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Red cherry shrimp has possible rust disease + minor moulting issue, please help!


Incyray
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I have one blue shadow and a red cherry shrimp in a 1.5 gal with anubias, crypt and a ton of baby rams horn snails. My cherry shrimp is behaving perfectly normal and all of my parameters save for nitrate, which is a bit worrysome but not nightmarish, are ok. The only thing that seems to be wrong with my cherry shrimp is that part of their rostrum is crooked and there is some discoloration on their exoskeleton, mainly on the segments of the tail and carapace. Its kind of dark dark red, but im scared it might be rust/black spot/brown spot dissease. I have a macro shot of the discoloration if it helps.  They used to be a lot brighter red, which is why im worried. However , they ARE my oldest shrimp and it could easily be simple aging. 

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Sorry I cant help, but I did notice that when I enlarged the picture that as well as the obvious disclouration on the top of the carapace there is also a funny whitish almost mould/ fungus looking discolouration on the side of the shrimp.

All I could suggest is keep on top of your water and maybe add some almond leaves to the tank to help with its antibiotic properties.

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Alright, i'll see about getting some almond leaves!

yesterday a did a water change so that should help too. 

I dont think they have any fungus though because when i use the macro lens, anything not immediately in its region of fucus  is very blurry, and upon looking at my shrimp irl i think that just the background peeking out from between the gravel and shrimp. 

Thank you for the advice though! 

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