you purchase aquarium plants, it's important that you understand that not all plants available for sale are truly aquatic. Vendors have no qualms offering this plants for sale, because they are very easy to obtain, and it is rare that you will see the designation "non-aquatic." While these plants can often survive as long as a year submerged, more often than not, they begin to decompose in as little as a couple of weeks or months, causing an ammonia spike, which can lead to algae, or worse, prove toxic to fish. These plants are not meant to be grown in an aquarium long-term and it is best that you avoid purchasing them for your benefit and the benefit of the non-aquatic plant. They are terrestrial plants and are meant for either indoor or outdoor gardening. They are at their best when they planted and cared for the right way. Japanese Rush (Acorus gramineus) Often sold in pots with rockwool, this plant will survive in the aquarium upto a year, but prefer cooler temperatures. In warm tropical tanks, this plant will turn to mush very quick. Aquatic alternatives such as Lilaeopsis species, Echinodorus tenellus, Sagittaria subulata, Vallisneria species can be used. Caladium (Caladium bicolor) This plant will only survive in the aquarium for upto 6 weeks (best kept with its leaves out of the water). These are usually sold in pots with rock wool. Aquatic alternatives such as Tiger lotuses and Barclaya longifolia can be used. English Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans) This plant can survive long periods in the aquarium, these are usually sold as seedlings about 20cm tall either in pots or in bunches. In terrestrial environments, these can grow upto 2m tall. Aquatic alternative such as Hygrophilia difformis can be used. Aluminum Plant (Pilea cadierei) This plant may last in the aquarium for a few weeks, but will eventually melt away. Aquatic alternatives is the Blue Stricta. Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum) Another plant found in the trade as a potted plant. While it may grow very well in terrestrial form, once submerged it will root very quickly. Alternatively you can use larger Sagittaria species. Lucky Bamboo (Dracaena sanderiana) The lucky bamboo is very common these days among aquarists. If the leaves are kept out of the water, it can survive for a very long time. Once completely submerged, the lifespan is roughly 8 weeks. It is usually sold as rooted stalkes. Fittonia verschaffeltii This compact little plant is usually sold in pots, but unfortunately it will only last a couple of weeks in the aquarium before it begins to decay. Alternatively you can used Staurogyne sp. Purple Waffle Plant (Hemigraphis colorata) One of the most commonly seen non-aquatic plant in the trade. It is often sold in cuttings secured with rubberbands or lead weights. It may survive upto a year in the aquarium but would require high lighting and high iron levels. This plant will slowly deteriorate. Alternatively you can use Lobelia cardinalis. Iresine lindenii A beautiful plant, but completely unsuitable for the aquarium. It is often sold as a potted plant in the aquarium trade. Alternatively you can use Alternantera reineckii. Selaginella moss (Selaginella martensii) Unfortunately, this plant only has a 2-week lifespan in the aquarium and is often sold in pots. However, it makes an excellent paludarium plant. Very similar to Selaginella martensii is Selaginella willdenowii (umbrella fern, peacock fern). Aquatic Alternatives - Aquatic mosses, including Frontinalis antipyretica, Taxiphyllum barbieri and other Taxiphyllum species, and Vesicularia dubyana and it's related species. Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii) There is a lot of debate regarding the Peace Lily, and it is often seen in the trade as a potted aquarium plant. In Peter Hiscock's book, it is listed as a suitable plant for the aquarium, since it is extremely hardy and can remain healthy in the home aquarium for many months or even years. It is slow growing and can grow with minimal effort and in lower light levels. It is not, however, a true aquatic plant. Arrowhead Plant (Syngonium podophyllum) Though suitable for paludariums, the "arrowhead plant" quickly dies if left submerged. It can, however, be kept in situations where its roots are submerged. It is often sold as a potted aquarium plant. Aquatic alternatives - Hygrophila corymbosa, Echinodorus "Ozelot green", Anubia species Mondo grass (Ophiopogon japonica) Mondo Grass is not a true aquatic plant. It will survive for awhile underwater but will not prosper. Best if taken out after a couple of months. Alternatively you can use Hairgrass or Blyxa japonica If you know any other plants I have missed, please post them below :)
  48. 1 point
    Better colored shrimp will have better coloration than lower grades, regardless of color of the substrate. Generally speaking, females will have 12-30 eggs. It takes approximately 3-4 weeks for the eggs to hatch. You might be able to encourage breeding by feeding a high protein diet (too much protein isn't good!), such as frozen blood worms or brine shrimp, or having a sudden temperature drop in the tank (but not too drastic!) via a partial water change. Care needs to be taken though, as it is possible to cause a berried female to molt, which means she'll shed her eggs with the molt. Females mate shortly after molting. Males will mate with any available female that's willing.
  49. 1 point
    Been a long time since I've made any posts. I had forgotten that I had a feed setup here. Gotta thank NoGi for that one! I bought some new camera equipment that allowed me to mount flashes on this weirdly positioned tank. Before this, I had no means to capture good photos of these shrimps. Glad you like them. The Bloodied Red Wines are my favorite. There's a few babies swimming around that looks to be of this type. Super excited to see them grow.
  50. 1 point
    A Generally accepted method of spot dosing with H2O2 (Hydrogen Peroxide) We will work with a 30cm cube to make all calculations easier (30L of water) and be using 3% solution of H2O2 Remember you are playing with a chemical that oxidizes when it comes in contact with organic matter, so always use as little as possible as overdoses can damage your invertebrates (shrimp) or nitrifying bacteria causing your tank to cycle again. MAXIMUM dosage in a 30L body of water is 15ml in a 48 hour period, this will increase total peroxide levels by 15 mg/l, generally this is deemed safe, but always best to work well and truly under this level. Things you will need: Half hour of time Hydrogen Peroxide (3% solution) - easily purchased from your local super market or pharmacy 1x 10ml syringe, these are available relatively cheaply from your pharmacy Prepare your tools: Draw up 5ml of your H2O2 If this is the first time you're doing this, before you start the actual dosing process add 2.5ml of tank water as this will give you slightly more ammo to play with without increasing your overall dose. Prepare your tank: Turn off all filters and pumps. This is so you don't have a current in the body of water (should only take 30seconds to settle). also if your dosing near your intake best to avoid getting H2O2 in the filters as it will go bananas on all the good bacteria you have in there. Plan your attack: Take a step back look at what your treating and figure out if you have more than one place to dose or if its just localized less time your filters are off the better. Not an Ideal situation to be fiddling around for an hour with your filtration off Attack: Dose sparingly directly above the site you wish to treat, within a second or two you will see it bubbling away. try to avoid sensitive mosses and such if in doubt patch test first. An example of what the effect is: Finish up: Wait a couple of minutes and turn everything back on. It is generally suggested to do a water change (one third) if you wish to re-dose within 48hrs, but as we are only playing with a third of the maximum dosage you can repeat this the next day if you feel it necessary, or if you have more algae than this dosage allows you to treat..... Good Luck and if in doubt ask questions on the forum, there is plenty of experienced shrimp keepers that are willing to help out!!!!