Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TheKeeper

Co2 in a planted shrimp tank

Recommended Posts

TheKeeper

Ive done alot of research but let me explain my set up for you. I have a 6 gal tank that is approx 12 inch tall. It is a fertilized and currently has a DIY co2 on it, i did this by taking a 2 liter bottle and adding sugar and yeast, it is connected to a special co2 bubble (whatever they are called). The tank also has high lighting and is completely planted carpeted and bigger plants. Im about to be adding in my cherry shrimp and know that gassing them with co2 is possible at night. And im wanting to avoid this of course. Yet i dont want to spend alot of money upgrading my co2 system. The co2 bubblier is only 8-9 inchs from the water line. The majority of the bubbles reach the surface meaning not all the co2 is dissolving or there are other gasses present. Im wondering if I can get away with this co2 delivery system. Or what simple upgrades could be made so that it doesn't run at night? from what i understand it would be at night i would gas the shrimp? Also I do a 50% water change 1 if not 2 times a week. 

 

Options ive thought of-

1. Instead of a 2 liter bottle maybe like a 12 oz bottle, scale back the yeast and sugar so there is less co2 being produced

2. Releasing the pressure in the DIY bubblier before bed. so it would take maybe 4-6 hour for the pressure to build up again and start bubbling 

3. Upgrading system (Dont want to do this really, but i though of it)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WhySoCRS

You can turn the CO2 off at lights out mate, u don’t need it during the night when there is no lighting period.


Sent from my iPhone using Shrimp Keepers Forum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc

@TheKeeper, it is very difficult keeping plants and shrimp together in a high light/high fert tank. It's one or the other. A compromise is needed. 

Since you don't want to spend money to fix the overnight CO2 gassing, then then shrimp has to go.

Alternatively, I question how many plants you can have in a 6gal the needs co2.

What plants do you have?

Can you change them to low light mosses, ferns or subwassertang?

 

 

@WhySoCRS, you can't turn off DIY co2. It keeps producing co2 in the bottle until all the sugar is consumed. If it is blocked to stop the bubbles from coming out, the bottle explodes!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TheKeeper

I can stop it by releasing all the pressure in it before bed. meaning it actually wont bubble again for 4-8 hours till the pressure builds up again. Thus delaying the co2 build up. Any suggestions for a cheaper co2 delivery system? Cause im very interested in having the full carpet on the bottom and i love the stunning green co2 provides.

@jayc Also, its very do-able to have both shrimp and a planted tank, I see it done to often.

I currently have S-repens (carpeted), and ill be adding  Pogostemon helferi, mayaca fluviatilis

icon_difficulty_Medium.png
 
 
Edited by TheKeeper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc
32 minutes ago, TheKeeper said:

Pogostemon helferi

Love the Pogo. You will have to post some pics. Pleeaassseeeee.

I didn't say it was not doable. It's difficult and requires a lot of attention. As long as you can maintain a tight regime of monitoring water parameters for both shrimp and plants, then it's doable. But alas, I'm lazy and busy. 

 

36 minutes ago, TheKeeper said:

Any suggestions for a cheaper co2 delivery system?

Don't know of a cheap system. You'll need something with a electronic solenoid on a CO2 tank that will shut off at nights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TheKeeper

@jayc Thanks for the help and advice, here in a couple of weeks once I get the system up and going and deside on what to do I will definitely post pictures!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WhySoCRS

Yeah I misread this as DIY CO2.


Sent from my iPhone using Shrimp Keepers Forum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bristlenose

why don't you remove the co2 diffuser at night? and just put it back in the morning. Sure it'll be a slight hassle but its better than gassing your shrimp, there's no need to release all of the pressure from your diy co2 kit. Alternatively you can leave it in and just purchase an air pump($10-$15 for the cheapest ones) and turn it on at night, I believe it'll be very difficult to produce enough co2 from a diy kit to gas your tank as long as their is an air pump running aswell. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • Patrick Gagnon
      By Patrick Gagnon
      I recently put in an order for 12 blue dream and 12 cherry shrimp. The shipping was delayed, Harrisburg PA distribution is terrible. Took over 9 days for them to arrive. 0 DOA. Nice! Anyway I've had them now for I'd say 2 weeks. One already is pregnant! And I recently found a guest staying. I have copepods all over, I heard they are fine. I'm not sure what this is. Looks to have antennas, like a snail or something.

