Welcome to SKF Aquatics (Shrimp Keepers Forum)

Welcome to SKF Aquatics (Shrimp Keepers Forum), like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of SKF Aquatics (Shrimp Keepers Forum) by signing in or creating an account.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.

Zebra

Good algae.

Recommended Posts

Zebra    137
Zebra

Hello, just wanted to show another food source I grow for my shrimp and snails. 

Algae.

Just how it looks, a plastic tub filled that gets lots of direct sun, I usually fill it with old water from my planted tanks to help the process.

Its a bit full ATM lol but there's a second tub underneath for extra strength.

IMG_3282.JPG

I just grab a small pinch and put it straight in my shrimp tanks, they all go nuts for it.

Alternatively you could remove excess water then dehydrate it on baking paper to make a dry feed.

IMG_3280.JPG

An hour or 2 later:

IMG_3300.JPG

Edited by Zebra
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
revolutionhope    424
revolutionhope

I'd like to add that if you use this method it's a good idea to ensure the container is sealed to prevent predators and parasites finding their way to your tanks..


will

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • travellife
      By travellife
      I picked up a packet of Hikari Crab Cuisine at the LFS and then noticed it contains copper sulfate.  I was thinking of feeding some to my neocaridina davidi var. orange until I noticed the copper sulfate in the ingredients.  Plus, I realize now Hikari also makes shrimp cuisine but I believe it also contains copper sulfate.  The only thing the shrimpettes have ever been fed is biofilm and Marineland Color Enhancing Flakes which supposedly does not contain copper according to the company.  Am I taking chances feeding the Hikari Crab Cuisine to them?  Or, is this the type of copper that is actually good for them in small amounts?
       
       
    • Zebra
      By Zebra
      Hello, so I was going to put this in diy but figured anyone can make food so its not really a diy, the more important aspect I guess I want to share or discuss is the nutrition side of things.
      Heres my diy shrimp/ fish food, 
      Especially great for getting meds into your beloved critters. 
      I in no way copied instructions on how to do this so I'm taking aaaaalll the creds lol. "Narcasist" 
      What you'll need: (buy organic where possible but doesn't really matter)
      A blender(or preferably stick blender)
      Baking paper
      An oven and fan(preferably a dehydrator if you or nana has one)
      Garlic (preferably fresh-not minced)
      Nori Seaweed sheets for sushi
      Spirulina powder
      dry yeast(preferably nutritional yeast) 
      Soybean husk(shrimp snow)
      Boiled sweet potatoe

      First blend up all your dry ingedients one by one into a course power.
      Then blend your garlic with a little bit of water, before adding it to your dry ingedients.
      Mix everything together well and add enough water to reach a "wet toothepaste" consistancy.
      Keep track of the quantities you've added and write them down for next time.
      Preheat your oven to about 160c and place a large room fan in front of you oven with the door open just slightly, your oven is now a ghetto dyhydrator lol
       

        Spread your mix out on a sheet of baking paper.  Place another sheet on top and use a rolling pin to flatten it right out.
      The thinner you make it the faster and better it dries- this needs to be fully 100 percent "cracker" dry as it is high in protein and will foul very fast if not dried properly- drying temps we use come close to pasteurisation temps so it is actually quite a sterile way to make clean food that won't go bad fast.

      Once it's dry enough- (You will be able to easily peel away the top sheet of baking paper without much sticking.)  Start breaking it up into smaller pieces so it dries more efficiently.

      When it's fully "cracker dry" and crumbles between your fingers it's done, this takes only 1-2 hours and can be done without having to check it if you use a proper dehydrator. (Great investment if you plant to do this often.)
      Store in air type bags to reduce moisture and oxygen exposure.

      First introduction to my RCS: (the tanks a mess right now "shame"

      10min later.... gone. Haha they showed massive interest so have all my Bettas. 

