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NoGi

Benibachi Planaria Zero safe with Sulas?

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NoGi

Anyone here tried Benibachi Planaria Zero in their Sula tanks?

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jayc

Gotta wait for me to get a pair of Sula first. 

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NoGi

Just to update this, looks like using at half dosage was OK. Haven't seen anyone do full dosage yet.

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Blue Ridge

Not a Sulawasi keeper (yet) here either, but I have used the product on bees and cherries. Panacur C is also very effective and shrimp-safe if you have access to it, it's sold as a dog dewormer. 

Glad to hear your planaria have disappeared, they are such a pain! Keep an eye on the tank, though. Sometimes babies deep in the substrate can survive the first wave and start popping back up. 

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jayc

Unfortunately we can't get Panacur C in Australia.

But good suggestion for others outside Oz.

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Blue Ridge

That stinks. Such an impossible drug to abuse. I bet if not over the counter, it could be had for a dog with worms if willing to pay a vet RX for it. Not that I would ever dare do such a thing for my own exotic pets (end sarcasm font). If you know anyone with horses, you could also get the tiniest dab and have enough to treat hundreds of gallons. Just throwing it out there, you can get your hands on some if you burn the calories. When I sold animals in my store, I had to access lots of restricted things -mostly antibiotics here in the US. Was lucky enough to have good relationships with vets and livestock keepers who would understand my plight. It's difficult to get any real penicillin, erythromycin, and such anymore. I suppose because of people taking their "Fish-Mox" for a tooth infection and having more serious problems so I get the restrictions to a degree. But boy, did I have to skirt a lot of laws and regs when I had my shop. 

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