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Found 16 results

  1. It is important that we as a community are responsible as hobbyists. Recent threats include the white spot virus that has been found in prawns in Queensland and the possibility that the crayfish plague has been introduced to our country via exotic crays from North America that might host this fungus and that have immunity to it. For example entire crayfish populations in Europe have been decimated by this disease because only the North American crays have immunity. It is well known that many in Australia keep and breed exotic shrimps and other creatures and in most cases this is not problematic but there are exceptions and so it is necessary that we have a handy resource on the forum that discusses this topic and provides relevant links. Australia has very strict quarantine laws; although we are allowed to keep and breed a number of different shrimps in Australia the importation of shrimp species not in the "suitable specimens for import" is extremely illegal and if you are caught you will almost certainly be handed a jail sentence. Local fish shops will often freely take any unwanted animals (even sick ones) and there are always plenty of other hobbyists who will jump at the chance to take them as well. Below are some simple rules that are universally applicable - 😠 Do not release any fish or invertebrate from your aquarium to nature regardless of whether it is native to the area or came from that exact place; this is because they may have acquired a disease or parasite in your aquarium/pond and you could do much more harm than good. 😠 Do not allow any of your aquarium water or other contents to enter stormwater drains or go anywhere that might find its' way into a body of water e.g. creek or lake etc. The Australian government advice is to dispose of your water down the sink/toilet. 😠 Do not bring exotic animals into the country unless they are on the approved specimens list (link is below). 😠 Do not collect wild specimens unless you have checked first that you are allowed to do so. 😠 Do humanely euthanise your animals if/when necessary. (link is at the end of the article). 😊 Do enjoy keeping aquariums and treat your animals and our natural environment with the respect they deserve. Below are links to lists of noxious species and guides at a state and national level as well as links to RSPCA instructions for humane euthanisation Instructions for safe disposal of aquarium contents and animals and general guide to aquatic diseases - http://www.agriculture.gov.au/pests-diseases-weeds/aquatic/disease_watch_aquatic_animal_health_awareness/other_aquatic_biosecurity_materials National Guidelines for management of exotic fish trade including list of specimens suitable for import - http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade/exotics/exotic-fish-trade A.C.T. ???????? NSW Guide / Intro: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/freshwater-pests/ornamental-fish Full list of noxious species: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/noxious-fish-and-marine-vegetation N.T. Guide / Intro: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/about-aquatic-pests-and-biosecurity List of aquatic pests: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/list-of-aquatic-pests SA Guide / Intro: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests Full list of noxious species: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests/noxious_fish_list TAS Tasmania has especially strict requirements regarding importation of live animals. The three links below contain lots of relevant information (Thanks to @jayc for finding these) http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/animals-that-can-be-imported-with-entry-requirements/freshwater-aquarium-fish http://soer.justice.tas.gov.au/2009/indicator/84/index.php https://www.ifs.tas.gov.au/about-us/fishery-management/environment-and-conservation/prohibited-activities VIC Guide and list of noxious aquatic species: http://delwp.vic.gov.au/fishing-and-hunting/fisheries/marine-pests-and-diseases/noxious-aquatic-species-in-victoria QLD Guide / Intro: https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/fisheries/pest-fish/noxious-fish Full list of aquatic pests(refer to schedule 1 part 4 through 6): https://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/B/BiosecurityA14.pdf WA Guide / Intro: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx Full list of noxious species and proposed additions list can be found here: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx News article reporting on an incident of illegal shrimp importation: http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/taiwanese-student-jailed-for-illegally-importing-crystal-red-shrimps/news-story/f735730cdafd30cfb23f319bbe29215d?sv=d06fddccb50ab7281cfc7e74da630b8f Euthanisation Key Points / Summary: Not everyone can bring themselves to end the lives of their own animals but regardless; if you deem it necessary to end the life of any tank inhabitants and they are not a highly illegal specimen then please dp ask your local retailer first if they might be willing to try to save them for you. If this is not an option then please see below links. Humane euthanisation of fish: http://kb.rspca.org.au/what-is-the-most-humane-way-to-euthanase-aquarium-fish_403.html Humane euthanisation of crustaceans: http://kb.rspca.org.au/What-is-the-most-humane-way-to-kill-crustaceans-for-human-consumption_625.html disease-watch-brochure.pdf View full article
  2. Prohibited species and caring for our environment

