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Bluevelvets

What is this fuzz?!

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Bluevelvets

I have a large colony of blue velvets that I’ve just noticed a few individuals (4, all mature females, 3 are berried) that have a white fuzzy material on the sides of their heads and tail regions. I’m suspecting this is a fungus, but I need to know how to treat. Can I treat the whole colony safely? I have hundreds of babies and others of all stages. Their tankmates are mystery snails and a baby bristlenose pleco. 

Right now I’ve isolated the 4 females into a separate container that hangs inside the main tank (to keep temperatures stable) and I’m doing daily water changes in the container. 

 

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jayc

Have you got a picture ?

Alternatively, have a look at this post to see if you can identify it.

Treatments are listed as well in that post.

It is either fungus or it could be Vorticella or Scutariella.

Edited by jayc

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Bluevelvets

I do have pics, but I couldn’t upload them because the file is too big and I can’t seem to make them smaller. It does resemble the white fuzz on the fungal infection picture in that article, but not as thick and obvious. I’ll keep working on trying to upload the pics...

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Bluevelvets

Ok, so according to the article, I believe it is vorticella. I followed exact directions for a 30 second salt bath on 6-8 affected shrimp. Next morning, all of them were dead. I used the 1tsp/cup of water, 30 second bath, transfer back to clean tank water. I used API aquarium salt. Not sure what went wrong...

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jayc
2 hours ago, Bluevelvets said:

all of them were dead

Sorry to hear that.

Just double checking you used a teaspoon and not a tablespoon measurement.

Did you use tap or tank water?

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Bluevelvets

Yes, absolutely certain it was a teaspoon, not a tablespoon 

I used tank water

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Zoidburg

That's a shame... I was leaning towards vorticella myself without seeing pictuers.

 

I've used the same treatment for scutariella without deaths... but it is still stressful on the shrimp.

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Bluevelvets

I read someplace that Prazipro works. I’ll try that with a few before I dose the whole tank. 

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Zoidburg

Anything that kills planaria would also kill them, but I'd caution using Fenbendazole and many products out there it's better to under-dose anyway.

I've heard Paraguard works as well, but haven'tr tried it. I've been meaning to get Prazipro for a long time though! 

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jayc

Were the shrimp heavily infected? 

If they were heavily infected, it might have been too late even with the salt bath treatment. Vorticella can kill shrimp if they are too infected. Salt baths are stressful for the shrimp. But if you did nothing, the shrimp would have died anyway. So you did the right thing by taking the step to treat them.

If you use chemicals like Prazi or  Fenbendazole, definitely half dose, and follow up with a 50% water change 2 days later. Don't forget to remove any carbon before treating the tank.

Try to get us a close up picture if you can, so we are sure we are treating for the for ailment.

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Bluevelvets

Finally got a pic small enough to upload...closest I could get with my phone. I’ve never seen this before, so as far as heavy vs lightly infected, I’m not sure. Some had more than others. I just find it odd they all died at the same time. I have 3 more in the box for isolation now. Not doing the salt thing again. 

F17F470A-579D-43EC-AB52-3C8AFE0E7B9E.jpeg

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Bluevelvets

Got better pics. Can anyone confirm what this is so I know I’m treating appropriately?

ABA5E23A-386C-40F9-92BC-62CD987811A2.jpeg

EDC9CEEB-AAC8-42BC-89DC-6B1D3BF69A51.jpeg

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jayc
32 minutes ago, Bluevelvets said:

Got better pics

Oh yeah, that's vorticella without doubt. And that shrimp is heavily infected.

 

5 hours ago, Bluevelvets said:

Not doing the salt thing again

I know you are not doing the salt bath again. But I just wanted to get more info to make sure that we are giving people the right advise in the Diseases thread.

Did you use a level teaspoon measurement? or a heaped teaspoon measurement?

I have done salt baths on my shrimps before and they have not died. So I'm wondering if I need to adjust to a lower dosage for safety.

It's a continual learning process. It's not like there are many other posts on shrimp diseases around. Hope you understand if I keep probing 🙂

Edited by jayc

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Bluevelvets

I did use 1 level teaspoon of salt in 1 cup (8oz) of tank water. Salt was completely dissolved before shrimp were added. 1 minute dip and then back into clean tank water. I did this right before I went to bed, so was unable to observe them for long, but they were all active. Next morning all were dead. There were several molts present, some of which still had eggs attached. Sadly, many of the ones that died were berried females 

The shrimp in the most recent pics is much more heavily infected than the others were. There are 2 others in with this one, but they have since molted and don’t appear to have it anymore. I didn’t take them out because I doubt molting gets rid of it entirely 

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