Jump to content

How to tell Caridina apart from Neocaridina


fishmosy
 Share

Recommended Posts

This article was written by Werner Klotz, the scientist who authored the recent description of CRS and tigers from Southern China. I have written permission from the author to translate and reproduce the article here. I thank the author for permission to post this information here. I apologise in advance if my translation differs substantially from the original.

 

The original article can be found (in german) here: http://www.wirbellose.de/klotz/neocaridina.html
 
Caridina or Neocaridina?

© Werner Klotz

 

 

Many of our dwarf shrimp do not have a scientific name and are instead referred to as Caridina sp. or Neocaridina sp.. In aquarists literature - (I believe the author is referring to online forums, magazines, ect., but not scientific literature), one occasionally finds the idea that species with large eggs and direct-developing larvae (larvae that essentially hatch as mini adults) belong to the genus Neocaridina, whilst species that have planktonic larvae and small larvae belong to the genus Caridina. This is incorrect. The type of larval development has nothing to do with which shrimp belong in which genus.

 

In 1938, the genus Neocaridina was divided from the genus Caridina by Japanese scientists (1). The separation of the two genera was based on the inner branch (Endopod, En) of the first swimming leg pair of male animals.

 

In species of the genus Neocaridina, this has a pear-shaped, distally broadened shape. The internal appendix (ai), a small appendage on the inside of the endopod, is found (if present) always in the basal region (bottom) of the endopods (Figure 1).   
 
Figure 1
PL1m.jpg
 

 

In the species of the genus Caridina, the endopod has an elongated, sheet-like, distal, narrow shape. An internal appendix is found (if present) near the distal end (the end furthest away) of the endopods (Figure 2).

Figure 2
PL11m.jpg
 
 
 
Another thing which differentiates Neocaridina and Caridina can be found in females as well. On the first maxilliped (the legs around the mouth that assist in feeding), many (but not all) species of the genus Caridina have an exopodite (a finger like spur). This is absent for species in the genus Neocaridina (Figure 3 & 4 - arrow). 
Mx1C.jpgMx1N.jpg
 
 

It should be noted that the separation of the genus Neocaridina has been opposed by some taxonomists. In their opinion, the term Neocaridina is just a synonym for Caridina (2).

 

The genus Neocaridina was recently reviewed by Cai (3) who confirmed the genus as being separate to Caridina.

 

Literature cited:

 

1) I.Kubo, J. Imp. Fish. Inst. Tokyo 33:67-100,1938 On the Japanese atyid shrimps
2) MS Hung, J. of Crustacean Biology, 13(3): 481-503, 1993 Aytyd shrimps (Decapoda: Caridea) of Taiwan, with descripitons of three new species
3) Cai, Y, Acta Zootaxon. Sinica 21: 129-60, 1996 A revision of the genus Neocaridina (Crustacea: Decapoda:Atyidae) 
 
 

Text and photos © Werner Klotz 2003
 



 

Edited by fishmosy
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Hey folks!
      This thread is intended as a documentation (and space to ask questions of course) of @Frosty and my venture into caridina shrimp. 
      We’re starting off this weekend with 15-20 mischling shrimp (tibee x CBS), and maybe in a couple months if everything is going well we can add some TTS or KK or pandas or something. 
      The tank is a 4ft, with inert gravel and rocks, lots of moss, Java fern (crested and regular) and assorted crypts, and a couple big pieces of driftwood. 
      Current parameters are the following (please advise us if you think we should fix anything):
      22°, 6.8 pH (we might try ageing our water change water with peat moss, so with a couple water changes we’ll bring this down to 6.4-6.6), 3GH, 2KH, and 0 nitrates, nitrites and ammonia. 

      We’re thinking maybe to make it more interesting to the average onlooker, we might add a small school of chilli rasboras, but that’s hopefully going to be it for fish. 
      The tank is in direct sunlight, so there’s a possibility we’ll need ottos at some stage.

      I’ll update later with photos and our plans. Please let me know if you’ve got any advice!
      Cheers!
       
    • Patrick Gagnon
      By Patrick Gagnon
      I recently put in an order for 12 blue dream and 12 cherry shrimp. The shipping was delayed, Harrisburg PA distribution is terrible. Took over 9 days for them to arrive. 0 DOA. Nice! Anyway I've had them now for I'd say 2 weeks. One already is pregnant! And I recently found a guest staying. I have copepods all over, I heard they are fine. I'm not sure what this is. Looks to have antennas, like a snail or something.

