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revolutionhope

nitrfying bacteria pH shock

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revolutionhope

hey skf,

I know that nitrifying bacteria begin to die off at lower pH levels but I wonder whether nitrfying bacteria can suffer from pH shock/stress.

For example if I have a live filter in a tank with pH 7,5 or 8 or more even and I then place the-filter in a tank with pH 6 (or if I did this the other way around say) would this cause significant die-off of the nitrifying bacteria?

 

love n peace

will

 

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fishmosy

There will be a substantial dieback in numbers of bacteria given a  pH swing of this magnitude (remembering pH is on a log scale so change in pH from 8 to 6 is a 100 times increase in the number of hydrogen ions present).

However the good news is that the numbers of bacteria should quickly recover. Some water testing during the first week or two of from the changeover is advised.

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revolutionhope

tq dr mosy i hoping that would be the case!

It's good to know that the population won't be completely wiped out otherwise i would be in for some trouble in the coming days :-)

love n peace

will

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FMuscle

I was suspecting dr mosy would have the answer :P 
I was guessing what he said when I read the question, but I didn't know enough to shime in. Thanks @fishmosy always good infos

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