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    • bristlenose
      By bristlenose
      Hi, I've kept Red cherry shrimp for at least 3 years. I've never had a problem with them. I used to keep my shrimp in 500l tank but i got careless while buying plants and introduced planaria into my aquarium. I only noticed after the numbers got out of hand and i noticed the shrimp deaths adding up. I moved 200-300 shrimp into a standard 4ft tank planted aquarium and dosed with noplanaria along with melafix to ward off any bacterial infections. There were multiple dozens of shrimp shells all over after being moved. Initially i believed it may have been the planaria/bacterial/constant water changes/stress of new environment(i drip acclimated them for a 5 hours) that was killing them but i haven't changed the water in a 2 months but i still get the occasional death, 1 or 2 every few days. There are decent amounts of cuttlebone in the filter and also in the aquarium itself, and i also feed them the occasional powdered egg shells but i still get molting problems. Adults and also the month olds are dying, no discrimination. They're fed every other day shrimp snow, high protein discus granules and zucchini/pumpkin/spinach/dry seaweed every 3-4 days. I can see many berried females and small shrimp and also babies but i'm still losing shrimp constantly, easily 80+ in total. I don't want to buy a gh/kh test, they have never had any problems with molting in their last aquarium so can't quite understand why they're having problems now in the 150l. I've read so much online but i can't seem to find an answer, i'd sincerely appreciate any advice i can get. Thank you so much if you've managed to read all of this. Please feel free to ask any questions. The photo is from the current setup they're in.
      Previous tank parameters:
      Ammonia: 0 
      nitrite: 0 
      nitrates: 20ppm
      Ph: 8
      substrate: sand 
      Lighting: generic LED lights i got off ebay
      I don't know any other parameters.  cuttlebone in the tank and filter, no ferts, heavily infested with guppy grass. Large colony of bristlenose. 
      New tank parameters:
      ammonia: 0
      Nitrite: 0
      Nitrates:30-40ppm 
      co2: 3-4 bps 
      Ph: 6.5
      Lighting: generic LED lights i got off ebay
      substrate: ada aquasoil
      The new tank is heavily planted and dosed with root tabs and liquid ferts. Cuttlebone in the tank and filter. 6 large pieces of seiryu stone 17kg (i doubt they're authentic so they're some kind of limestone) Shrimp only tank
       

    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Aquariums make a wonderful hobby. They are soothing, interesting and can provide a lot of fun and entertainment. However, in order to make the most of your aquarium, taking proper care of it is exceptionally important. It must be maintained, and part of proper maintenance is understanding issues that can develop.
      One of the side effects of improper aquarium maintenance is the development of pests, and Hydra oligactis – more commonly referred to as just hydra is one of the most dangerous. Also known as freshwater polyps, these pests hail from the Coelenterata family of aquatic invertebrates. They have a tubular body and a sticky foot located on one end and tentacles on the other end. The tentacles contain stinging cells, which the hydra uses to immobilize its’ prey.
      Why Hydra are Dangerous in Aquariums
      Though hydras are basic creatures that lack a brain, a respiratory system or even musculature, they are a real threat to aquariums. As mentioned, they use their stinging tentacles to immobilize their prey and are able to kill and eat fish fry and even adult fish. Additionally, they reproduce very quickly, creating buds that turn into new hydra that eventually break off on their own. And, though they do tend to stay in one place (using their sticky foot to secure them to a surface,) they can easily move around if they choose.
      Given their ability to eat fish, how quickly they reproduce and that they can move about when they want, it’s easy to see why hydra are a real issue in an aquarium.
      Treating Hydra in an Aquarium
      Once an aquarium has infiltrated an aquarium, they can be hard to eradicate; however, getting rid of them is possible. The treatment for these pests depends on the extent of the infestation.
      If the infestation is relatively small, you may actually be able to physically remove them. If they have taken up residence on plants and rocks, they can be killed by removing the plants and rocks and sock them in a solution of 10 percent bleach and 90 percent water for about 15 minutes. After soaking, rinse the plants and rocks with fresh water and let them air dry.