    • SonoranStorm
      By SonoranStorm
      Hi all.
      So some background
      My 10g tank has:
      Blue Dreams
      Amanos
      1 Cardinia that stowed away in a plant shipment I got
      3 Rainbow Paskais
      1 Celestial Danio
      Phoenix Moss
      Crinum Calamistratum (Onion Plant)
      Nymphaea Zenkeri (Tiger Lotus)
      Bolbitis Heudelotii (Creeping Fern)
      Eleocharis sp. Mini (Mini Dwarf Hairgrass )
      Micranthemum (Monte Carlo)
      A random piece of Subwasstertang
      algea but i dont want that
      The overall goal of this tank is to be a shrimp tank with the neos and maybe a species of Caridina once I'm a little more experienced. But I have a hard time keeping the neos alive a friend who owns the LFS ive been buying them at recommended i try buying from a local shrimper because his shrimp might be more well suited to the local water than the shrimp he buys from abroad because he thinks its weird that im having a tough time with Neos. So I did just that when i met up with him he told me co2 might be the issue since it makes the water acidic and makes molting hard and it makes the water parameters more unstable so I stopped using Co2 for the time being and the shrimp look healthy. But the issue is I would like to keep using Co2 for the benefits to the plants and because id like to keep the carpet ive been working on.
      Current Parameters
      Temp: 74.5 F/ 23.6 C
      Ph: Between 6 and 6.4 (im bad at colors) but its yellow (API Test)
      Kh: 4 drops the chat says 4 degrees 71 PPM
      Gh: 6 drops the chart says 6 degrees 107 PPM
      TDS: Waiting on a meter from amazon.
      Lights are on between 4 PM and 9:30 PM for those who don't do the military time. Bellow are the spectral percentages of light if this helps anyone.
      Any advice on how and if I should add Co2?

    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Exciting news: I just purchased 15 tangerine tiger shrimp from a local breeder, in exchange for some of my abundance of endler fry. I’m starting the drip acclimation now, along with my other two tts males who I’m moving from my larger tank. I’ll add some photos down below once they’re in the tank. Will acclimate another hour and a half probably, and feed the fish a bit extra before they go in for safety. There’s heaps of good hiding places in this tank, and I can’t wait to see the shrimp utilising them (or hopefully not even see them)!
      Will update soon.
      Cheers,
      Crabby
    • stlcopperhead
      By stlcopperhead
      Hi all, 
      I’m confused about the ID on this parasite/infection my neo has. She has nothing on her head/rostrum at all...it seems to be mostly around her eggs, with some on her shell, off to the side.
      I’ve done one salt dip on her already, and no change so far. 
       
      I have some great pics of it, but even a single pic is apparently much to be posted here. Can someone help me out with that? Newbie, here. 😏
       
  • Join Our Community!

    Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

  • Must Read SKF Articles

  • Posts

    • sdlTBfanUK
      There isn't much to report on this at the moment, I am 50/50 as to whether this is going to work or not long term. I have seen 2 dead shrimp since adding the new ones and counted about half of the new shrimp bought, that I saw yesterday! This is going to be a long term experiment I guess, the best I hope will happen at this point is that the remaining shrimp survive and reproduce and that new borns born in the tank should be more suited to the environment/water etc. There is an element of the acclimating didn't go as well/to plan as it should with my knowledge/experience, but I did the best I could, so that is what it is! Simon
    • Franks
      How is now the condition of pH?
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Summary from the old thread; I managed to destroy my wonderful Taiwan bee tank with a faulty heater that cooked them. I then set up the tank afresh May 2019 using shrimpking substrate, new plants and wood etc. The tank looked very drab from the start and several batches of new taiwan bee were added and died out instantly. Covid came along so I decided I would give up with the taiwan bee shrimp and get some fish instead about a year later (1 kilie and 12 mosquito rasbora). September 2020 I tried another batch of tawian bee but they fared no better and the tank was still very drab looking (and still is to this very day). I very much doubt it is the substrate but won't be using that again but have aquired a large bag of the old type of substrate I used before, but I really don't know what caused the problem, maybe there was some sort of bacterial infection or I accidently poisoned the shrimp, or there was something on the new plants/wood??? The parameters were always perfect and I have to just accept I will never know? At some later date I dumped some wild type red cherry culls into the tank as food for the killie but he didn't seem to eat them (they were clear/brown so maybe he didn't see them) and they seemed to settle into the tank and bred! Fast forward to a month ago and I decided that now the postal service is better than it had been early in the pandemic, I should maybe try some more taiwan bee as the cherry shrimp had been in there for a year or so and doing well, so I assume whatever the problem was had gone, although the tank is still not as healthy looking as the other tanks using the other substrate! I ordered 15 black shrimps 2 weeks ago and put those in the tank and they seemed to be surviving so earlier this week I order 20 red/blue shrimp and put those in the ttank yesterday. This morning I counted 18 shrimps (about half) so it looks as though it maybe going to work now, the tank is so densely planted that I would never expect to see ALL the live shrimp anyway! The killie fish died a few days ago so he isn't a threat anymore and I doubt the rasboras are either. I am now in the process of fishing out the wild type cherry shrimp as/when I see them! Here is the link to the full thread about the above but I decided to start a fresh thread from here on, https://skfaquatics.com/forum/forums/topic/14523-here-we-go-again/ I will keep this thread updated and get some photos at some stage, though the new shrimp are a bit small at the moment.  Simon
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I think I should start a new thread on this now as this is getting a bit long and it seems to be working now, and to keep it tidier and easy to find/follow! I will attach a link below once done! Simon https://skfaquatics.com/forum/forums/topic/15621-here-we-go-again-again/  
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Hopefully it will settle quite quickly now and it was just everything sorting itself out, and at least you caught it before it caused problems with the fish and shrimps. As you also say, it will take a bit of time for the neneficial bacteria to spread in the new sunstrate as well! The  packaging of the substrate should tell you if there is any routine you should carry out when first using it because of mineral build-up or ammonia, so if the packaging didn't say anything I think it is safe to assume it was not the substrate (Fluval stratum is volcanic soil), and other people may have just assumed it was the substrate without considering anything else if they had a similar episode to yours? Simon 
×
×
  • Create New...