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    • Subtlefly
      By Subtlefly
      Hi Team,
      So here is the list of what has been purchased
      900x400x200 PPG starphire glass rimless tank (custom build) 10mm glass
      Flat one ONF+ warm white 60 cm pendant light (rated for 17 to 20 gallons - so hopefully can put it high and it will be bright enough! - the 90cm is rated for 40 to 48 gallons)
      Eheim ecco 130 filter
      Seachem Matrix (for the filter)
      DOOA Stream Pipe ARC P-2 (13mm) 
      DOOA Stream Pipe V-1 (13, H15mm) 
      ADA power sand advance 2 kg
      ADA amazonia fine granules  9L
      ADA amazonia II (with extras) 9L
      ADA cube garden mat 8mm   900x450 ( will have to trim it)
      Seachem flourishm liquid fertiliser
      I think other than some tweezers and curved scissors that is it so far..  I will start to post pics when the tank arrives!  
      Thanks and have a great day
      sub
       
       
       
    • Mossvetica
      By Mossvetica
      first of all I'm sorry for my bad english. I use translation.
      Soon I will build 40-liter Taiwan bee aquariums.
      I think to use 4 liters of akadama under gravel filter and 1 liter benibachi on the floor.
      Do you think using two different active soils is dangerous or harmful?
      Some people have said that the life of active soils will be shortened.
      Thanks.
       

    • Seattleshrimp
      By Seattleshrimp
      Hi ! 
      I have a ton of extra Java moss that I got from a lfs near me. I covered all of my driftwood already and made some stainless steal mesh carpets with them. 
      What else should I do with them ? Can I just leave them free floating in my tank ? 
       
      Thanks for any suggestions ! 
    • Seattleshrimp
      By Seattleshrimp
      Hi ! 
      I live in Seattle where the water is incredibly soft and I have a tap water pH of 6.7, GH of 0-1 and KH 2. My existing tank with plants already has buffered substrate. Would I have better chance of keeping CRS than RCS with my current water parameters ? Or would RCS do okay?    I do have an RO system already, and I could  remineralize my water with salty shrimp KH/GH+. Which would allow my GH and KH parameter to be okay for neocaridinas, but I already have a tank with active substrate. I’m 100% I don’t have space to set up another tank with inert substrate.    Would do you recommend ? What are pH you have successfully kept neocaridinas and have them thriving ?    Thanks ! I appreciate all the help as I am new to the hobby. 
    • ohaple
      By ohaple
      Hello,
      I have recently started working towards keeping shrimp. We keep other terrestrial invertebrates (isopods, mantises, and cockroaches) and thought that shrimp would pose an interesting new challenge.
      With our mantises, we have focused on bioactive vivariums that include a cleanup crew, microfauna, and plants. That isn't the norm for mantises, but it is almost a necessity in the shrimp-keeping hobby from what I have seen. We intend to take the same approach, including heavily planted tanks, shrimp, snails, and possibly some mosquito rasboras if we are able to establish our shrimp well.
      I have some experience with aquariums through helping my dad, who has had several freshwater and saltwater aquariums. That said, shrimp are completely new to us.
      My goal is to establish two shrimp tanks, a 7 gallon and a 1 gallon. I understand that smaller is harder.
      7-Gallon Tank
      Started with the Imagitarium 6.8g rimless tank from Petco. Modified the filter system to include more biomedia and a more powerful water pump. Using Eco-Complete for substrate since it is widely recommended for planted tanks and shrimp look better on dark substrate from what I read. Using Mopani wood as our primary hardscape. We soaked it for several days prior to adding to the tank, but it continues to leech some tannins. We are trying to stay fairly focused on plants, especially in the beginning. No CO2, but we are dosing ferts and Excel. Our plants include: Bacopa as a background plant. S. repens as a mid-ground sort of plant. I plan on letting it create bushes more than creating a carpet. Micro-sword for a foreground carpeting plant. Anubias nana for mid-ground/background. I would like to add a little dwarf water lettuce but haven't yet found a source. Our plants are notably lacking moss, which I read is preferred for shrimp. We may end up adding a little java moss but I am hoping the micro-sword will give them enough surface area to be happy. Once cycled, we will be adding shrimp. We are likely going to get blue velvets, starting with 10-15. Once the shrimp are added, the fish will be moving out. To start out, we are working on cycling the tank. We used some stuff from an established aquarium and added Safestart+ to kickstart the bacteria. Keeping the tank at about 78F with a few Zebra Danios and two mystery snails to keep ammonia going while the bacteria gets established. We are dosing Prime and doing daily water changes to keep the temporary inhabitants happy. It was started about a week and a half ago, and while we aren't seeing ammonia dissipate like we want, it is steadily working. We don't plan to add shrimp until we have 0 Ammonia and 0 Nitrite.
      Here are some photos of the process and where we are now:
      First setup, keeping plants in as we get the hardscape ready

