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Found 18 results

  1. Dashrimp

    Overfeeding?

    I have 18 shrimp in a 90l tank. They have never shown much interest in any food I give them. I give them a pinch of spirulina every 3 days and three or four pellets of JBL Novo Prawn. I've tried blanched vegetables, hibiscus flowers etc and the ignore them all. Dies this mean they have enough biofilm? I have thousands of detritus worms, including some which are swimming about in the water column, which would suggest I am overfeeding, though this seems hard to imagine with the tiny amount I am putting in. A couple of RCS females are berried so I am reluctant to give up the spirulina as I don't want the shrimplets to lack food when they arrive.
  2. Hi all. I'm a newbie. I'm keeping a 90 litre tank with cherry shrimp and daphnia together. I'm feeding them spirulina and commercial shrimp food. Does anyone know what else I should be feeding them? Anyone else have this mix of tankmates?
  3. Madmerv

    Mulberry Madness

    Thanks to the guys at Shrimp Love Mulberry i recently received a pack of the new Mulberry based shrimp food. The pack contained 4 syringes of mulberry shrimp food and an instruction card for storage and feeding. Nothing to complicated there, just store the syringe you are using in the fridge and the spare ones in the freezer. Great being able to freeze the syringe and all as you know it is not going to go off so you can order enough for 6 months or more and that will save on shipping costs. So like with any new aquarium product i headed straight to the shrimp tank to give it a go. My thinking at the time was that the product would be a bit like Repashy but softer so it could be easily syringed. My tank has a good flow in it so it is always a bit hit and miss dropping food from the surface to the feeding bowl, like wafers or crack, but i'm getting pretty good at hitting the mark. I held the syringe at about the right point to get the bowl and gave it a little squeeze. This is not how you do it...Lol The product came out in a nice tube about 2-3mm wide, like a soft bit of crack, and then hit the flow of water. It then turned into a snow of mulberry goodness as it fell through the water column and was evenly distributed throughout the entire tank. This is not a problem for giving the shrimp a general feed, providing you dont over feed, but there was now no way i could see if the shrimp were attracted to it specifically so i could give it a subjective review. The shrimp got excited as they knew there was food somewhere in the tank but i think it took 10sec for every shrimp in the tank to find some of it and settle down for a munch. A few days later it went a lot better. Getting the hands wet i put a bit into the feeding bowl and sat back with the camera ready. My display tank has a mix of RCS, Native WA Glassies and a few Pygmy Cories. I have found that the Palamonties Australis are more of a carnivore than RCS and will rather eat live black worms than actual shrimp food. Fortunately, or unfortunately for a review, the much larger glass shrimp got into the food bowl first and the RCS were kept at bay until it had it's fill. I had put in about enough food for a normal 3-4 day feed and it was gone in about 2 hours. My normal harder food last about 6-8 hours for the same amount. Future feeds will be done from the surface again as i dont over feed and the distribution in the tank ensures all the shrimp, even the new ones, dont get muscled out.
  4. Zebra

    Good algae.