    • Chels
      By Chels
      Update: I went with 4 chili rasboras, and could not be happier. They started eating the copepods literally seconds after I put them in the tank, and they even slurp up the detritus worms like spaghetti. They came from a tank with lots of juvenile shrimp, and haven't bothered my shrimp at all even when shoaling. If you want a shrimp-safe fish that will eat your copepods or detritus worms, get some chili rasboras!! 
      Original Post: Accidentally posted this in the new members forum like a true n00b, so im re-posting here where it belongs. 
      Hello all! I've only been keeping shrimp for a few weeks now, but I am already an overfeeding expert.
      Apparently in my zeal to give my shrimp the best life, I have grown a giant colony of copepods which I am worried may harm my first ever newborn shrimplets (which could hatch at any time). I've read that copepods are opportunists who will eat weaker shrimplets if given the chance. And with the amount I have in my tank rn, I foresee my first newborn babies hatching & being instantly swarmed. I also have 3 or so saddled females, soon to be berried females so I want to protect their future babies also. 
      I cannot for the life of me find any recommendations on freshwater fish who won't eat shrimplets. The recommendations are always with the caveat of "but I have total ground cover/top cover so most of my shrimplets survive." I have a ton of plants & hidey holes, but I also have some grazing areas where it's just a small patch of substrate since my shrimp love to be fed in those areas. I just started with 15 shrimp, so I don't have a huge colony and can't afford for any babies to be eaten rn. 
      I do have an albino bristlenose pleco who is very tiny, but she is a lazy betch and hasn't impacted the copepod population. I should also note I am using a 2g nanotank at the moment. It's a mixed tank with cherries, yellows & blue rilli so I can get a lot of different offspring to separate out and form colonies from in bigger 30g tanks. 
      Here are the fish I have heard work great, but may eat *some* shrimplets:
      Endlers (males or fry)
      Ruby tetras
      Rasboras
      Pygmy corys
      Rocket killifish (clownfish)
      Hatchetfish 
      Otocinclus
      Ember tetras
      Neon green tetras
      Gold ring danios
      Lowlight danios
    • Merlin
      By Merlin
      Hello - 

      I am firing up my planted aquarium and during the setup of my co2 regulator/solenoid I noticed a couple leaks that I am having troubles stopping.
      There was a very small leak at the connector from the needle valve to the solenoid.  I unthreaded and cleaned it up but upon reconnecting leak is still there (worse actually).

      My question is how do you seal these connection?  I hear teflon tape is not a good idea as it can cause some internal issues if small pieces break of.  Since this connection is past the regulator maybe less of an issue but still.
      Is this an ideal application for teflon tape?  or is there some other method?
      (edit, this is pic from the web.  My reg is a JBS but connections are the same)