      After setting up wood and the rest of the plants

      1-Gallon Tank
      Started with a one gallon vivarium style container from Michael's Originally planned on it being a no-tech tank, but decided I would be happier with some water movement and filtration. I designed a custom water pump sponge filter. Used Eco-Complete for Substrate Using Malasian driftwood for hardscape. Sticking to fewer plants for this build to stay more organized. Monte carlo planted in substrate for carpet, and a monte carlo mat to cover up the filter. A little bush of s. repens. A small bit of anubias nana. Would like to add a floating plant, but havent been able to source any. Once cycled, I will be adding shrimp. Planning on 5 RCS or orange rili to start. Cycling this tank has been much harder so far. We added some Safestart+, but have not seen any real progress yet. I am keeping two small nerite snails in here to create the ammonia, feeding them since algae hasn't established. This tank will be much more of a custom project for us. I designed and built a 1"x2"x3" large water pump sponge filter to help the water stay a little more clear and give the bacteria some flow to process the ammonia. For the lid, we are also going completely custom, designing an acrylic and wood lid with built in lighting and containment for floating plants. We have a laser cutter and CNC so it is fun to have the lid be a separate design project. My goal with the lights is to have too much light available, and the ability to dim. That way we can grow the plants but turn down to reduce algae problems as needed. This tank will eventually go on my desk at work. Since it is a pretty professional environment, it is important that this tank isn't noisy or technical looking, and is attractive for client meetings in my office. There is a rather small available footprint which is why we went with the 1-gallon, even though it will be more challenging. So far, it looks like we are getting a little nitrite, but its slow going. Doing daily water changes and dosing Prime so we don't kill off the snails.
      Here is the custom filter. The sponge media goes in the acrylic cage, and water is pushed out the grated hole. It fits neatly behind the driftwood and is not visible except from directly in the back. The top is covered in a monte carlo mat to hide it better.


      Here it is set-up and slowly cycling. We are temporarily using a CFL hood for the light to keep the plants going well. It also raises the water temperature to about 75F, not very high for establishing bacteria.


