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puddlejumper388

How do I correct water parameters please.

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puddlejumper388

Hi everyone, I have spent some time searching (unsuccessfully!) for any threads set up to address how to naturally and chemically treat the more important water parameters. Obviously I'm not talking about temp, but the PH, TDS, KH and GH levels are the ones I'm most interested in. Now I'm country based so the only water I've got access to is R/W and bore (perfectly drinkable from the pump itself, no brackishness) which I have used for 4 of my 6 tanks (tropical and a few lower grade cherries). But I want to better hone in the water condition as best I can so any tricks to raise lower the above parameters naturally or if need be chemically. Or if anyone knows/finds a link, anything will be appreciated.

Had put this in the pinned "Shrimps 101" but will try to delete it as it's probably better as a separate post.

Being rural makes water choice difficult and some of the values I've tested are way out, hence why I'm seeking advice.

Cheers all.

 

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OzShrimp

Mate to combat your TDS your gonna need to buy a reverse osmosis system. I just moved from the country where it was bore and river water to.

 

Once u run the RO system you remineralise your water with products such as Salty shrimp to the TDS you desire. 

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jayc

Rainwater with Salty Shrimp GH+ should work just as well.

Your bore water might be the one pushing the water parameters off.

Can you test pH, KH/GH and TDS of both your bore and rain water? That should confirm my suspicions.

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zn30

Our tap water is hard and becomes harder when adding conditioners so we use rain water no need to treat. I purchased a rain water tank just for the shrimp and fish I breed. Lucky for us after cycling the shrimp tanks for four to five weeks the parameters were all in range and maintained to date, we use amozonia substrate this may be the buffer?

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