    It is important that we as a community are responsible as hobbyists. Recent threats include the white spot virus that has been found in prawns in Queensland and the possibility that the crayfish plague has been introduced to our country via exotic crays from North America that might host this fungus and that have immunity to it. For example entire crayfish populations in Europe have been decimated by this disease because only the North American crays have immunity. It is well known that many in Australia keep and breed exotic shrimps and other creatures and in most cases this is not problematic but there are exceptions and so it is necessary that we have a handy resource on the forum that discusses this topic and provides relevant links. Australia has very strict quarantine laws; although we are allowed to keep and breed a number of different shrimps in Australia the importation of shrimp species not in the "suitable specimens for import" is extremely illegal and if you are caught you will almost certainly be handed a jail sentence. Local fish shops will often freely take any unwanted animals (even sick ones) and there are always plenty of other hobbyists who will jump at the chance to take them as well. Below are some simple rules that are universally applicable - 😠 Do not release any fish or invertebrate from your aquarium to nature regardless of whether it is native to the area or came from that exact place; this is because they may have acquired a disease or parasite in your aquarium/pond and you could do much more harm than good. 😠 Do not allow any of your aquarium water or other contents to enter stormwater drains or go anywhere that might find its' way into a body of water e.g. creek or lake etc. The Australian government advice is to dispose of your water down the sink/toilet. 😠 Do not bring exotic animals into the country unless they are on the approved specimens list (link is below). 😠 Do not collect wild specimens unless you have checked first that you are allowed to do so. 😠 Do humanely euthanise your animals if/when necessary. (link is at the end of the article). 😊 Do enjoy keeping aquariums and treat your animals and our natural environment with the respect they deserve. Below are links to lists of noxious species and guides at a state and national level as well as links to RSPCA instructions for humane euthanisation Instructions for safe disposal of aquarium contents and animals and general guide to aquatic diseases - http://www.agriculture.gov.au/pests-diseases-weeds/aquatic/disease_watch_aquatic_animal_health_awareness/other_aquatic_biosecurity_materials National Guidelines for management of exotic fish trade including list of specimens suitable for import - http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade/exotics/exotic-fish-trade A.C.T. ???????? NSW Guide / Intro: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/freshwater-pests/ornamental-fish Full list of noxious species: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/pests-diseases/noxious-fish-and-marine-vegetation N.T. Guide / Intro: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/about-aquatic-pests-and-biosecurity List of aquatic pests: https://nt.gov.au/marine/for-all-harbour-and-boat-users/aquatic-pests-marine-and-freshwater/list-of-aquatic-pests SA Guide / Intro: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests Full list of noxious species: http://pir.sa.gov.au/biosecurity/aquatics/aquatic_pests/noxious_fish_list TAS Tasmania has especially strict requirements regarding importation of live animals. The three links below contain lots of relevant information (Thanks to @jayc for finding these) http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals/animals-that-can-be-imported-with-entry-requirements/freshwater-aquarium-fish http://soer.justice.tas.gov.au/2009/indicator/84/index.php https://www.ifs.tas.gov.au/about-us/fishery-management/environment-and-conservation/prohibited-activities VIC Guide and list of noxious aquatic species: http://delwp.vic.gov.au/fishing-and-hunting/fisheries/marine-pests-and-diseases/noxious-aquatic-species-in-victoria QLD Guide / Intro: https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/fisheries/pest-fish/noxious-fish Full list of aquatic pests(refer to schedule 1 part 4 through 6): https://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/B/BiosecurityA14.pdf WA Guide / Intro: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx Full list of noxious species and proposed additions list can be found here: http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/Sustainability-and-Environment/Aquatic-Biosecurity/Translocations-Moving-Live-Fish/Pages/Noxious-Banned-Fish.aspx News article reporting on an incident of illegal shrimp importation: http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/taiwanese-student-jailed-for-illegally-importing-crystal-red-shrimps/news-story/f735730cdafd30cfb23f319bbe29215d?sv=d06fddccb50ab7281cfc7e74da630b8f Euthanisation Key Points / Summary: Not everyone can bring themselves to end the lives of their own animals but regardless; if you deem it necessary to end the life of any tank inhabitants and they are not a highly illegal specimen then please dp ask your local retailer first if they might be willing to try to save them for you. If this is not an option then please see below links. Humane euthanisation of fish: http://kb.rspca.org.au/what-is-the-most-humane-way-to-euthanase-aquarium-fish_403.html Humane euthanisation of crustaceans: http://kb.rspca.org.au/What-is-the-most-humane-way-to-kill-crustaceans-for-human-consumption_625.html disease-watch-brochure.pdf
  3. Hi, does anyone have any information on Australian Zebra Shrimp? I got a free one in a fish order and don't know anything about their care or size or anything! 😊 It'd an awesome looking shrimp. I have popped her in with my cherry shrimp, hope that's ok?!