    Hello, just wanted to show another food source I grow for my shrimp and snails. Algae. Just how it looks, a plastic tub filled that gets lots of direct sun, I usually fill it with old water from my planted tanks to help the process. Its a bit full ATM lol but there's a second tub underneath for extra strength. I just grab a small pinch and put it straight in my shrimp tanks, they all go nuts for it. Alternatively you could remove excess water then dehydrate it on baking paper to make a dry feed. An hour or 2 later:
  5. I picked up a packet of Hikari Crab Cuisine at the LFS and then noticed it contains copper sulfate. I was thinking of feeding some to my neocaridina davidi var. orange until I noticed the copper sulfate in the ingredients. Plus, I realize now Hikari also makes shrimp cuisine but I believe it also contains copper sulfate. The only thing the shrimpettes have ever been fed is biofilm and Marineland Color Enhancing Flakes which supposedly does not contain copper according to the company. Am I taking chances feeding the Hikari Crab Cuisine to them? Or, is this the type of copper that is actually good for them in small amounts?
  6. Hello, so I was going to put this in diy but figured anyone can make food so its not really a diy, the more important aspect I guess I want to share or discuss is the nutrition side of things. Heres my diy shrimp/ fish food, Especially great for getting meds into your beloved critters. I in no way copied instructions on how to do this so I'm taking aaaaalll the creds lol. "Narcasist" What you'll need: (buy organic where possible but doesn't really matter) A blender(or preferably stick blender) Baking paper An oven and fan(preferably a dehydrator if you or nana has one) Garlic (preferably fresh-not minced) Nori Seaweed sheets for sushi Spirulina powder dry yeast(preferably nutritional yeast) Soybean husk(shrimp snow) Boiled sweet potatoe First blend up all your dry ingedients one by one into a course power. Then blend your garlic with a little bit of water, before adding it to your dry ingedients. Mix everything together well and add enough water to reach a "wet toothepaste" consistancy. Keep track of the quantities you've added and write them down for next time. Preheat your oven to about 160c and place a large room fan in front of you oven with the door open just slightly, your oven is now a ghetto dyhydrator lol Spread your mix out on a sheet of baking paper. Place another sheet on top and use a rolling pin to flatten it right out. The thinner you make it the faster and better it dries- this needs to be fully 100 percent "cracker" dry as it is high in protein and will foul very fast if not dried properly- drying temps we use come close to pasteurisation temps so it is actually quite a sterile way to make clean food that won't go bad fast. Once it's dry enough- (You will be able to easily peel away the top sheet of baking paper without much sticking.) Start breaking it up into smaller pieces so it dries more efficiently. When it's fully "cracker dry" and crumbles between your fingers it's done, this takes only 1-2 hours and can be done without having to check it if you use a proper dehydrator. (Great investment if you plant to do this often.) Store in air type bags to reduce moisture and oxygen exposure. First introduction to my RCS: (the tanks a mess right now "shame" 10min later.... gone. Haha they showed massive interest so have all my Bettas. Hope you guys like it.
  7. From the Dennerle website: Ingredients: Leave your experiences and star rating in the review tab.
  8. From the Dennerle website: Ingredients: Leave your experiences and star rating in the review tab. View full article
  9. s1l3nt

