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Found 8 results

  1. sdlTBfanUK

    Here we go again!

    I have now pretty much set up the shrimp tank afresh. The layout isn't 100% yet as I am testing a piece of rock for the week which I will test if it has any affect on Ph at the weekend when it has been in its tub of water for a wee? I set the heater going yesterday and as per JayC have turned it up for the cycle, and the 2 filters are running with sponges from other tanks. Most of the plants/wood are from before in the same tank. I put a small amount of Bacter AE and fish food into the tank as well today. Parameters today, TDS 213, ammonia 1, nitrite 0, nitrate 25 (these are the only tests I have done as it is just day 1 of running. As I am using RO water remineralised I don't expect I will test GH, KH, Ph at this early point but I can adjust those easy enough later down the line once cycled should they be out of sync, though they shouldn't (in theory), and adjusting the TDS is easy. I am planning to rinse the betta fish sponges in 4L of used betta water and dumping that in the shrimp tank on friday, tanks are next to each other so that will be soooo easy! That actually shouldn't affect the parameters much anyway? I will then run it as a set up tank and do 2L water change/maintenance each thursday (back to my old shedule) - tank will have about 26L of water in it (more substrate this time so 2 litres less water). If I am doing anything wrong or have missed/forgotten something I will be pleased to hear from anyone? Oh! and I will be getting at least a fixed thermometer this time, and will look into the device that JayC and KMS have recommended at some later stage when it is all up and running, though I did take a quick look and haven't seen any in the UK yet. I plan to get a strip thermometer that you stick on and it changes colour to show what the temperature is, as these are inoffensive to look at and I should be able to view them easily/often from where I normally sit and they can be stuck on the side instead of the front (which I see from my normal seat). I don't know how good/accurate they are though but it is only to indicate a problem so I don't have to go through this devastation, mine and the shrimps, again? https://www.pro-shrimp.co.uk/aquarium-thermometers/1072-jbl-digital-aquarium-thermometer-4014162614063.html?search_query=thermometer&results=44 Simon Day 2, ammonia 0, nitrite 0, nitrate 25 Day 3, ammonia 0, nitrite 0, nitrate 50 tds 221
  2. Hey guyz, im cycling a 30l tank to get some rcs in it. The tank is almost cycled and im thinking of getting them next week. I have tested the water and the kH is at 9 and ph is 7 (i have yet to buy a gh test as i bought the jbl pack and didnt realise it does not include gh). I have read about parameter for neo carodina and they say that the hardier the water the better. But i have also read that the water can be too hard which will make it hard for them to molt. What would you recommend for the parameters ? And how much should i start as a basic colony?
  3. SquaniceandSquilliam