  4. Thiara amarula - Spiny Marsh Snail

    Spiny Marsh Snail The Spiny Marsh Snail is an Australian native that is rarely found in the trade. This is a shame as it has an interesting shell shape and is well suited to aquarium life, providing a few simple conditions are met. The Spiny Marsh Snail was first described by Linneaus in 1758 as Helix amarula, with a subsequent remaining of the genus to Melania in 1822, and finally to Thiara in around 1943. It is found from the east coast of Africa, through Madagascar, north to the Philippines, through the Solomon and other Pacific Islands, and along the north-eastern coast of Australia (See Schutt & Glaubrecht, 1999 for a global distribution map). Given this widespread distribution, it is surprising that its distribution in Australia is limited. It is found from the Bloomfield River (south of Cooktown) to approximately 100km south of Cairns. Thus it is limited to around 6 major tributaries. The Spiny Marsh Snail is found in the lower freshwater sections of rivers, generally just above the tidal range. It is probably tolerant to low levels of salt as it would be exposed to brackish conditions in drought years, and therefore may be suitable for brackish aquaria. This requires further investigation. In its natural habitat, the Spiny Marsh Snail is found amongst rocks and pebbles, but also sandy areas, which is where I found them in the Johnstone River. In aquaria, they regularly bury themselves, especially when exposed to bright light. However in low light, or if the tank is densely planted or shaded, they are happy to move on top of the substrate and even climb the walls. This makes them useful for removing dead spots in substrates, but may mean they could dislodge plants in heavily planted aquaria, but I have not kept them under these conditions – something to watch for. I have noticed they are particularly active at night and may graze algae from the glass during this time. I've seen no indication that it eats plants, and indeed plants are generally absent from its natural habitat, other than Vallisneria or Aponogetons. They happily eat prepared foods (shrimp/fish food) as well as some greens (cucumber/zucchini). However, they seem to spend most of their time grazing. The Spiny Marsh Snail grows to a maximum size of approximately 50mm, perhaps slightly larger. From what I've seen, they are fairly slow growing and long lived. This makes them excellent candidates for aquaria, because unlike other pest snails, it makes it easier to control their numbers. Indeed breeding in aquaria is unlikely because it is thought the Spiny Marsh Snail releases planktonic larvae that move into the brackish/salty areas of rivers before migrating back up the river to settle. However, the true breeding habits of this snail are still unknown and present a challenge for aquarists. Nevertheless, these characteristics make it unlikely that the Spiny Marsh Snail would ever be a pest in aquaria. One condition that seems to be an absolute must for this snail is that pH needs to be 6.5 or above. In acidic conditions (pH < 6.0), the shell dissolves and the snails refuse to come out of their shells. If your snails are not active, check your pH. That said, this doesn't mean that they require lots of dissolved minerals (e.g. calcium carbonate). The TDS of the Johnson River where I found these was only 28 ppm at the time, so Spiny Marsh Snails may be the perfect tankmates for Neocaridina shrimp (cherries) and Australian native shrimp, but less so for Caridina (crystals, bees, etc.). So if you are after a snail that is good looking, hardy, a good algae eater, turns over the substrate, easy to feed, won't bloom into a pest population, is native and presents a breeding challenge, I highly encourage you to track down some Spiny Marsh Snails. Why not try a biotope tank with Vallisneria or Aponogetons and Caridina gracilirostris? Some additional material worth reading. Field trip to Johnson River, Queensland Australia with habitat description and pictures. http://www.naturkund...brecht_1999.pdf Atlas of Living Australia – shows the collection points of Thiara amarula in Australia. http://bie.ala.org.a...e-f394430ec676#
  5. Thiara amarula Spiny Marsh Snail The Spiny Marsh Snail is an Australian native that is rarely found in the trade. This is a shame as it has an interesting shell shape and is well suited to aquarium life, providing a few simple conditions are met. The Spiny Marsh Snail was first described by Linneaus in 1758 as Helix amarula, with a subsequent remaining of the genus to Melania in 1822, and finally to Thiara in around 1943. It is found from the east coast of Africa, through Madagascar, north to the Philippines, through the Solomon and other Pacific Islands, and along the north-eastern coast of Australia (See Schutt & Glaubrecht, 1999 for a global distribution map). Given this widespread distribution, it is surprising that its distribution in Australia is limited. It is found from the Bloomfield River (south of Cooktown) to approximately 