    Microworms - Live food culture

    Ever wondered what that sweet bread dough smell is coming from your neighbours fish room? Read on to find out the secret to that beautiful (to each their own right?) smell! Microworms are an easy to culture and maintain live food for your small/micro fish and especially for small fry. Size wise they fall somewhere between vinegar eels and baby brine shrimp (BBS) so is a good transition food prior to BBS. Nutrition wise they are a solid food source, but the fatty content may be a little on the higher side I believe so should not be a staple food permanently. Feeding a range of foods is best for the health of your fish and other aquatic friends. NOTE: Microworms sink fairly fast so be aware of this. They will also live a fairly long time in a fish tank, personally I have seen mine alive as long as 48 hours. But I would err on the side of caution and estimate a 24 hour “alive” time in a tank. Microworms can be cultured in a various mediums such as oats, bread, potato peelings, etc. Personally I use and prefer using white bread with the crusts cut off. The reason I prefer this method is because there is a much less foul smell as the culture matures, and even less of a foul smell when the culture crashes. It gives of a sour smell when it goes bad but otherwise smells yeasty similar to bread dough. Cultures can crash fairly easily in my experience and no one likes a horrible smell in their house/room/shed/etc… I haven’t used bread crusts because they are usually coated in oil or similar to give the golden colour which causes a bit of a messy culture. Now onto the fun part, finding out how it is done! What you will need: - Some form of container. I use take away containers. - Bakers yeast. I use the Tandaco branded dry yeast which comes in small satchels will last quite a while… Real reason is that my wife uses it…. :) - Bread with crusts cut off. I use any brand that is on hand, doesn’t matter. - A starter culture of micro worms. I have these available for anyone interested :) - Water. Tap water is fine, and is what I use. Though it is possible to use tank water or milk (but milk smells worse in my experience). NOTE: You should always work with at least 2 cultures in the event one decides to crash that day when your fry are ready to feed! Steps to starting your culture: - Grab your bread with the crusts off and wet it with tap water. (You don’t want it soaking wet but rather similar to battering fish. Wet on both sides but not dripping or drenched throughout.) - Line your container with at least 1 layer of bread. (I find I have the most success with one layer personally but have used multiple in the past.) - Grab your starter culture and spread it over the bread. - Sprinkle some bakers yeast over the bread and the starter culture worms. - Put your lid on with some holes in it to allow oxygen exchange. (You can use filter wool loosely in the holes to prevent bugs/flies/etc from getting into your culture. - Wait a couple of days (if you have a good sized starter culture, they are ready within 24 hours) for the worms to do their magic. - Worms will climb the walls of the container, all you need to do then is use something like a pipette or your finger or similar to collect as many worms as needed. (I use the side of a pipette and put the worms into a small feeding container and then use the pipette to feed the fry/fish with a controlled amount of worms). - Reap rewards, benefits, remind everyone of this awesome information and spread those culture because you will lose them at some point! We all do… :) Maintaining your culture: - You can prepare a slice of bread the same way as when you started a culture and drop this with a little bit of yeast ontop of your culture that is doing well. This will feed your worms further as they will eventually eat all the food you gave them in the beginning. (I find I can do this 1-2 times per culture before I have to start a fresh culture and use these worms as a large starter culture (don’t use the entire culture…)). NOTE: You can let your culture go dry and eventually wet it with tank water and drop some bread with yeast ontop and they will start a culture all over again. I believe this is because the worms lay eggs. Approximate Nutritional Values: Protein: 48% Fat: 21% Glycogen: 7% Orgainic Acids: 1% Nucleic Acids: 1% Please note - If you would like to share this article or use it outside of SKF please contact me for permission first. Thank you! NOTE: I am currently working on an aquatic hobby based website which will contain lots of information on things such as breeding fish, shrimp, live foods, nutritional values of foods, fish profiles, etc. Keep an eye out for this post but the website will be live as soon as I can possibly do so. The website is www.aquapixel.com.au
  10. Ever wondered what that sweet bread dough smell is coming from your neighbours fish room? Read on to find out the secret to that beautiful (?) smell! Ever wondered what that sweet bread dough smell is coming from your neighbours fish room? Read on to find out the secret to that beautiful (to each their own right?) smell! Microworms are an easy to culture and maintain live food for your small/micro fish and especially for small fry. Size wise they fall somewhere between vinegar eels and baby brine shrimp (BBS) so is a good transition food prior to BBS. Nutrition wise they are a solid food source, but the fatty content may be a little on the higher side I believe so should not be a staple food permanently. Feeding a range of foods is best for the health of your fish and other aquatic friends. NOTE: Microworms sink fairly fast so be aware of this. They will also live a fairly long time in a fish tank, personally I have seen mine alive as long as 48 hours. But I would err on the side of caution and estimate a 24 hour “alive” time in a tank. Microworms can be cultured in a various mediums such as oats, bread, potato peelings, etc. Personally I use and prefer using white bread with the crusts cut off. The reason I prefer this method is because there is a much less foul smell as the culture matures, and even less of a foul smell when the culture crashes. It gives of a sour smell when it goes bad but otherwise smells yeasty similar to bread dough. Cultures can crash fairly easily in my experience and no one likes a horrible smell in their house/room/shed/etc… I haven’t used bread crusts because they are usually coated in oil or similar to give the golden colour which causes a bit of a messy culture. Now onto the fun part, finding out how it is done! What you will need: - Some form of container. I use take away containers. - Bakers yeast. I use the Tandaco branded dry yeast which comes in small satchels will last quite a while… Real reason is that my wife uses it…. :) - Bread with crusts cut off. I use any brand that is on hand, doesn’t matter. - A starter culture of micro worms. I have these available for anyone interested :) - Water. Tap water is fine, and is what I use. Though it is possible to use tank water or milk (but milk smells worse in my experience). NOTE: You should always work with at least 2 cultures in the event one decides to crash that day when your fry are ready to feed! Steps to starting your culture: - Grab your bread with the crusts off and wet it with tap water. (You don’t want it soaking wet but rather similar to battering fish. Wet on both sides but not dripping or drenched throughout.) - Line your container with at least 1 layer of bread. (I find I have the most success with one layer personally but have used multiple in the past.) - Grab your starter culture and spread it over the bread. - Sprinkle some bakers yeast over the bread and the starter culture worms. - Put your lid on with some holes in it to allow oxygen exchange. (You can use filter wool loosely in the holes to prevent bugs/flies/etc from getting into your culture. - Wait a couple of days (if you have a good sized starter culture, they are ready within 24 hours) for the worms to do their magic. - Worms will climb the walls of the container, all you need to do then is use something like a pipette or your finger or similar to collect as many worms as needed. (I use the side of a pipette and put the worms into a small feeding container and then use the pipette to feed the fry/fish with a controlled amount of worms). - Reap rewards, benefits, remind everyone of this awesome information and spread those culture because you will lose them at some point! We all do… :) Maintaining your culture: - You can prepare a slice of bread the same way as when you started a culture and drop this with a little bit of yeast ontop of your culture that is doing well. This will feed your worms further as they will eventually eat all the food you gave them in the beginning. (I find I can do this 1-2 times per culture before I have to start a fresh culture and use these worms as a large starter culture (don’t use the entire culture…)). NOTE: You can let your culture go dry and eventually wet it with tank water and drop some bread with yeast ontop and they will start a culture all over again. I believe this is because the worms lay eggs. Approximate Nutritional Values: Protein: 48% Fat: 21% Glycogen: 7% Orgainic Acids: 1% Nucleic Acids: 1% Please note - If you would like to share this article or use it outside of SKF please contact me for permission first. Thank you! NOTE: I am currently working on an aquatic hobby based website which will contain lots of information on things such as breeding fish, shrimp, live foods, nutritional values of foods, fish profiles, etc. Keep an eye out for this post but the website will be live as soon as I can possibly do so. The website is www.aquapixel.com.au View full article
  11. Dan_97

