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Found 8 results

  1. Hi ! I have a ton of extra Java moss that I got from a lfs near me. I covered all of my driftwood already and made some stainless steal mesh carpets with them. What else should I do with them ? Can I just leave them free floating in my tank ? Thanks for any suggestions !
  2. Cryptocorynus

    Easily Grow Moss Emersed

    I've recently got into mosses after receiving small portions of about 14 varieties from a friend as a bonus from a purchase. When they arrived I wasn't exactly sure what to do with them as before this I had only ever grown the basics (eg. Java Moss, Peacock Moss, Flame Moss, etc.) and all of a sudden I have rare mosses like F. splachnobryoides and F. zippelianus just sitting in clip-seal bags on my dining room table. Suffice to say I had a little problem as my tanks were full to the brim with other stuff, and as a stickler for quarantine I wasn't going to have them sharing the same tank. A lot of the mosses also needed high light, low temperatures and CO2. So I began thinking... and thinking... and thinking. And eventually I came up with an ingenious idea to give them high light, easy access to CO2, low temperatures and all the other things they needed, all while keeping them separate from one-another. I decided on growing them emerse (as I have had luck with Echinodorus and Cryptocorynes that way in the past). However, I wasn't too keen on using the soil mixes I had used before as they always absorbed too much water and ended up covering the medium in algae, so knowing this I decided on perlite instead and I would be mindful to keep the liquid level a lot lower than the top of the perlite to avoid algae potentially covering the mosses. Be mindful your perlite cannot fall out of the pot, however, as the pot I used had large holes on the bottom of it (I used filter wool to plug them). For extra growing help I decided to switch out water (which I had used when growing plants emerse in the past) for BioJuice (a seaweed mix for hydroponic use which promotes vegetative growth, not flowering or root growth like most) to use as the liquid, and for each pot which a moss to be contained inside a bag for humidity which I then put onto my verandah in a place where it would not be too hot, but would also get a decent amount of sunlight with the moss laid out on top of the perlite. This'll be a work in progress. It's not too clear now but I'll work on that later today and into the future. Better photos will come, don't worry! The location of the bags on my verandah. A close view of the set-up (excuse the fog). This one is already growing after about a week.
  3. Cryptocorynus

    Easily Grow Moss Emersed

    I've recently got into mosses after receiving small portions of about 14 varieties from a friend as a bonus from a purchase. When they arrived I wasn't exactly sure what to do with them as before this I had only ever grown the basics (eg. Java Moss, Peacock Moss, Flame Moss, etc.) and all of a sudden I have rare mosses like F. splachnobryoides and F. zippelianus just sitting in clip-seal bags on my dining room table. Suffice to say I had a little problem as my tanks were full to the brim with other stuff, and as a stickler for quarantine I wasn't going to have them sharing the same tank. A lot of the mosses also needed high light, low temperatures and CO2. So I began thinking... and thinking... and thinking. And eventually I came up with an ingenious idea to give them high light, easy access to CO2, low temperatures and all the other things they needed, all while keeping them separate from one-another. I decided on growing them emerse (as I have had luck with Echinodorus and Cryptocorynes that way in the past). However, I wasn't too keen on using the soil mixes I had used before as they always absorbed too much water and ended up covering the medium in algae, so knowing this I decided on perlite instead and I would be mindful to keep the liquid level a lot lower than the top of the perlite to avoid algae potentially covering the mosses. Be mindful your perlite cannot fall out of the pot, however, as the pot I used had large holes on the bottom of it (I used filter wool to plug them). For extra growing help I decided to switch out water (which I had used when growing plants emerse in the past) for BioJuice (a seaweed mix for hydroponic use which promotes vegetative growth, not flowering or root growth like most) to use as the liquid, and for each pot which a moss to be contained inside a bag for humidity which I then put onto my verandah in a place where it would not be too hot, but would also get a decent amount of sunlight with the moss laid out on top of the perlite. This'll be a work in progress. It's not too clear now but I'll work on that later today and into the future. Better photos will come, don't worry! The location of the bags on my verandah. A close view of the set-up (excuse the fog). This one is already growing after about a week. View full article
  4. Kaylenna

    ID on red spiky stuff

    I noticed recently that some of my java moss seems to have very bright red spiky things growing from some main stems. Most of it is near the top of the tank (and therefore, the light). Is it an algae of some sort? Should I leave it be or pluck it all out?
  5. jc12