100km south of Cairns. Thus it is limited to around 6 major tributaries. The Spiny Marsh Snail is found in the lower freshwater sections of rivers, generally just above the tidal range. It is probably tolerant to low levels of salt as it would be exposed to brackish conditions in drought years, and therefore may be suitable for brackish aquaria. This requires further investigation. In its natural habitat, the Spiny Marsh Snail is found amongst rocks and pebbles, but also sandy areas, which is where I found them in the Johnstone River. In aquaria, they regularly bury themselves, especially when exposed to bright light. However in low light, or if the tank is densely planted or shaded, they are happy to move on top of the substrate and even climb the walls. This makes them useful for removing dead spots in substrates, but may mean they could dislodge plants in heavily planted aquaria, but I have not kept them under these conditions – something to watch for. I have noticed they are particularly active at night and may graze algae from the glass during this time. I've seen no indication that it eats plants, and indeed plants are generally absent from its natural habitat, other than Vallisneria or Aponogetons. They happily eat prepared foods (shrimp/fish food) as well as some greens (cucumber/zucchini). However, they seem to spend most of their time grazing. The Spiny Marsh Snail grows to a maximum size of approximately 50mm, perhaps slightly larger. From what I've seen, they are fairly slow growing and long lived. This makes them excellent candidates for aquaria, because unlike other pest snails, it makes it easier to control their numbers. Indeed breeding in aquaria is unlikely because it is thought the Spiny Marsh Snail releases planktonic larvae that move into the brackish/salty areas of rivers before migrating back up the river to settle. However, the true breeding habits of this snail are still unknown and present a challenge for aquarists. Nevertheless, these characteristics make it unlikely that the Spiny Marsh Snail would ever be a pest in aquaria. One condition that seems to be an absolute must for this snail is that pH needs to be 6.5 or above. In acidic conditions (pH < 6.0), the shell dissolves and the snails refuse to come out of their shells. If your snails are not active, check your pH. That said, this doesn't mean that they require lots of dissolved minerals (e.g. calcium carbonate). The TDS of the Johnson River where I found these was only 28 ppm at the time, so Spiny Marsh Snails may be the perfect tankmates for Neocaridina shrimp (cherries) and Australian native shrimp, but less so for Caridina (crystals, bees, etc.). So if you are after a snail that is good looking, hardy, a good algae eater, turns over the substrate, easy to feed, won't bloom into a pest population, is native and presents a breeding challenge, I highly encourage you to track down some Spiny Marsh Snails. Why not try a biotope tank with Vallisneria or Aponogetons and Caridina gracilirostris? Some additional material worth reading. Field trip to Johnson River, Queensland Australia with habitat description and pictures. http://www.naturkund...brecht_1999.pdf Atlas of Living Australia – shows the collection points of Thiara amarula in Australia. http://bie.ala.org.a...e-f394430ec676# View full article
  6. Native Fish/Shrimp Set Up

    Scored myself an Aqua One Horizon 60 on Thursday, nice tank, 69l, 60cm x 32cm x 36cm, I saw it in the LFS and thought I'd grab it before the 'Useless' store owners decided to change the price of it like they do with other products, this is the same store that didn't know what kH, gH were and also charge $40.05 for an Aqua One Maxi 101f which I've seen elsewhere for $15.00 to $20.00 and also $20.00 for the smallest bottle of API Tap Water Conditioner... Paid $70.00 for it which I thought wasn't bad. So it's sitting here looking at me, the other tank I have which is doing a DSM is going well, I'll leave it for probably another month or two, probably two, so I was thinking I'd do this tank to keep me busy in the mean time, give me something to do. I'm going to go down the native tank path, thinking Spotted Blue Eyes, Riffle Shrimp, North Australian Chameleon Shrimp, Darwin Algae Shrimp, Darwin Red Nose Shrimp once the tank is planted and running well, plant wise I'm thinking Glossostigma elatinoides, Hydrocotyle tripartita, Lilaeopsis brisbanica, Vallisneria nana, but not sure what else, want to keep it some what simple, but appealing, not crowded, heavily planted with Glosso though, have a rough image in mind, will also use the left over Seiryu Stone I have, even though yes I know it isn't really native Australian lay out material, but might as well use it though. Thinking I'll use ADA Amazonia like I have in the other tank, also going to grab another Ista 60cm White LED when they come back in stock at The Tech Den, be nice to hear back from them. Thanks to @Baccus for the help with the Spotted Blue Eye and native shrimp questions also.