      Hope you guys like it.
    • s1l3nt
      By s1l3nt
      Ever wondered what that sweet bread dough smell is coming from your neighbours fish room? Read on to find out the secret to that beautiful (?) smell!
      Ever wondered what that sweet bread dough smell is coming from your neighbours fish room? Read on to find out the secret to that beautiful (to each their own right?) smell!
      Microworms are an easy to culture and maintain live food for your small/micro fish and especially for small fry. Size wise they fall somewhere between vinegar eels and baby brine shrimp (BBS) so is a good transition food prior to BBS. Nutrition wise they are a solid food source, but the fatty content may be a little on the higher side I believe so should not be a staple food permanently. Feeding a range of foods is best for the health of your fish and other aquatic friends.

      NOTE: Microworms sink fairly fast so be aware of this. They will also live a fairly long time in a fish tank, personally I have seen mine alive as long as 48 hours. But I would err on the side of caution and estimate a 24 hour “alive” time in a tank.
      Microworms can be cultured in a various mediums such as oats, bread, potato peelings, etc. Personally I use and prefer using white bread with the crusts cut off. The reason I prefer this method is because there is a much less foul smell as the culture matures, and even less of a foul smell when the culture crashes. It gives of a sour smell when it goes bad but otherwise smells yeasty similar to bread dough. Cultures can crash fairly easily in my experience and no one likes a horrible smell in their house/room/shed/etc…  I haven’t used bread crusts because they are usually coated in oil or similar to give the golden colour which causes a bit of a messy culture.
      Now onto the fun part, finding out how it is done!
      What you will need:
      - Some form of container. I use take away containers.
      - Bakers yeast. I use the Tandaco branded dry yeast which comes in small satchels will last quite a while… Real reason is that my wife uses it…. :)
      - Bread with crusts cut off. I use any brand that is on hand, doesn’t matter.
      - A starter culture of micro worms. I have these available for anyone interested :)
      - Water. Tap water is fine, and is what I use. Though it is possible to use tank water or milk (but milk smells worse in my experience).
      NOTE: You should always work with at least 2 cultures in the event one decides to crash that day when your fry are ready to feed!
      Steps to starting your culture:
      - Grab your bread with the crusts off and wet it with tap water. (You don’t want it soaking wet but rather similar to battering fish. Wet on both sides but not dripping or drenched throughout.)
      - Line your container with at least 1 layer of bread. (I find I have the most success with one layer personally but have used multiple in the past.)

      - Grab your starter culture and spread it over the bread.
      - Sprinkle some bakers yeast over the bread and the starter culture worms.

      - Put your lid on with some holes in it to allow oxygen exchange. (You can use filter wool loosely in the holes to prevent bugs/flies/etc from getting into your culture.
      - Wait a couple of days (if you have a good sized starter culture, they are ready within 24 hours) for the worms to do their magic.
      - Worms will climb the walls of the container, all you need to do then is use something like a pipette or your finger or similar to collect as many worms as needed. (I use the side of a pipette and put the worms into a small feeding container and then use the pipette to feed the fry/fish with a controlled amount of worms).

      - Reap rewards, benefits, remind everyone of this awesome information and spread those culture because you will lose them at some point! We all do… :) 
      Maintaining your culture:
      - You can prepare a slice of bread the same way as when you started a culture and drop this with a little bit of yeast ontop of your culture that is doing well. This will feed your worms further as they will eventually eat all the food you gave them in the beginning. (I find I can do this 1-2 times per culture before I have to start a fresh culture and use these worms as a large starter culture (don’t use the entire culture…)).
      NOTE: You can let your culture go dry and eventually wet it with tank water and drop some bread with yeast ontop and they will start a culture all over again. I believe this is because the worms lay eggs.
      Approximate Nutritional Values:
      Protein: 48%
      Fat: 21%
      Glycogen: 7%
      Orgainic Acids: 1%
      Nucleic Acids: 1%
      Please note - If you would like to share this article or use it outside of SKF please contact me for permission first. Thank you!

