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wayne6442

Redclaw Crayfish ( Cherax quadricurinatus)

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wayne6442

   Cherax quadricarinatus (Redclaw Grayfish)    Back in 1985, I started a semi commercial venture breeding Redclaw Crayfish for the commercial market. My set up consisted of four 5,000 litre above ground swimming pools, set side by side with an overflow water exchange feature, a swimming pool pump and a pool sand filter. Water pick up for filtering was regulated from each pool passed down a common pipe to the filter, and from there the water was returned to the ponds via a spray system from above. This ensured that the returning filtered water was well airated for the redclaws.     My initial stock consisted of about 400 wild caught Redclaws from Northern Queensland split roughly between the four pools. About three weeks before stocking I seeded each pool with about 10 kilos each of mud from a local dam and cow manure from a dairy farm,to set up the bio eco system that the cray's would need     This venture ran well for about three years, I was supplying my restaurant and others with live crayfish an a weekly basis.  AND THEN!!!  the government started to interfere by imposing strict live fish trading rules and introducing very expensive licensing fees. Unfortunately, The combination of both were enough to force me to close down my enterprise.  

 (Cherax Quadricarinatus)!  Redclaw Crayfish  also known as the Tropical Blue crayfish,and Australian Freshwater Crayfish.     Redclaw crayfish are a moderately large crayfish, and can reach lengths of over 90 mm and weigh in anywhere between 300 and 600 grams. They have a smooth body which is greenish/blueish in colour, the male of the species is distinguished by a bright red colouring on the margins of their large claws.     The Redclaw is native to the upper reaches of the rivers in north eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea. It's preferred habitat is in high turbidity,slow moving streams or static waterholes. Redclaw prefer sites with abundant aquatic vegetation that provides cover. Redclaw do not burrow into the riverbanks like other Cherax species but prefer to hide in natural depressions,under rocks or amongst vegetation.       Female Redclaw brood their eggs for six to ten weeks, depending on temperature. Most produce between 300 to 800 eggs per brood and they sometime breed five to six times per season. Water temperature is important  for breeding with the preferred range being 23 C to 31 C. Hatchling's resemble the adults and remain attached to the undersides of the female for several weeks before becoming independent                                                     5aacc7ed7eec5_redclaw3.jpg.97f19c627af3be7e7ff16f3ea7801bbf.jpg  male Redclaw
      Redclaw are NOT good aquarium tank mates, DO NOT KEEP THEM IN WITH OTHER FISH OR PLANTED TANKS. Although more placid than their other Charex cousins, they can get very agro when they have a mind to. My tip is to house them in a large aquarium 60 cm or larger with plenty of structure for hiding places so as they can get away from each other especially during times when they are moulting. The female also becomes very territorial when berried. FEEDING: They are omnivores but tend to eat more vegetable material, I have known them to munch into driftwood in their tank, they are not good fisherman being slower than  other Cherax species, but that does not exclude fresh fish from their diet. They do like chicken pellets, a very small piece of red meat , worms, and fish.

     I found that water temperature at around 25C to be good ( don't go up to 31C) good filtration with plenty of surface movement. PH between 6 and 7.5 although they can stand higher. Selective Breeding : I found the Redclaw to be relative easy contender for selective breeding ,having success in breeding a beautiful deep blue, pale blue, a deep green and an almost albino over successive generations. I also found that sometimes they will revert back to their original colours when severely stressed. I hope that this article will help some of you who are contemplating keeping Redcaw Crayfish.

 

5aacc7b681ac9_bluered.jpg.1ecd2fb7c2cd1d5c2e99f47d6f189e9f.jpgMale Blue                 5aacc809f0baa_redclaw6.jpg.bc8ca5026ace1efdf24a3622af356658.jpgFemale White

 

Disclaimer : The information contained in this article is purely from my own experiences and is by no means intended to be completely right in my findings Wayne Summerhayes

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wayne6442

Mods please note. i intended this publication to be posted in the article section but there was no sub heading to post it under. if you can can you please make a section and post please

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jayc

@Cesar will be able to help with a new subsection in the Articles area. Maybe change the "Crab" subsection to "Crabs and Crays".

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Cesar

@jayc great suggestion, article section has been updated to Crabs and Crayfish...

@wayne6442 please repost your article to the article section and I will delete this post to avoid duplicate content...