  7. Full Native tank

    Well the tank I call my "Native Tank" is now I think officially full. The little spotted blue eyes have been doing their thing and I recently just spied another 2 newborn fry and a slightly older one. I am hoping to eventually end up with a really decent sized self maintaining school of them. Sharing the tank are Blackmore River Shrimp which seem to go through phases of heaps and lots of babies down to a few, back up to a population explosion as it warms up again. The tank is heated of course other wise they would freeze in winter, but they still seem to decline or slow in breeding during winter. Then there are the Northern Australian Chameleon Shrimp also in the tank, I don't often get to see them but when I do they are always a pleasure. The tank is now also home to a group of Darwin Algae Shrimp, and most recently some Darwin Red Nose Shrimp. In all honesty I think instead of simply calling this tank my native tank I need to call it my NT tank. But then there is the snails that are sharing the tank with all the NT beauties. Slowly but steadily I have increased the notopala snails up to now 8 which has taken many hours of regular searching in a local stretch of river watching all the time for crocs. With the notopala snails I have also found some other gems, namely a HUGE type of long black snail along the lines of MTS, but these black ones are a LOT bigger and have pretty yellow spots on their bodies. The other snail of interest is a smaller snail again similar in shape to MTS and roughly around the same size but it has very defined blunt spikes on its rather chunky shell. Some of the spotted blue eyes The huge black snail The chunky little spiky snail And my Notopala species
  8. Hi guys, Can you please ID the first two photos - are they native (chameleon) shrimps? Or they are just cherry? I just notice they are a bit bigger than usual, with different eyes and visible strips on their spine area. What are distinguish features of native shrimp say chameleon and darwin algae? When I compared eggs shown in the Aquagreen website, they are black colour - is native shrimps have black colour eggs? Mine (ones I suspect native shrimps) have milky/white colour colour egg. http://postimg.org/image/plzg6iup5/ http://postimg.org/image/yh20nx8t5/ Lastly, I want to showcase the carbon rili I recently bought from Gbang through auction last week - they just arrived and they look fantastic. Nice colour though. http://postimg.org/image/mcw0f0lp9/
  9. As alluded to here: Bob and I found a few varieties of fern that may be suitable for use in aquaria. Here is the one we found in Little Mulgrave. In addition to the one pictured above, I have another two which are similar to java fern. This is the first of the two: The rhizome on this one is really thick, about as thick as my thumb. The centre leaf has grown since the plant has been underwater. So far growth has been really slow. Bob gave me this one to look after as it was sitting in one of his tanks. I don't know where he got it or what habitat it came from, so hopefully Bob will enlighten us. This one is currently in my Sunkist tank with typical cherry water parameters - TDS 200, ect ect. can't resist showing off my sunkists. thanks again @‌Bluebolts
  10. Caridina zebra pics

    I was one of the lucky people who set up a tank for our amazing native zebra shrimp recently, thanks to our forum hero Northboy who made some available. These are an amazing little shrimp that look very different to a CBS, despite the conflicting perception often voiced by those who haven't seen one yet. They have a reputation for being very difficult to keep going in captivity. Like anyone, I spent a great deal of time reading about the habitat and water parameters, previous experiences of those who have kept them and so on. Unfortunately there's little to read and no long-term success stories. You just have to hope for the best really. The tank was running for some time before I added the shrimp so had a healthy biofilm going and plenty of brown diatoms. I added some leaves from an outdoor container which had collected rainwater and autumn leaves over the last few months. I added a mixture of rainwater and tapwater which is pretty normal for me, both are processed through a carbon filter before reaching my tanks anyway. The tank has a thin layer, perhaps 3mm of fine white silica sand as a substrate and decaying leaves as the only real structure. I have one inert river rock in the tank, positioned to break the return from a HOB filter. Probably my least favorite style of filter yet I'm running 2 on this tank plus an air stone. The temperature is 22 +/- 1 degree C, pH essentially neutral, GH an