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erwan

Benefits of having a Bonzai Driftwood for your aquaspace

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erwan    3
erwan
dding an aquarium to your landscape must be the ultimate due to its unique nature and aesthetic value. Although it may seem a complicated art, aquascape has been in existence for several decades, and thus one can borrow some of the previously used ideas and add their personal touch. Some of the old ideas include adding rocks and wood in the aquarium.
 

New aquarium trend

In the recent past, it has become impossible to talk about designing a landscape without mentioning the use of aquarium driftwood. One of the reasons is because Bonzai offers landscapers the choice of many colors and sizes. Most importantly, Bonzai can be crafted so to suit unique needs but at the same time maintain its natural feel.
Similarly, Bonzai driftwood has a become a trendy design idea in aquascape for its ability to create a natural scene Noteworthy; aqua scaping involves a lot of science because of the aqua-life involved. On the other hand, it involves exhibition of beauty which should not be lost in the midst of preserving the aqua-life. It is, therefore, a tough balance of beauty and life because having an aqua-life is solely not about raising fish.
To landscapers in the aqua space world, bonsai driftwood is the ultimate accessory. This is because bonsai driftwood carries with it an extraordinary touch of beauty but at the same time provides the much-needed safety for the qualify.
 

Maintain lower PH level

Foremost, aquascape with bonsai works to soften the PH level in water which in turn lowers the PH level. Specifically, bonsai contain tannic acid that softens the water thereby lowering the PH level. The lowering of the water PH can be very beneficial more so for fish species that grow well in an acidic habitat as opposed to the natural PH.
Also, it has been shown that bonsai makes the aquarium look more natural by making the water look natural. In fact, the water resembles natural environments such as rivers.
Moreover, bonsai driftwood is now available as a handcrafted piece that binds the fragments of wood considered aquarium- safe together. The bonsai driftwood is crafted in many shapes and sizes and uniquely imitates a beautiful underwater tree for the aqua space.
More so, aquarium driftwood a proves an ideal piece in aqua space as it can be used to change the natural hue of water. Noteworthy, Only certain species work in this regard. Therefore where one wishes to have an aquarium with slightly differently colored water, they should ascertain that they use the correct species.
Another benefit is that bonsai driftwood is a source of food for the aquatic species. More so, bonsai driftwood is rich in nutrients for fish. Some of its nutrient content are ignin and cellulose.
In addition to acting as a safe hide away for fish, bonsai driftwood is beneficial as it provides an ideal habitat for the good bacteria. The good bacteria works to eliminate the harmful substances that may be contained in water such as nitrates and ammonia. Remember, the key to providing a comfortable aquatic life is providing an environment that is nearly similar to the natural habitat.
 

Bonzai act as a filtration system

Further, the bonsai leaves act as a filtration system for nitrates and thus aid in creating a balanced carbon cycle. Moreover, just like most aquatic plants, adding fish tank ornaments in the aquarium helps in the aeration of the water. Essentially, aerating the aquarium is saturating the water column with oxygen thus making the water an ideal space for the fish to thrive in. The wood, while undergoing photosynthesis will release oxygen and consume the carbon dioxide that fish respires.
Besides, Bonzai driftwood is a 100% natural and therefore does not contain any chemicals that may be said to cause harm to the fish. Though the wood releases carbon dioxide at night, this has been proven to have no detrimental effect on the fish.
Besides, having driftwood in your aqua space makes the fish more comfortable. This is because the fish will feel more protected as they have a place to hide when they feel danger around them. The twisted nature of bonsai driftwood the fact that and works well to give the fish a safe hiding space.
To add to this beauty, landscapers should consider layering the bonsai driftwood with rocks. Most importantly, if considering to buy bonsai driftwoods from aquatic shops. Also, ensure that there is enough space to place the driftwood because the wood tends to be large.