      NOTE: I am currently working on an aquatic hobby based website which will contain lots of information on things such as breeding fish, shrimp, live foods, nutritional values of foods, fish profiles, etc. Keep an eye out for this post but the website will be live as soon as I can possibly do so. The website is www.aquapixel.com.au

      View full article
    • s1l3nt
      By s1l3nt
      Ever wondered what that sweet bread dough smell is coming from your neighbours fish room? Read on to find out the secret to that beautiful (to each their own right?) smell!
      Microworms are an easy to culture and maintain live food for your small/micro fish and especially for small fry. Size wise they fall somewhere between vinegar eels and baby brine shrimp (BBS) so is a good transition food prior to BBS. Nutrition wise they are a solid food source, but the fatty content may be a little on the higher side I believe so should not be a staple food permanently. Feeding a range of foods is best for the health of your fish and other aquatic friends.

      NOTE: Microworms sink fairly fast so be aware of this. They will also live a fairly long time in a fish tank, personally I have seen mine alive as long as 48 hours. But I would err on the side of caution and estimate a 24 hour “alive” time in a tank.
      Microworms can be cultured in a various mediums such as oats, bread, potato peelings, etc. Personally I use and prefer using white bread with the crusts cut off. The reason I prefer this method is because there is a much less foul smell as the culture matures, and even less of a foul smell when the culture crashes. It gives of a sour smell when it goes bad but otherwise smells yeasty similar to bread dough. Cultures can crash fairly easily in my experience and no one likes a horrible smell in their house/room/shed/etc…  I haven’t used bread crusts because they are usually coated in oil or similar to give the golden colour which causes a bit of a messy culture.
      Now onto the fun part, finding out how it is done!
      What you will need:
      - Some form of container. I use take away containers.
      - Bakers yeast. I use the Tandaco branded dry yeast which comes in small satchels will last quite a while… Real reason is that my wife uses it…. :)
      - Bread with crusts cut off. I use any brand that is on hand, doesn’t matter.
      - A starter culture of micro worms. I have these available for anyone interested :)
      - Water. Tap water is fine, and is what I use. Though it is possible to use tank water or milk (but milk smells worse in my experience).
      NOTE: You should always work with at least 2 cultures in the event one decides to crash that day when your fry are ready to feed!
      Steps to starting your culture:
      - Grab your bread with the crusts off and wet it with tap water. (You don’t want it soaking wet but rather similar to battering fish. Wet on both sides but not dripping or drenched throughout.)
      - Line your container with at least 1 layer of bread. (I find I have the most success with one layer personally but have used multiple in the past.)

      - Grab your starter culture and spread it over the bread.
      - Sprinkle some bakers yeast over the bread and the starter culture worms.

      - Put your lid on with some holes in it to allow oxygen exchange. (You can use filter wool loosely in the holes to prevent bugs/flies/etc from getting into your culture.
      - Wait a couple of days (if you have a good sized starter culture, they are ready within 24 hours) for the worms to do their magic.
      - Worms will climb the walls of the container, all you need to do then is use something like a pipette or your finger or similar to collect as many worms as needed. (I use the side of a pipette and put the worms into a small feeding container and then use the pipette to feed the fry/fish with a controlled amount of worms).

      - Reap rewards, benefits, remind everyone of this awesome information and spread those culture because you will lose them at some point! We all do… :) 
      Maintaining your culture:
      - You can prepare a slice of bread the same way as when you started a culture and drop this with a little bit of yeast ontop of your culture that is doing well. This will feed your worms further as they will eventually eat all the food you gave them in the beginning. (I find I can do this 1-2 times per culture before I have to start a fresh culture and use these worms as a large starter culture (don’t use the entire culture…)).
      NOTE: You can let your culture go dry and eventually wet it with tank water and drop some bread with yeast ontop and they will start a culture all over again. I believe this is because the worms lay eggs.
      Approximate Nutritional Values:
      Protein: 48%
      Fat: 21%
      Glycogen: 7%
      Orgainic Acids: 1%
      Nucleic Acids: 1%
      Please note - If you would like to share this article or use it outside of SKF please contact me for permission first. Thank you!