       
      I already received some good advice from @jayc regarding how the temperature needed for Zebra Danios is lower than the recommended temperature to get bacteria growing quickly. I am hopeful that with some patience and careful monitoring, the danios will stay healthy and the bacteria will get going. I have read many articles about fish/fishless cycling and do not plan to change to fishless for this build.
      Any comments or advice appreciated. We are taking it slow, but are getting excited for cycling to complete so we can start adding shrimp.
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    • beanbag
      yes, it's the shed shells. now that I think about it, I also remember in the video the bugs were clear, and I have seen clear ones before too, a long time ago.  But these recent ones were dark colored. So I have two tanks.  In one of them, where I normally have this problem, I have been dosing antibiotics.  The short version is that most of the shadow panda and RWP shrimp have got this disease, but they haven't died either.  But they don't recover either.  They just simply stop growing and stay at a small size with stumpy short antenna.  The first shadow panda that got this problem is still alive maybe 2-3 months later. In my other tank which often doesn't have this problem also got it, but it seems to have hit harder, where both "almost adult" shadow panda suddenly got it and died within a few days.  Antibiotics didn't save them.  It's too weird - it seems like this problem comes on suddenly, with no trigger that I can think of.  (besides "the weather was warm and I ran the air conditioned".  This doesn't actually affect the water temperatures since I have a chiller, but maybe something blew into the tank?)
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry for the delay, I have been searching on here and the wider web but cannot find what you are referring too! I do know which video you are talking about and remember seeing it. The video was of a shed shell rather than a live shrimp! Are you seeing them on live shrimp? From memory I don't think it was anything to worry about and I very much doubt it would discriminate between different colours of shrimp, but was probably nothing to worry about and just part of the life in aquariums, like detritus worms and other life forms. I think they were colourless in the video, if my memory is any good? Are you still getting shadow panda deaths?
    • beanbag
      Hello folks, I remember reading about this a few years ago but for the life of me cannot find this info / thread again. Can somebody point me to a link for this info? I forgot the forum I saw it on. There was a discussion about how if you look at a shrimp molt shell under a microscope or loupe, sometimes you can see tiny "bugs" or whatever moving around inside. At that time, I think the conclusion was that maybe it was a symbiotic relationship because it even happened with healthy shrimp. But I can't remember if this occurred only in neocaridina or caridina also? I just happened to look at a shadow panda's (caridina) shell who is sick with the "shortened antenna disease" that I always complained about. There were tiny blue/black spots moving around inside.  I also looked at the molt shells of some blue bolts that don't have this problem, and there were very few, or none, spots moving around inside the molt shell. I wonder if this could be some symbiotic relationship gone wrong and is the actual (proximate) cause of the problem.  (Since antibiotics didn't really seem to work) In that case, I would need some kind of anti-parasite medication to cure the shrimps.  What are the typical internal anti-parasite medications for shrimps?
    • sdlTBfanUK
      You may end up losing this batch entirely but then you can start completely fresh and get the aquarium set up right for the next batch of shrimp! If you do any large water changes then try and add the new water slowly, either dripper or some other way. You should get yourself a TDS meter (as JayC above), they are cheap and readily available. You should always use a GH tester kit as well with shrimps, if you do the 50% water change that should halve the GH so you should get a reading after that, or if you can get a local fish store to test it for you that will give you an idea of the GH. If your water supply is as hard as it appears it may be you will need to mull over how (or even IF) you want to keep shrimps as that may mean using RO or distilled/bottled water and buying a proper shrimp specific remineraliser? That will be quite expensive but you won't then have to mess about adding crushed coral/eggshells etc, but only you can decide whether you want to do/spend that much etc? If you live somewhere that gets a lot of rain, then you can use rain water? Also, as JayC states, you need to know what you are using/adding to the water and aquarium, ie fertilizers, rocks. Unless you have very exotic plants you shouldn't need any fertilizers. Just as a note, we have come across quite a few experienced fish keeprs that have this sort of start off issues with shrimp. Shrimp are more difficult than fish, and the aquarium and water etc need to be ready and within the required parameters before getting the shrimps. Usually people jump in, get the shrimps before everything is ready/sorted. Hopefully though you will keep at it, or if this lot die you will have another go and we can help you get it sorted?
    • jayc
      These are all classic symptoms of shrimp moulting problems.   Again, another high GH symptom. High GH not only causes harder carapace (shell), but it also makes eggs harder. When the egg is harder the male finds it more difficult to fertilise the eggs.   That's a worry if you can't get a good GH reading because that is going to be most likely issue right now for you.   Because snails don't moult.    If you dont already have a TDS meter, I suggest getting one asap. It's another test to narrow down your water parameters, and not have to trust one test by it's own - in this case the GH test kit. I would wager your water parameter is too high in dissolved minerals - likely from the tap water source, fertiliser dosing and/or any rocks/crushed corals you might have in the tank. To remedy this, you need to start doing water changes with RO, distilled or rain water immediately. I would do a 50% water change with RO water asap. Then look for sources that increase GH in the tank and eliminate it - fertilisers, rocks, crush corals, shells.    It's difficult to save a shrimp who's carapace is already too hard, but hopefully any younger shrimps will benefit from the water change and the reduced GH.   Good luck and keep us updated.
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