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Chiquarius

Grey fuzz growing on aged cholla wood

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Chiquarius

Greetings shrimpers,

I have noticed some grey-white fuzz growing on a section of the cholla wood I have in my tank. The cholla was well boiled and has been in there for almost a year. The parameters are pretty good, no perceivable nitrates or nitrites (according to my own read of API strips). I have a canister filter way too powerful for tank size, so it doesn’t get too funky. Though, I have recently gradually shifted from typical neocardinis parameters to a lower-end TDS/pH/KH to accommodate caridina shrimp.

I’ve currently got neos and Corys in there. I used to have CPOs that mysteriously started dying (so I relocated them) and snails.

Perhaps I should bring the snails back?

Any thoughts on this mildewy stuff? Harmless?

Thanks.

 

 

 

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jayc

Should be harmless. Just the usual fungus that grows on wood. 

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sdlTBfanUK

As JayC says, it is fairly common and harmless, just looks gross!

It will probably disappear with time or just remove the wood if you (like me) don't want to see it any more?

I've only had it with new tanks so I assume you altering the parameters has triggered it!

Simon

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