    Growing Kale for your Shrimp

    Kale is a great snack for you shrimp, plus it contains approximately 135mg of calcium per 100g. Kale can be dried, blanched or fed fresh to you shrimp. If you plan to grow it yourself simply purchase a packet of seeds or seedlings at your local hardware store or nursery and follow these steps to ensure you grow large, healthy kale. Growing Kale Kale can be planted anytime of the year but is best planted in soil temperatures of 10c to 30c. If you chose to purchase seeds chose a large pot or garden bed to plant them in, making sure it is in partial sun in summer and full sun in winter. The pot or garden bed should be at least 20 square centimetres for a few plants but for more, larger is better, I prefer a 50cm, circular pot. Kale will grow in commercial potting mix but the addition of fertilizers is always a good addition to kick start you kale. Sow the seeds one centimetre deep, planting the seeds a few centimetres apart and keeping the rows fifty centimetres apart. If you need to you can later transplant seedlings to allow more room. Keep the soil moist and within five to fourteen days your kale should germinate and within eight to ten weeks it should be ready to harvest but may be harvested before if needed/wanted. Some Red Russian Kale, approximately three weeks old Pests and Diseases Kale is fairly resistant to pests and diseases but are susceptible to white cabbage caterpillars. Picking them and dried and withered leaves is your best defence as using pesticides will more than likely harm you shrimp. Feeding You can feed to kale to your shrimp fresh, blanched or dried depending on your preference. If blanching, you should boil for approximately one and a half minutes. When feeding, keep the kale down with a wooden/bamboo skewer or tie it to a rock. Your shrimp will love the kale and jump on it as soon as it goes into the tank. Happy Shrimping!!
  12. zn30