      If you are looking for a less intrusive method of removal that will not disturb the aquarium, you can do so by introducing fish that will eat the pests. Mollies, Paradise fish and Spot (blue) Gouramis are known to favor hydra and can rid an aquarium of them.
      Heat is another option that can be used to treat an infestation of hydra. With this treatment method, the fish must be removed from the tank first. Once they are removed, increase the temperature of the water to 40°C (104°F) for a few hours. This will essentially cook the hydra and kill them. Turn the temperature of the water down, clean the gravel and change the water. Ensure that the temperature of the water is safe for the fish before reintroducing them.
      Chemicals and medicines can also be used to treat hydra; however, do keep in mind that they can be harmful to aquatic life. Copper Sulfate and Potassium Permanganate are two of the most common and safest options in fish only aquariums.
      Also take a look at the following article regarding common medication used in aquariums:
      Image credit: 
      Wikipedia: Hydra oligactis

      View full article
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Aquariums make a wonderful hobby. They are soothing, interesting and can provide a lot of fun and entertainment. However, in order to make the most of your aquarium, taking proper care of it is exceptionally important. It must be maintained, and part of proper maintenance is understanding issues that can develop.
      One of the side effects of improper aquarium maintenance is the development of pests, and Hydra oligactis – more commonly referred to as just hydra is one of the most dangerous. Also known as freshwater polyps, these pests hail from the Coelenterata family of aquatic invertebrates. They have a tubular body and a sticky foot located on one end and tentacles on the other end. The tentacles contain stinging cells, which the hydra uses to immobilize its’ prey.
      Why Hydra are Dangerous in Aquariums
      Though hydras are basic creatures that lack a brain, a respiratory system or even musculature, they are a real threat to aquariums. As mentioned, they use their stinging tentacles to immobilize their prey and are able to kill and eat fish fry and even adult fish. Additionally, they reproduce very quickly, creating buds that turn into new hydra that eventually break off on their own. And, though they do tend to stay in one place (using their sticky foot to secure them to a surface,) they can easily move around if they choose.
      Given their ability to eat fish, how quickly they reproduce and that they can move about when they want, it’s easy to see why hydra are a real issue in an aquarium.
      Treating Hydra in an Aquarium
      Once an aquarium has infiltrated an aquarium, they can be hard to eradicate; however, getting rid of them is possible. The treatment for these pests depends on the extent of the infestation.
      If the infestation is relatively small, you may actually be able to physically remove them. If they have taken up residence on plants and rocks, they can be killed by removing the plants and rocks and sock them in a solution of 10 percent bleach and 90 percent water for about 15 minutes. After soaking, rinse the plants and rocks with fresh water and let them air dry.
      If you are looking for a less intrusive method of removal that will not disturb the aquarium, you can do so by introducing fish that will eat the pests. Mollies, Paradise fish and Spot (blue) Gouramis are known to favor hydra and can rid an aquarium of them.
      Heat is another option that can be used to treat an infestation of hydra. With this treatment method, the fish must be removed from the tank first. Once they are removed, increase the temperature of the water to 40°C (104°F) for a few hours. This will essentially cook the hydra and kill them. Turn the temperature of the water down, clean the gravel and change the water. Ensure that the temperature of the water is safe for the fish before reintroducing them.
      Chemicals and medicines can also be used to treat hydra; however, do keep in mind that they can be harmful to aquatic life. Copper Sulfate and Potassium Permanganate are two of the most common and safest options in fish only aquariums.
      Also take a look at the following article regarding common medication used in aquariums:
      Image credit: 
      Wikipedia: Hydra oligactis
    • skfadmin
      By skfadmin
      HYDRA Some facts!!!
      Hydra are a fresh water animal that belongs to the same group as jellyfish, corals and anemones, The name Hydra stems from Greek mythology. It was the name given to a many headed sea serpent. The hydra that we know resembles this mythological monster by its many tentacles.
      Hydra are found in nearly all clean fresh water systems in Australia and around the world . They have a range of colours from brown, green white, and many other variations .