      Thx,
      Merlin

    • Chels
      By Chels
      Hello all! I've only been keeping shrimp for a few weeks now, but I am already an overfeeding expert.
      Apparently in my zeal to give my shrimp the best life, I have grown a giant colony of copepods which I am worried may harm my first ever newborn shrimplets (which could hatch at any time). I've read that copepods are opportunists who will eat weaker shrimplets if given the chance. And with the amount I have in my tank rn, I foresee my first newborn babies hatching & being instantly swarmed. I also have 3 or so saddled females, soon to be berried females so I want to protect their future babies also. 
      I cannot for the life of me find any recommendations on freshwater fish who won't eat shrimplets. The recommendations are always with the caveat of "but I have total ground cover/top cover so most of my shrimplets survive." I have a ton of plants & hidey holes, but I also have some grazing areas where it's just a small patch of substrate since my shrimp love to be fed in those areas. I just started with 15 shrimp, so I don't have a huge colony and can't afford for any babies to be eaten rn. 
      I do have an albino bristlenose pleco who is very tiny, but she is a lazy betch and hasn't impacted the copepod population. I should also note I am using a 2g nanotank at the moment. It's a mixed tank with cherries, yellows & blue rilli so I can get a lot of different offspring to separate out and form colonies from in bigger 30g tanks. 
      Here are the fish I have heard work great, but may eat *some* shrimplets:
      Endlers (males or fry)
      Ruby tetras
      Rasboras
      Pygmy corys
      Rocket killifish (clownfish)
      Hatchetfish 
      Otocinclus
      Ember tetras
      Neon green tetras
      Gold ring danios
      Lowlight danios
    • Adam Bomb
      By Adam Bomb
      Hello everyone! 
      My area of Michigan (48065) seems to be a black hole for shrimp enthusiasts, and my hope was to uncover folks I can buy shrimp (and hopefully moss) from locally. Since the pandemic has paused all face-to-face meetings for local clubs until further notice, it's been rough (and I can't imagine paying online retail ridiculous prices for shipped shrimp)!
      Since we only have the "City" field (for location) on profiles, is there a better way to find local people? I'd love any help you can offer. 
  • Must Read SKF Articles

  • Join Our Community!

    Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

  • Posts

    • abepaniagua
      Also, I forgot to say and ask. Very few of my neos are 1 color. Most have a clear area where organs are, then circled by its color. Let me share a picture.  This shrimp seems like it's black but head area is clear. Most of my blue neos were like that.  Now this one is one of the few that grew up 1 colored, and I have no idea what freaking color it is. I didn't buy it, so I'm sure it's one of my first babies from last September/October. But parents were both blue neos, and it doesn't have a clear area where you can see organs. Is that normal?
    • abepaniagua
      Thank you for all the help. I believe the issue was a bacteria. Deaths have stopped so far. Shrimps are very active, they keep molting and there's still 1 berried female. I keep doing water changes until it cycles, and half the tank doesn't have the fuzzy white thing anymore. The other part does still.
    • Crystal Jade
      I haven't been able to find an ammonia test kit so maybe that was my problem but I woke up to no dead shrimp. Before I do a water change I want to make sure my water I have is correct with water parameters and GH and KH  especially. I did cycle my tank and it should be fully cycled by now.    Thank you all!
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry to hear you lost some shrimps! How big is your tank and how long has it been running? Did you do the 'cycle'? When doing a water change you should drip the new water into the tank. That will illiminate the temperature difference problem and any difference in parameters between the two waters. When acclimating new shrimps you should drip acclimate them as long as you can, the longer you do that the better chance they have of survival. You will need to match the water temperature to that of the tank by floating the container with the shrimp in the tank once you have stopped dripping, before adding the shrimp to the tank! The parameters you have I would think are acceptable so I would stick with tap water if that is what you are using, for now. RO water is ideal but you will then need to buy GH/KH+ to add the minerals. As I say, I would hold off using RO/distilled water for now until we can pin point the problem. If your water has a green tint to it that may be an algae bloom? A white tint is usually a bacteria bloom and I have only seen that whilst a tank is 'cycling'. I think an algae bloom will mean there is less oxygen in the water as the algae absorbs it?????? Overfeedinng is very common. It will depend upon the size of the tank and how long it has been running etc. With only a few shrimp there may actually be no need to feed additional to the natural biofilm of the tank. As shrimps are feeding all day on biofilm it is usually better to see additional food as just a treat and feed very sparingly. Overfeeding with shrimps doesn't usually mean that the shrimps over eat, it usually means  too much uneaten food polutes the water and if you have green tinted water, algae bloom, that may be why? There usually comes a time, if you are lucky, that there are too many shrimps in the tank for the biofilm to sustain on its own, so as the population grows feeding may become more necessary. Shrimp don't usually hide unless they are new to the tank or there are fish etc (even then they will usually adapt to them) or as JayC says, their is something wrong with the water quality?  Simon
    • Crabby
      Sorry... this was meant to be partially sarcastic. I mean it's a bit sad but I don't really mind all too much. Yeah they're like that, with those big mouths. 
×
×
  • Create New...