    Need feedback on nano tank setup

    Hi I'm an animal enthusiast with many frogs snakes and arachnids but it's my first attempt at caring for cherry shrimp..i researched with my girlfriend quite a bit and already set up a planted tank in a nano 2.6gallon aquarium. It will be cycling and until then I just wanted some feedback on how it looks and what y'all think about it? Thankyou ~
  4. Hey everyone how's things? So I was on and off with shrimp the last 6 months or so while I was doing other things and getting into nano softwater fish, building tanks and saving money, now I've got a bit more free time again I just bought a ton of new tanks, equipment and shrimp in the last few months, it's all coming together now. This is what my lounge room/fish room looks like ATM lol
  5. If you are setting up a new aquarium, here is a short primer on how to set up your aquarium properly and efficiently. It may seem daunting at first, but assembling your new aquarium is easier than you think. Get all the aquarium materials ready First get all the aquarium materials ready by washing them thoroughly with warm water. Don’t use commercial soaps and detergents as they are toxic to fish. Stick to the most common and the simplest aquarium ornaments. Sift the gravel over a bucket and drain, repeating the process until you are sure that the gravel is debris-free. Fill your tank with water and set up equipment The next step in the process is to fill your tank with water. Initially fill around 30% of the tank using room temperature water. You can add the rest of the water right after the internals such as airline tubing, live or plastic plants and other ornaments are added. The air tube is an essential part of the aquarium as it helps with the oxygenation of the water. Plants are generally added to hide equipment, help with the aqua scape or simply aid in the tanks biological ecosystem. The air pump, power filter, and heater are other types of equipment that should be added. De-chlorinate You need to treat the water in the aquarium to remove chlorine, which is harmful to your biological filter and could be lethal to your fish. It is important not to overdose on de-chlorinators, as they can have an impact on water chemistry. Cycle your aquarium When an aquarium is cycled, it means that you cultivate or grow a bacteria bed in your tank, specifically in the biological filters. The filters will grow bacteria that digest ammonia which converts to nitrite, which is naturally produced and lethal to fish, shrimp, and coral. Controlling these lethal elements is done by introducing healthy nitrifying bacteria into the aquarium. Before you add fish or shrimp, an aquarium must be cycled properly. This is called the fishless cycle. If you place all your fish or shrimp inside the aquarium without the cycling process, chances are they will probably die within a few days. Cycling your aquarium takes time and it’s important not to rush it. In some cases, it has taken 6 – 8 weeks to properly cycle a tank. Adding the inhabitants Before adding your livestock, it is imperative to test the water. Specifically, the levels of ammonia and nitrite. You need to make sure that these two toxic nitrogen compounds are non-existent in the tank. Wait for two months before cleaning your new filter to allow significant growth of good nitrifying bacteria to populate. Acclimatise the livestock Acclimatising your livestock is a very important procedure because it helps your newly-acquired fish or shrimp adjust to their new habitat. Even a minor relocation can affect them because of changes in water parameters. Setting up a new aquarium takes a lot of planning and patience. Just follow the basic guidelines and the recommendations in this primer, and you will find that owning an aquarium is fulfilling and enjoyable.
  6. If you are setting up a new aquarium, here is a short primer on how to set up your aquarium properly and efficiently. It may seem daunting at first, but assembling your new aquarium is easier than you think. Get all the aquarium materials ready First get all the aquarium materials ready by washing them thoroughly with warm water. Don’t use commercial soaps and detergents as they are toxic to fish. Stick to the most common and the simplest aquarium ornaments. Sift the gravel over a bucket and drain, repeating the process until you are sure that the gravel is debris-free. Fill your tank with water and set up equipment The next step in the process is to fill your tank with water. Initially fill around 30% of the tank using room temperature water. You can add the rest of the water right after the internals such as airline tubing, live or plastic plants and other ornaments are added. The air tube is an essential part of the aquarium as it helps with the oxygenation of the water. Plants are generally added to hide equipment, help with the aqua scape or simply aid in the tanks biological ecosystem. The air pump, power filter, and heater are other types of equipment that should be added. De-chlorinate You need to treat the water in the aquarium to remove chlorine, which is harmful to your biological filter and could be lethal to your fish. It is important not to overdose on de-chlorinators, as they can have an impact on water chemistry. Cycle your aquarium When an aquarium is cycled, it means that you cultivate or grow a bacteria bed in your tank, specifically in the biological filters. The filters will grow bacteria that digest ammonia which converts to nitrite, which is naturally produced and lethal to fish, shrimp, and coral. Controlling these lethal elements is done by introducing healthy nitrifying bacteria into the aquarium. Before you add fish or shrimp, an aquarium must be cycled properly. This is called the fishless cycle. If you place all your fish or shrimp inside the aquarium without the cycling process, chances are they will probably die within a few days. Cycling your aquarium takes time and it’s important not to rush it. In some cases, it has taken 6 – 8 weeks to properly cycle a tank. Adding the inhabitants Before adding your livestock, it is imperative to test the water. Specifically, the levels of ammonia and nitrite. You need to make sure that these two toxic nitrogen compounds are non-existent in the tank. Wait for two months before cleaning your new filter to allow significant growth of good nitrifying bacteria to populate. Acclimatise the livestock Acclimatising your livestock is a very important procedure because it helps your newly-acquired fish or shrimp adjust to their new habitat. Even a minor relocation can affect them because of changes in water parameters. Setting up a new aquarium takes a lot of planning and patience. Just follow the basic guidelines and the recommendations in this primer, and you will find that owning an aquarium is fulfilling and enjoyable. View full article
  7. LC Bee

    Crs tank setup

    Hey everyone i want to setup a crystal red tank but im not quite sure were to start. I was just wondering if anybody would be very helpful and share with me there techniques and what products they use, because ive been trying to make a plan for quite a while now and a few problems have come up. I'm going to use ADA amazonia as substrate, Up aqua pro Led light Z series, Two sponges, a chiller, lots of Java moss and drift wood and i've already got Mosura Tonic pro, Mosura Bioplus, Mosura Excel and Hikari shrimp cuisine. What I'm really looking for is what to use under the substrate i was planning on using Mosura old sea mud and BT-9 but i was unable to get them, so id like to know of the alternatives. Em also using my tank water and it has a TDS of 60 so i would probably need to know how to increase that, or if some of my products would already do that or if i even need to use some of my products. I think im over thinking and confusing my self so Any information would be really appreciated, Thank you.
  8. jayc

    Creating your own DIY background

    Creating your own DIY background. It's a combination of LED lights, and painted cardboard. Start with cardboard sheets, I purchased it from art supply shops or they can also be found in most $2 shops in the art supply section. You can choose white cardboard, but I chose sky blue, to simulate the sky. The cardboard, is trimmed to the sized of the tank. Join several pieces together if needed. It's then as simple as painting, or rather blotting white paint onto the blue cardboard. I used white watercolour blotted onto the cardboard for the cloud effect. I find watercolour gave the best cloud like effects. You'll notice it's not perfect, and it doesn't have to be perfect. That's the beauty of it. The next is the lighting. It's just a simple LED strip of light placed at the back of the tank. It's your preference in the type of LEDs you get, and how many strips you use. I used 5050 LEDs, and double strips for that extra brightness. Now, it's just a matter of placing your cardboard at the back of the tank like so... Notice, the LED lights are in between the board and tank. Here's what it looks like with different coloured effects. Please excuse my DIY surface skimmer in these next shots. Yes, it ruins the look, but be assured, it's only temporary while the tank is cycling. After a bush fire... Tropical waters ... A simple white sheet of cardboard is also very effective. Here is an example of a plain white background with the LED lights, on a small section of the tank. I need to show you a better pic of the full tank with a white background and lights. If you find the cardboard too thin and does not sit up straight, you can always glue it to a thick piece of board. Hope you enjoyed it! Told you it was simple. But then again the simple things are always the best.
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