    SHRIMP STICKS

    I have been feeding my shrimp, Shrimp Sticks from the Tropical range, since I have been keeping shrimp they love them the CRS swim away with the sticks to feed on them in peace. This link will take you straight to the information for Shrimp Sticks. http://www.tropical.pl/en/products/aquarium/foods/premium-line/bottom-feeders-foods/shrimp-sticks/ The link is self explanatory. I feed my fish a variety of foods from this range, my fish are healthier than they ever have been after using this product for the last three years. Have a look at the link and browse all foods available for your own needs. I am lucky enough to get mine from a LFS that keep the prices affordable for this brand of foods.
  13. Cornell333

    What's the better shrimp foods?

    Hey guys, i have quite a few shrimp. And just looking to find out what commercially available foods are the best to use. As it seems a lot of people don't seem to like them all. Also how often are people feeding their shrimp? Thanks
  14. I would like to start a conversation on whether the golden rule for shrimp keeping : "Shrimp don't like change" applies to diet and feeding as well? I have received some great advice from Disciple and would like to find out what the consensus and experience is out there with different shrimp varieties. In the natural habitat, the diet will be quite consistent in terms of micro organisms, leaf litter types, pollens, insects etc and I am beginning to think that I have been approaching my feeding of my colonies incorrectly. I feed my shrimp different foods in rotation everyday to make up for as much potential nutrient deficiencies compared to what they might find in nature as I am concerned that in the long term I might risk giving my shrimp a deficiency of some obscure mineral like Boron as example, so I compensate with ridiculous amounts of variety in foods. I need to stress that I do not overfeed. I am wondering whether the shrimp might perhaps prefer the predictability of routine? As an example, only happening in my large 240l TB tank, everyday late afternoon, the shrimp start waiting at the food bowl area- approx 80 percent if my shrimp hang around the feed arena from about 5pm... What are your thoughts and experiences?
  15. Thinking of using organic Chlorella powder to feed new born shrimplets. The powder is very very fine and would defiantly be manageable for the littlest of shrimp. My only concern is that it will foul the water faster then my current baby food, Biozyme so care would be needed not to over feed. Thoughts?
  16. Kale is a great snack for you shrimp, plus it contains approximately 135mg of calcium per 100g. Kale can be dried, blanched or fed fresh to you shrimp. If you plan to grow it yourself simply purchase a packet of seeds or seedlings at your local hardware store or nursery and follow these steps to ensure you grow large, healthy kale. Growing Kale Kale can be planted anytime of the year but is best planted in soil temperatures of 10c to 30c. If you chose to purchase seeds chose a large pot or garden bed to plant them in, making sure it is in partial sun in summer and full sun in winter. The pot or garden bed should be at least 20 square centimetres for a few plants but for more, larger is better, I prefer a 50cm, circular pot. Kale will grow in commercial potting mix but the addition of fertilizers is always a good addition to kick start you kale. Sow the seeds one centimetre deep, planting the seeds a few centimetres apart and keeping the rows fifty centimetres apart. If you need to you can later transplant seedlings to allow more room. Keep the soil moist and within five to fourteen days your kale should germinate and within eight to ten weeks it should be ready to harvest but may be harvested before if needed/wanted. Some Red Russian Kale, approximately three weeks old Pests and Diseases Kale is fairly resistant to pests and diseases but are susceptible to white cabbage caterpillars. Picking them and dried and withered leaves is your best defence as using pesticides will more than likely harm you shrimp. Feeding You can feed to kale to your shrimp fresh, blanched or dried depending on your preference. If blanching, you should boil for approximately one and a half minutes. When feeding, keep the kale down with a wooden/bamboo skewer or tie it to a rock. Your shrimp will love the kale and jump on it as soon as it goes into the tank. Happy Shrimping!! Click here to view the article
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