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BlueBolts

Red Rilli Different Egg Colours

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BlueBolts

Just wondering the scientific reason of the two diff egg colours often seen in red rilli's. Due to their clear mid-body, they're easily visible in comparison to other shrimps, which would perhaps have varying shades/cplours etc too... is it to do with egg or shrimp maturity ? Both from same tank...

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Kitz

I have the same thing happen to me with Rilli, I don't think it's the maturity as both of my Rilli berried for the first time.The only different between my is that the Rilli with yellow eggs had been berried for 2 weeks more than the green eggs. I would love to know why too.

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2OFUS

post-1433-13990984877_thumb.jpg

One of our rilis

post-277-139909848169_thumb.jpg

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2OFUS

post-1433-139909848776_thumb.jpg

Another pic......... :)

post-277-139909848173_thumb.jpg

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Kitz

Here's my, left yellow eggs and right green eggs

post-163-139909848178_thumb.jpg

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fishmosy

I have a couple of theories to suggest why this may occur.

1. Development of the eggs. Eggs will change colour depending on the development of the embryo inside. (See Kitz post above, two weeks difference in maturity).

This is easily seen in fish eggs where larvae inside the egg will darken over time.

2. Maternal provisioning. This refers to what the mother shrimp puts in to the eggs. For example, the amount of lipids (fats) put in eggs will depend on many factors, including how many eggs the female produces (more eggs means less lipid per egg), the health of the mother (sick/stressed mother will keep more lipids for herself), the mothers diet (how much lipid she can gather from the environment), genetic variability (some mothers are better at getting, storing and provisioning lipids) and many other factors.

Now if we assume that egg colour is due to some colour producing chemical (e.g. Carotenoids) then the same rules apply. Some mothers can give their eggs more, some less. More chemical equals more colour, less chemical equals less colour.

3. Genetic variation. It could be that individuals could produce different coloured eggs due to differences in their genetics. For example, some chickens produce green eggs, others blue and some white. Interestingly this is also affected by the mother chickens diet, so you can get some normally white egg laying chickens to produce blue eggs by adding certain chemicals to their diet (essentially a combination of theory 2 and 3).

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BlueBolts

Great fishmosy...that's truly a great explanation... Thanks

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2OFUS
I have a couple of theories to suggest why this may occur.

1. Development of the eggs. Eggs will change colour depending on the development of the embryo inside. (See Kitz post above' date=' two weeks difference in maturity).

This is easily seen in fish eggs where larvae inside the egg will darken over time.

2. Maternal provisioning. This refers to what the mother shrimp puts in to the eggs. For example, the amount of lipids (fats) put in eggs will depend on many factors, including how many eggs the female produces (more eggs means less lipid per egg), the health of the mother (sick/stressed mother will keep more lipids for herself), the mothers diet (how much lipid she can gather from the environment), genetic variability (some mothers are better at getting, storing and provisioning lipids) and many other factors.

Now if we assume that egg colour is due to some colour producing chemical (e.g. Carotenoids) then the same rules apply. Some mothers can give their eggs more, some less. More chemical equals more colour, less chemical equals less colour.

3. Genetic variation. It could be that individuals could produce different coloured eggs due to differences in their genetics. For example, some chickens produce green eggs, others blue and some white. Interestingly this is also affected by the mother chickens diet, so you can get some normally white egg laying chickens to produce blue eggs by adding certain chemicals to their diet (essentially a combination of theory 2 and 3).[/quote']

What he said lol :)

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CNgo2006
I have a couple of theories to suggest why this may occur.

1. Development of the eggs. Eggs will change colour depending on the development of the embryo inside. (See Kitz post above' date=' two weeks difference in maturity).

This is easily seen in fish eggs where larvae inside the egg will darken over time.

2. Maternal provisioning. This refers to what the mother shrimp puts in to the eggs. For example, the amount of lipids (fats) put in eggs will depend on many factors, including how many eggs the female produces (more eggs means less lipid per egg), the health of the mother (sick/stressed mother will keep more lipids for herself), the mothers diet (how much lipid she can gather from the environment), genetic variability (some mothers are better at getting, storing and provisioning lipids) and many other factors.

Now if we assume that egg colour is due to some colour producing chemical (e.g. Carotenoids) then the same rules apply. Some mothers can give their eggs more, some less. More chemical equals more colour, less chemical equals less colour.

3. Genetic variation. It could be that individuals could produce different coloured eggs due to differences in their genetics. For example, some chickens produce green eggs, others blue and some white. Interestingly this is also affected by the mother chickens diet, so you can get some normally white egg laying chickens to produce blue eggs by adding certain chemicals to their diet (essentially a combination of theory 2 and 3).[/quote']

You can tell fishmosy doesn't belong to no retard group (referring to the Don't be afraid to ask any type question thread) LOL!

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