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NoGi

Benibachi Planaria Zero safe with Sulas?

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NoGi

Anyone here tried Benibachi Planaria Zero in their Sula tanks?

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jayc

Gotta wait for me to get a pair of Sula first. 

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NoGi

Just to update this, looks like using at half dosage was OK. Haven't seen anyone do full dosage yet.

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