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Controlling Hair Algae in a Neo Tank


Neos in Woodstock
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I've got the beginnings of a hair algae bloom and want to nip it quick. I had previously cut down on adding "Easy Green" fertilizer to my tanks (to the detriment of many of my plants), and now I'm cutting back on the lighting. I'm questioning if using Seachem's Flourish Excel would help or could I hurt the RCS. Right now, with only a month under my belt, I have 3 females with eggs and have only lost two in the first week and would like to keep it that way.

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Flourish excel helps with BBA, not hair algae, so I think you should just leave it with low lighting and no ferts; that’s what I would do at least.

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Thanks

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I would just give it time and it will probably clear itself when the tank is more settled! Lots of people get algae or fungus early on but if all is well wth the tank it should clear on its own in a few weeks.

Simon

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Thanks!

Having tanks in 2021 is so different than when I had them in the 1970's! Back then you'd put the gravel on top of the UG filter; fill up the tank with tap water; place the HOB filter; put some rocks in; maybe some wood; a few plants, and then buy the fish. For the most part, everything went pretty smooth. Now, the guppies are so inbred that I've spent more on medicines than on the plants, fish, and shrimp!

And balancing the tank used to mean how you set it on a "home-built" stand. Now it's balancing the water quality so the inbred fancy guppies will be stress-free while maintaining it near perfect for the neocaridina's. And then I figure out that the other side of the equation is balancing fert and light!  Now please understand... I'm not complaining! I like a good challenge.

I'm just damn glad I'm retired!  

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