    3D Moss Ledge

    I recently acquired a couple of 3D moss ledges from @newbreed Aquatics (https://newbreedaquatics.com.au/planted-tanks/aquascaping-tools) with the thought of trialing them and organising my moss collection neatly. When I received them, I was impressed with the quality of the mesh and didn't want to use them for the 'common' moss like java, peacock, flame, etc. so I kept them aside and told myself to look for a 'worthy' moss for it when I get a chance. Fast forward to this week, I was fortunate enough to be offered some rare cameroon moss from a generous SKF member. That's right... you can see where this is leading to. The mesh is made of a thick plastic material and feels really sturdy, unlike typical stainless steel mesh which is flimsy and bends easily. This makes holding and working with it easy and comfortable, especially with my big clumsy fingers. The mesh can be detached from the suction cup by twisting it 90 degrees and pulling it out. This means the suction cup could be left on the glass if you want to only remove the mesh for trimming/propagating the moss. Perhaps this would prolong the lifespan of the suction cup. Only time will tell. The edge of the mesh has notches which makes tying the mesh extremely easy and neat. I really like it. I generally do not trust suction cups... e.g. heater suction cups, metacube suction cups, etc. and this is no exception. While the suction cup is of a typical size (wish it is larger), it is soft, supple and feels quality, unlike some hard rubbery suction cups that come with cheap heaters. The suction cup stuck on to the glass without any issue, and time will tell if it will hold up well. I am reserving my verdict for the suction cup at this stage. Overall, I am quite pleased with this moss ledge, especially how easy it is to hold, work with it, and tie it guided by those notches. Aesthetically, I would have preferred a white or transparent suction cup.  A suggestion perhaps is to sell replacement suction cups separately should they are required to be replaced, especially since the suction cup is designed to fit the rectangular groove of the mesh. A well thought out product, quality made and well priced.
  6. I took some inspiration from @Disciple 's tank and bought some moss ledges. I do not put any stainless steel in my tanks at all as I am concerned about chromium, nickel and manganese ions seeping out of it in a vat of freefloating ions that we call tanks...I found metal-free 3D-printed plant ledges at www.aquakitz.com.au for $4 each ( Elevate Shrimp brand). They come in a printed resin that does not smell of plastic at all and is stable in water. I am extremely impressed with the large, robust, super-grippy suction cups- I do not think I have ever come across better ones. Will highly recommend to anyone looking for moss ledges.
  7. Hi all, just looking into to doing an all Chameleon Shrimp only tank set up, I have a 27l tank which I had planned to do but decided against it, so now looking to perhaps do the same tank but with no plant life, except mosses, driftwood, just after some information for a I guess you could call a Chameleon Biotope tank. Substrate? Flora? Water Parameters? The tank will be some time off from being started as I want to look into everything first. Mosses I have in mind are Native Weeping Moss, mini Pellia, any others I could perhaps consider? Driftwood will be a piece of Gold Vine. Thoughts?
  8. A mate and I just returned from East Gippsland after a couple of days running around hunting various things. As is normal for us we left Melbourne about 10pm thursday and drove until about 4am - that way we maximise our time out there and don't spend a potentially good day sitting in the car. We had a few objectives for the trip and as normal only fulfilled some of those. Our primary goal to check the last possible location in Victoria for a generally NSW Utricularia species (uniflora) had to be aborted for the second time, this time due to track closures and an approaching severe thunderstorm. The site is so remote it's no wonder that nobody gets out there. Next time we'll need a chainsaw in the car to get through. BTW I intend to bore you all with this non-aquarium stuff before moving on. Deal with it! A secondary goal was to photograph an orchid species in the same general area, which we did achieve: Dipodium variegatum, near Mallacoota Another secondary goal was to see a couple of tree frog species in the rainforest pockets out there. Litora citropa (Blue Mountains Tree Frog) is known from Victoria these days but we couldn't find any adult frogs, a shame as neither of us has seen this species in the wild. Litoria nudidigita was the other target and we found them in abundance. I have seen these before when they were still called L. phyllochroa but my mate had never seen them. Hunting frogs around rivers at night is not something I carry my camera for, so fortunately we also found one during the day: Litoria nudidigita, near Cann River We saw some interesting things walking around the rainforests. Unfortunately it was very dark and I discovered the tripod mount had fallen off my camera somewhere (doh), so the shots are all handheld and pretty average. For the flowers below (and frog above) I was standing on tip toes and just couldn't set the focal plane where I wanted. Asclepiad species (something like a Hoya) another nice tiny flower Thurra river tributary - typical sandy bottom and tannic water Forest floor We bumped into a young German bloke traveling alone and for his benefit I grabbed a nice male Water Dragon for him to photograph. That made his day, so a minute later my mate saw a White-lipped snake and I grabbed it too as it raced off the path. As I picked it up I saw the Tiger stripes on it and realised the mistake. We all got an uneasy laugh out of that but I think the young tourist will remember that walk for some time. Sorry but my hands were too full to get photos. Something I've only seen a couple of times before is the larvae of a butterfly - Jalmenus evagoras, the Imperial Blue Hairstreak, with its attendant ants. In the same way that terrestrial orchids fascinate me because of their reliance on a symbiotic relationship with mycorrhizal fungus, the butterfly family Lycaenidae (blues) fascinate me due to their symbiotic relationships with ants. The ants protect the caterpillars and pupae and are rewarded with a sugary secretion from the butterfly larvae. Nature is wonderful. At another site I was able to photograph a pretty amazing dragonfly, despite having the wrong lens on the camera. Eventually he allowed me to sneak close enough to get this heavily cropped pic: I'll wind up "part 1" here because of time constraints and prepare myself for part 2, which will mainly cover mosses, shrimp and their habitats.
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