KH undetectable, EC around 60uS (about 30ppm TDS). I have never felt any need to use RO water for any shrimp I keep, including Taiwan/Shadow Bees. However for these shrimp, it is just impossible to keep the TDS that low. I've already grabbed 20L of RO from a mate (thanks shrimply!) because the EC had gotten to around mid 70s (uS) and I felt that the shrimp were less happy then. I'll be buying an RO unit, the ability to remineralise with correct salts from virtually 0 will be a real advantage with these - as Fishmosy is already doing with his. The zebras are constantly picking away at the biofilm layer but do not seem to take any offered food. This is in contrast to what others have reported - snowflake, Boss Shrimp Crack, Mulberry leaves and Dandelion leaves have all been completely ignored in my tank. I can't explain this as yet - do they prefer biofilm and only accept other food when it's in short supply? Perhaps snails are taking the food in other tanks and actually nobody's zebras take prepared foods? There's surely other alternative explanations that haven't occurred to me yet. One thing is certain, mine are doing ok with just biofilm - the female in the pic above is clearly developing a saddle. In the shot of 2 shrimp above you can clearly see a hydra too, so it seems like they're doing ok without added food too. BTW I have been removing the leaves just before they really start to disintegrate to help keep the water clean. When the shrimp were sent down there was a couple of berried females as well as some small shrimp. These are growing well but the nice surprise was to find a new one the other day. I would say it's about a week or so old, definitely from one of the berried females and born in my tank: I don't know if there's more that made it - I saw this shrimp one day for about an hour and then it was gone. I perform a daily head count on the tank and while they're mostly out and I count to within 10% of the known population, there's plenty of places to hide in the leaves. They're also quite well camouflaged even on a plain white sand.
  11. Caridina sp. Malanda

    Recently I was lucky to get some specimens of an undescribed species of Australian native Caridina from "Northboy" Bob. Thanks Bob for the opportunity. I don't think many people are keeping these at this point but I hope that will change as they settle into captivity over the hopeful coming generations. Anyone with these shrimp is most welcome to post their pics or experiences here if they wish. This Malanda species is quite a heavily pigmented shrimp with a tendency for some individuals to have orange-red colours and others blue-greens. It seems that large females are at the blue end but I have a smaller, saddled individual that is currently orange so the difference seems not to be strictly sexual. Bob sent down a couple of berried females and from these I have juvies in the tank. The're all quite orange. Sorry for the poor quality, it's a tight crop and the best I could get at the time. Here's a couple more where you can see a bit of the bluish colour on the females. A hint of the pale bands on the abdominal segments are also visible in these and the first shot. It's quite a lovely species of shrimp with some nice potential to colour up much more.
  12. Hi everyone, I'd love to get some Caridina sp WA 4 - North Australian Chameleon shrimp for my aquarium but I'm having trouble finding people who sell them in WA. I have spoken to fisheries and they are happy for people to keep them as they are WA natives. Does anyone have any ideas where I might be able to get some? Cheers
  13. My new Riffles

    Years ago we had some riffle shrimp in a display tank at a shop I worked at - this was long before crystal reds or cherry shrimp had hit the scene. We used locally collected Paratya as algae grazers and Takashi Amano was using Caridina the same way. The riffles were amazing shrimp back then, something different to the glass clear Paratya we could collect. So much has changed since then, there was no "shrimp hobby" yet and no beautiful coloured shrimp to keep. I just got some Riffle Shrimp down from Fishmosy and they are just as beautiful and amazing as ever. All the competition from exotics has not diluted their charm one bit. Thanks for the lovely shrimp mate... They were a bit timid at first and especially shy when the lights were on. Now I've placed some driftwood right in the high current zone and they're very happy to sit there all day, every day - doing the "jazz hands" as they eat. There's some great photos of this species here on SKF and I'm afraid mine cannot compete. However if I can clean the glass sufficiently to get some better shots I will post them.
