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Amano/yamato shrimp


ShrimpNoob9
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Hi does anyone have experience with amano shrimps? Is the shrimp below pregnant? But the size of the eggs are not the same though. It's smaller, black and dirty looking. And my tank doesn't have brackish water. Should I do something? 0be2684031a2ac7e44bd0a93bc5f579e.jpg

 

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Took me a second to spot the Amano, that’s a great photo to showcase natural camouflage! 
Yep, she’s definitely berried, those are amano eggs. 
She’ll give birth, but the shrimplets won’t survive in fresh water. If you want you can transfer her to a tank with brackish water, keep it closer to fresh than salt, and the shrimplets will have a chance at survival. Don’t turn that main tank into brackish, the crystals and cherries can’t cope with salt for very long. 

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Nice clear photo of a berried shrimp!

They are very difficult to raise as they have a larvae stage and need specific food. I haven't ever met or heard of anyone who has siuccess with this so would recommend you just leave it where it is and the eggs will drop/hatch and die! We have had a couple of people on here in the passed who have triedso there are threads and information on here, but they didn't succeed!

The  flip side to this is they live longer than other shrimp, up to 5 years, and if they don't breed then you will  never get over stocked so they are easier to manage? You wouldn't want lots anyway with smaller shrimp as the Amano would be dominant and therefore detrimental to the crystals/neocaridina if you have too many?

Like crabby, I didn't see the shrimp at first glance, it's well camouflaged,

Simon

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If you attempt to raise the amano shrimplets, try feeding them spirulina powder or chlorella powder.

Get yourself a small bag of marine salt to turn freshwater into brackish. As Crabby said, closer to freshwater than complete marine water.

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Hi everyone sorry for the late reply. Thank you so much for your honest feedbacks. I've decided to listen to your advices and not attempting to keep the amano premetaphormosis shrimps. It's really no walk in the park. I saw a very detailed video in case anyone who comes by this post intends to try.



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That is a very good video and one that anyone thinkong of breeding Amano should watch! I like the using seawater, readily available to me  here and very much easier than making the salt water etc.

The thing I like about Amano though is the ability to easily regulate the number BECAUSE they don't breed in a normal freshwater tank, and they live quite a long time so restocking wouldn't become a frequent chore!

Simon

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