      NOTE: I am currently working on an aquatic hobby based website which will contain lots of information on things such as breeding fish, shrimp, live foods, nutritional values of foods, fish profiles, etc. Keep an eye out for this post but the website will be live as soon as I can possibly do so. The website is www.aquapixel.com.au


  • Topics

  • Posts

    • pmasa
      Thanks for all the tips @Baccus, the route that i am currently taking is to get a at least on blue adult then separate it with a male/female and go from there. At this stage i am still waiting for them to grow to adult and to make sure that they hold their colour through to adulthood. @revolutionhope i have a feeling that black shrimp start as blue and the colour gets deeper as they get older until the point that it almost looks black. I found when i first opened the parcel with the shrimp that the stressed state caused more of the underlying blue to come out, before darkening again. I currently have 4 tanks at my disposal for shrimp, however i would like to get into the caridinas and devote a tank to them... As an aside i have found that the 3 females (+1 reddish male) in my 60L community tank are significantly larger than those in their own tanks, i am wondering if the slightly warmer temperature and significantly more abundant food is playing a role in the size.
    • EBC
      It was Fluval Shrimp Stratum which I have learned tends to have a relatively short life span compared to other soils. Will probably just replace it all in about 6 months when I move again. Any recommendations for one that will last the longest? And one that I can actually buy in Australia? But yes, I imagine that she was just weak from the pH swings from before. The three remaining males all seem perfectly healthy for now at least. I'll give it some time to make sure there are no more deaths and then maybe find a nice female to add. I have seen varying opinions on this, but how often would you suggest doing water changes (standard, not emergency) on a small tank like mine (28L)? I was doing them pretty infrequently before (~monthly; 20%) as I was using tap water so I wanted to avoid too many. Now that I will have an RO system would ~10% weekly be better? Or something else? Thanks again.
    • KillieOrCory
      Nice. Look forward to seeing the progress. I am too impatient to start from scratch but the challenge seems worthwhile to attempt.
    • revolutionhope
      When you added soil can I ask what soil it was ? Did you pre-cycle it? Also it's worth noting that if that shrimp had been through some stress while exposed to high pH they will have weakened immune systems and so other little issues can tip them over the edge.   More than once I've discovered problems and corrected them as carefully as I could only to still watch the occasional shrimp die over the following days and weeks still despite conditions being ideal I believe.   will     PS Just as an aside - ¥others will have different opinions and prefer to do multiple smaller waterchanges but my modus operandi when I feel that a tank is "stuffed" is to do one or two huuuuuuge waterchanges - carefully allowing the new water to drip in slowly over 24-48 hours and then leave it be. The three times now that I've done this to get myself out of a bad spot I have found that although some already weak shrimp may continue to pass away over the following days even up to 2 or 3 weeks later but the healthier ones bounce back quickly and are breeding already within a few weeks.
    • EBC
      No real updates unfortunately. All water parameters (ammonia, nitrites, nitrates, KH, GH, pH) were perfect on the day she died. All I can think is that the lack of buffering capacity left in the soil resulted in pH swings that killed her.  I added more soil and the water is back to being buffered at pH 6.4. I have switched to only using RO water now (bought 20L for now but have an RO unit on the way). Hopefully the substrate will buffer a bit longer now and this won't happen again. Just a shame as there are only 3 adult male CRS left in the tank plus the shrimplets from the female that just died. Could be a while before the numbers get back up on their own so I may need to replenish them (also a bit of genetic diversity would be good). How do people usually handle switching out substrate? Especially with baby shrimps around, that sounds like a real hassle and you are bound to lose some. Is there some special technique? Thanks!
  • Featured Products

  • Recent Articles