  14. Commonly known as the 'Ninja Shrimp', Caridina serratirostris has recently been reclassified as two independent but related shrimp by Dr Tim Page of Griffith University. “The final factor in the separation of the Ninja shrimp from serratirostris is based on the length of the stylocerite according to De Man’s works. This element varies depending on the populations of Caridina serratirostris and of Caridina celebensis, the distinction between the two species was questioned more than once.†Preferred conditions: Mean conditions from two collection sites (Northern Territory, Aus): pH ranges from 6.5 to 8 depending on rainfall and time of year. GH: 6 to 25 KH: Not detectable at either collection site. Temperature: 24 to 27°C, some areas get as warm as 29°C. Size: 1.8 - 2.4cm Males tend to be smaller like most Caridina species. Description: As the name suggests these guys are characterised by the Caridina typical body shape but with a “serra†serrati or rough/serrated “rostris†rostrum. “19 to 26 spikes from which a long segment that comprises 6 to 8 spikes behind the orbitsâ€. The colouration of the carapace is extremely variable and can range from red/orange through to red, brown and black in some specimens with areas of white or cream colouration on darker coloured specimens. Activity: Best in larger groups. They prefer a lower lit hardscape aquarium, or well shaded by plants, as this emulates their natural habitat more closely than a well lit manicured one. They generally seek hides or at least nooks during times of higher light. They are best observed under wide leafed or well grouped plants. Caridina serratirostris can be found in areas of higher water flow rates and their stocky build and short periopods and antennae are testament to this feature. Life span: Around 18 months. Similar to most other freshwater crustaceans of this size. Feeding: Omnivorous and opportunistic, with a strong vegetarian aspect. Dimorphism: The females are generally larger than the males showing better colouration. Holes in the inside of the third pair of pleopods can be noted with some serious inspection. This species uses an indirect type of reproduction that comprises larval stages in salt/brackish water, however successful reproduction entirely in freshwater regularly occurs. Click here to view the article
  15. Caridina serratirostris

    Commonly known as the 'Ninja Shrimp', Caridina serratirostris has recently been reclassified as two independent but related shrimp by Dr Tim Page of Griffith University. “The final factor in the separation of the Ninja shrimp from serratirostris is based on the length of the stylocerite according to De Man’s works. This element varies depending on the populations of Caridina serratirostris and of Caridina celebensis, the distinction between the two species was questioned more than once.†Preferred conditions: Mean conditions from two collection sites (Northern Territory, Aus): pH ranges from 6.5 to 8 depending on rainfall and time of year. GH: 6 to 25 KH: Not detectable at either collection site. Temperature: 24 to 27°C, some areas get as warm as 29°C. Size: 1.8 - 2.4cm Males tend to be smaller like most Caridina species. Description: As the name suggests these guys are characterised by the Caridina typical body shape but with a “serra†serrati or rough/serrated “rostris†rostrum. “19 to 26 spikes from which a long segment that comprises 6 to 8 spikes behind the orbitsâ€. The colouration of the carapace is extremely variable and can range from red/orange through to red, brown and black in some specimens with areas of white or cream colouration on darker coloured specimens. Activity: Best in larger groups. They prefer a lower lit hardscape aquarium, or well shaded by plants, as this emulates their natural habitat more closely than a well lit manicured one. They generally seek hides or at least nooks during times of higher light. They are best observed under wide leafed or well grouped plants. Caridina serratirostris can be found in areas of higher water flow rates and their stocky build and short periopods and antennae are testament to this feature. Life span: Around 18 months. Similar to most other freshwater crustaceans of this size. Feeding: Omnivorous and opportunistic, with a strong vegetarian aspect. Dimorphism: The females are generally larger than the males showing better colouration. Holes in the inside of the third pair of pleopods can be noted with some serious inspection. This species uses an indirect type of reproduction that comprises larval stages in salt/brackish water, however successful reproduction entirely in freshwater regularly occurs.