      Many people have Hydra in their aquariums, but are unaware of their presence. They are very small approx. 2 - 3 mm in length ( but can extend to around 1cm when hunting) when hanging from the underneath of leaves of water plants are hard to distinguish

      A Hydra infestation does not just mysteriously appear in your aquarium and is not caused by poor tank maintenance or anything like that. The animal has to be introduced from some external source.
      It is usually introduced to aquariums from plants ,wood, rocks etc collected from wild creeks, rivers lakes and billabongs.
      Hydra have a sack shaped body that consists of a mouth /anus combination on the top surrounded by a crown of tentacles that carry an array of stinging cells.
      on the bottom of the tube body there is a "foot" ( basal Disk)a device the animal uses to anchor itself to plants ,rocks aquarium walls and the like.
      Hydra live attached to vegetation, rocks and walls by this "foot" with all its tentacles suspended into the water waiting for it's pray to blunder into them. Small animals that happen to blunder into the tentacles are stung and paralysed.
      within a short time all of the tentacles are wrapped around the victim conflicting many more stings. the victim is then drawn to the mouth and swallowed. Digestion is done over a period of several hours .Any un digested material remaining after this period is then expelled back through the mouth.
      The hydra is then ready to hunt again .
      It takes several hours for their weapons to recharge which it does while digesting it's food. Small aquatic animals like Rotifers, insect larvae, and ( especially) small crustaceans such as daphnia, seed shrimp and water flee, are their main pray.

      Hydra do not always stay in the one spot in the aquarium. they are able to move about in a couple of ways. They are able to secrete a sticky mass under the basal disk and they use this fluid to kind of slide themselves along to a new position. Another way is they detach the basal disk, bend over placing their tentacles on the substrate and then somersaulting re attaching the "foot" further along, they will continue to do this action until they reach their preferred position.
      The third manoeuvre noted is that they are able to produce an air bubble in the basal disk this raises them to the top of the water where they hang suspended waiting for pray.

      Hydra do most of their reproduction in the summer months. Most reproduction is "A" Sexual and involves a process called "Budding" in which a new Hydra develops as a bud on the parent central column . When conditions are right the bud breaks loose and continues life as an individual. These offspring are genetically identical to the parent ( true clones) .
      Under very good conditions hydra may possess several buds at various stages of development. Sexual reproduction is usually confined to the cooler months. Ovaries develop as an oval swelling near the column base. testis form as conical protrusions further up the column the sperm is free floating and can fertilize itself and other hydra. the young develop directly without a larval stage. HYDRA are beautiful but a bit annoying creatures.
      Given their reproductive abilities, their capability for moving around when they choose and the ability to eat pray several times their size. it's clear why hydra are not welcome in freshwater aquariums .
      They are believed to be able to cause harm or kill newly hatched shrimp, and in laboratory conditions they have been proven to eat baby brine shrimp. Adult shrimp are not effected by hydra stings except possibly as an annoyance. The larger Hydra have also been shown to eat small fish fry as large as newly borne guppies . Once hydra are introduced into an aquarium they can be difficult to get rid of them. ( but it's not impossible) If you are lucky to only have a small infestation you should be able to physically remove them, I removed the infestation that I had by wiping the tank sides down with a clean cloth, removed all rocks ,wood, from the tank and scrubbed them, plants I soaked in a light bleach solution for around 10 minutes before rinsing in fresh water and replacing. Another non intrusive way is to add some fish to eat them Gouramis or mollies will do the trick. ( not a good idea if you keep shrimp).
      Heat is another method. ( you have to remove all your livestock to do this) heat your aquarium water to around 40C for about 2 hours. this should kill them, Perform a minimum 50% water change and make sure that the water temp is back to normal before returning your live stock .
      Chemicals that can be used are potassium permanganate, or many of the fish anti fluke medications especially if they contain formalin. WARNING THESE CHEMICALS MAY BE HARMFUL TO SHRIMP, SNAILS, PLANTS and sometimes FISH. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!! Some preventative measures are to inspect all live plants carefully( look for small jelly like substances) soak all plants in an approved solution before adding them to your aquarium. Avoid live foods from local rivers creeks etc. Boil all substrate wood rocks collected from the wild before adding to your tank .