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NoGi    1,343
NoGi

Great write up @erwan, thanks for sharing

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exo-aquaristic    10
exo-aquaristic

Great write up! We'd also like to add it here:


BONZAI ACT AS A FILTRATION SYSTEM

Further, the bonsai leaves act as a filtration system for nitrates and thus aid in creating a balanced carbon cycle. Moreover, just like most aquatic plants, adding fish tank ornaments in the aquarium helps in the aeration of the water. Essentially, aerating the aquarium is saturating the water column with oxygen thus making the water an ideal space for the fish to thrive in. The wood, while undergoing photosynthesis will release oxygen and consume the carbon dioxide that fish respires.
Besides, Bonzai driftwood is a 100% natural and therefore does not contain any chemicals that may be said to cause harm to the fish. Though the wood releases carbon dioxide at night, this has been proven to have no detrimental effect on the fish.
Besides, having driftwood in your aqua space makes the fish more comfortable. This is because the fish will feel more protected as they have a place to hide when they feel danger around them. The twisted nature of bonsai driftwood the fact that and works well to give the fish a safe hiding space.
To add to this beauty, landscapers should consider layering the bonsai driftwood with rocks. Most importantly, if considering to buy bonsai driftwoods from aquatic shops. Also, ensure that there is enough space to place the driftwood because the wood tends to be large.
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    • erwan
      By erwan
      dding an aquarium to your landscape must be the ultimate due to its unique nature and aesthetic value. Although it may seem a complicated art, aquascape has been in existence for several decades, and thus one can borrow some of the previously used ideas and add their personal touch. Some of the old ideas include adding rocks and wood in the aquarium.   New aquarium trend
      In the recent past, it has become impossible to talk about designing a landscape without mentioning the use of aquarium driftwood. One of the reasons is because Bonzai offers landscapers the choice of many colors and sizes. Most importantly, Bonzai can be crafted so to suit unique needs but at the same time maintain its natural feel. Similarly, Bonzai driftwood has a become a trendy design idea in aquascape for its ability to create a natural scene Noteworthy; aqua scaping involves a lot of science because of the aqua-life involved. On the other hand, it involves exhibition of beauty which should not be lost in the midst of preserving the aqua-life. It is, therefore, a tough balance of beauty and life because having an aqua-life is solely not about raising fish. To landscapers in the aqua space world, bonsai driftwood is the ultimate accessory. This is because bonsai driftwood carries with it an extraordinary touch of beauty but at the same time provides the much-needed safety for the qualify.   Maintain lower PH level
      Foremost, aquascape with bonsai works to soften the PH level in water which in turn lowers the PH level. Specifically, bonsai contain tannic acid that softens the water thereby lowering the PH level. The lowering of the water PH can be very beneficial more so for fish species that grow well in an acidic habitat as opposed to the natural PH. Also, it has been shown that bonsai makes the aquarium look more natural by making the water look natural. In fact, the water resembles natural environments such as rivers. Moreover, bonsai driftwood is now available as a handcrafted piece that binds the fragments of wood considered aquarium- safe together. The bonsai driftwood is crafted in many shapes and sizes and uniquely imitates a beautiful underwater tree for the aqua space. More so, aquarium driftwood a proves an ideal piece in aqua space as it can be used to change the natural hue of water. Noteworthy, Only certain species work in this regard. Therefore where one wishes to have an aquarium with slightly differently colored water, they should ascertain that they use the correct species. Another benefit is that bonsai driftwood is a source of food for the aquatic species. More so, bonsai driftwood is rich in nutrients for fish. Some of its nutrient content are ignin and cellulose. In addition to acting as a safe hide away for fish, bonsai driftwood is beneficial as it provides an ideal habitat for the good bacteria. The good bacteria works to eliminate the harmful substances that may be contained in water such as nitrates and ammonia. Remember, the key to providing a comfortable aquatic life is providing an environment that is nearly similar to the natural habitat.   Bonzai act as a filtration system
      Further, the bonsai leaves act as a filtration system for nitrates and thus aid in creating a balanced carbon cycle. Moreover, just like most aquatic plants, adding fish tank ornaments in the aquarium helps in the aeration of the water. Essentially, aerating the aquarium is saturating the water column with oxygen thus making the water an ideal space for the fish to thrive in. The wood, while undergoing photosynthesis will release oxygen and consume the carbon dioxide that fish respires. Besides, Bonzai driftwood is a 100% natural and therefore does not contain any chemicals that may be said to cause harm to the fish. Though the wood releases carbon dioxide at night, this has been proven to have no detrimental effect on the fish. Besides, having driftwood in your aqua space makes the fish more comfortable. This is because the fish will feel more protected as they have a place to hide when they feel danger around them. The twisted nature of bonsai driftwood the fact that and works well to give the fish a safe hiding space. To add to this beauty, landscapers should consider layering the bonsai driftwood with rocks. Most importantly, if considering to buy bonsai driftwoods from aquatic shops. Also, ensure that there is enough space to place the driftwood because the wood tends to be large.
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