      References used :- Bugguide Version Jan 2009 Information sources Wikipedia. org/wiki/imdra Williams 1980 Pennak 1989 Gooderham & Syrlin 2002 Offwell Woodland & wildlife Trust UK Researcher Wayne Summerhayes Febuary 2013.
    • VaultBoy
      By VaultBoy
      Hi everyone, I have a bit of a problem (i think...) I seem to have added freshwater hydra into my tank somehow and have noticed massive population increase at the same time as I have had blue dreams, tb, pinto and crs mischlings all release babies. For a bit of perspective, the tank is only about 3 months old but was started with mature substrate and filter media so I could cycle it more quickly as I had to get my shrimp in there asap. I am new to keeping all of the variants in this tank but have kept an RCS colony for 3-4 years so wanted to try new things in a shrimp only tank.
      So my questions are...
      Do I actually have a problem? Are the hydra going to eat the babies?
      If they are a problem then how do I get rid of them? I dont want to introduce any fish, cant really remove all shrimp/shrimplets to heat the water enough to kill them and I dont think there are any shrimp safe medicated solutions... Please help me!
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    • sdlTBfanUK
      That sounds like a good plan, I might even get 5 ot 6 as they are quite small! Simon
    • Hammy
      Thanks I’ve no problem with waiting it’s part of the hobby really. I was actually looking at the Ottos on line and was thinking of getting some so to have you guys mention them makes me happy. However it says online that they are happier being in a group rather than just one or two so do you think that I could have say 3 or 4 in my 64ltr tank 
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I have 3 tanks at the moment, Tank 1 - bloody mary shrim with neon and ember tetras, though 90% of the shrimp are wild type now! Tank 2 - the old taiwan bee shrimp tank, has 11 mosquito rasbora and 1 killie with wild type cherry shrimp, I have just done the maintenance on that tank and there are definitely shrimp still doing well (I don't feed shrimp in there) but they are clear or brown so VERY difficult to spot! I tested this tank last week and parameters were ideal for taiwan bee (PH6, TDS 140, KH 0-1, GH 5-6 (a bit high)) as it has been since set up. Tank 3 - male betta with wild cherry shrimp, again just done that tank and there are shrimp doing well in there but again, I can ony see them with a strong light and magnifying glass due to their lack of colour. I am looking at maybe just stocking up before winter so may get a job lot of bloody mary shrimp for tank 1 (and discard lots of wilds) and have a  final try with the taiwan bee as the tank 2 is at the moment. The parameters are perfect but the plants are still not nice and green with this substrate, as they were before with the other substrate but obviously shrimp are living in there, albeit not ones I wanted, so I can rule out disease and poisoning. As you say, the taiwan bee are much easier to see so may be preyed on by the fish so I won't buy expensive ones (ebay probably) or a large quantity (if I get any at all of course, though it is now or wait until next year). It would be the last lot I try until the fish die off and the tank is reset with the other substrate! Simon
    • Crabby
      So do you have any Taiwan bees going right now Simon? Or just the red cherries/wilds? I forget some of the stuff that you and jayc have.  Depending on the type you get, they could be targeted a lot more than your wilds are currently. Also I’m not too sure how the parameters would work, for neocaridina and taiwan bees. But I’d be very interested to see what comes of it if you try.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I agree with  crabby, having fish in a tank tends to draw the eye away from the shrimp, and of course the shrimp won't be out and about quite so much! If you can resist the urge to get fish (for now at least) except a few ottocinclus (they don't move that much) that would be best and give your shrimp colony a better chance of growing quicker, but obviously the final decision will be yours! I have fish (tetra) in my oldest tank mainly as that tank is 5 or 6 feet from where I normally sit so wanted something I could see from a distance. I have rasbora and killie in the specialised shrimp tank because I was having difficulty with shrimp in that tank anyway and covid started so I quickly grabbed some fish before lockdown etc so there would be something in that tank - I am thinking I may try and get some taiwan bee shrimmp for that tank next week, before winter gets here, though whether it will work tankwise or with the fish???????????????   Simon
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