Thanks for the great suggestions and contributions!

-Cesar

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  • Similar Content

    • wayne6442
      By wayne6442
      Cherax quadricarinatus (Redclaw Grayfish)    Back in 1985, I started a semi commercial venture breeding Redclaw Crayfish for the commercial market. My set up consisted of four 5,000 litre above ground swimming pools, set side by side with an overflow water exchange feature, a swimming pool pump and a pool sand filter. Water pick up for filtering was regulated from each pool passed down a common pipe to the filter, and from there the water was returned to the ponds via a spray system from above. This ensured that the returning filtered water was well airated for the redclaws.     My initial stock consisted of about 400 wild caught Redclaws from Northern Queensland split roughly between the four pools. About three weeks before stocking I seeded each pool with about 10 kilos each of mud from a local dam and cow manure from a dairy farm,to set up the bio eco system that the cray's would need     This venture ran well for about three years, I was supplying my restaurant and others with live crayfish an a weekly basis.  AND THEN!!!  the government started to interfere by imposing strict live fish trading rules and introducing very expensive licensing fees. Unfortunately, The combination of both were enough to force me to close down my enterprise.  
       (Cherax Quadricarinatus)!  Redclaw Crayfish  also known as the Tropical Blue crayfish,and Australian Freshwater Crayfish.     Redclaw crayfish are a moderately large crayfish, and can reach lengths of over 90 mm and weigh in anywhere between 300 and 600 grams. They have a smooth body which is greenish/blueish in colour, the male of the species is distinguished by a bright red colouring on the margins of their large claws.     The Redclaw is native to the upper reaches of the rivers in north eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea. It's preferred habitat is in high turbidity,slow moving streams or static waterholes. Redclaw prefer sites with abundant aquatic vegetation that provides cover. Redclaw do not burrow into the riverbanks like other Cherax species but prefer to hide in natural depressions,under rocks or amongst vegetation.       Female Redclaw brood their eggs for six to ten weeks, depending on temperature. Most produce between 300 to 800 eggs per brood and they sometime breed five to six times per season. Water temperature is important  for breeding with the preferred range being 23 C to 31 C. Hatchling's resemble the adults and remain attached to the undersides of the female for several weeks before becoming independent                                                       male Redclaw
            Redclaw are NOT good aquarium tank mates, DO NOT KEEP THEM IN WITH OTHER FISH OR PLANTED TANKS. Although more placid than their other Charex cousins, they can get very agro when they have a mind to. My tip is to house them in a large aquarium 60 cm or larger with plenty of structure for hiding places so as they can get away from each other especially during times when they are moulting. The female also becomes very territorial when berried. FEEDING: They are omnivores but tend to eat more vegetable material, I have known them to munch into driftwood in their tank, they are not good fisherman being slower than  other Cherax species, but that does not exclude fresh fish from their diet. They do like chicken pellets, a very small piece of red meat , worms, and fish.
           I found that water temperature at around 25C to be good ( don't go up to 31C) good filtration with plenty of surface movement. PH between 6 and 7.5 although they can stand higher. Selective Breeding : I found the Redclaw to be relative easy contender for selective breeding ,having success in breeding a beautiful deep blue, pale blue, a deep green and an almost albino over successive generations. I also found that sometimes they will revert back to their original colours when severely stressed. I hope that this article will help some of you who are contemplating keeping Redcaw Crayfish.
       
      Male Blue                 Female White
       
      Disclaimer : The information contained in this article is purely from my own experiences and is by no means intended to be completely right in my findings Wayne Summerhayes
         
      View full article
    • wayne6442
      By wayne6442
      Cherax quadricarinatus (Redclaw Grayfish)    Back in 1985, I started a semi commercial venture breeding Redclaw Crayfish for the commercial market. My set up consisted of four 5,000 litre above ground swimming pools, set side by side with an overflow water exchange feature, a swimming pool pump and a pool sand filter. Water pick up for filtering was regulated from each pool passed down a common pipe to the filter, and from there the water was returned to the ponds via a spray system from above. This ensured that the returning filtered water was well airated for the redclaws.     My initial stock consisted of about 400 wild caught Redclaws from Northern Queensland split roughly between the four pools. About three weeks before stocking I seeded each pool with about 10 kilos each of mud from a local dam and cow manure from a dairy farm,to set up the bio eco system that the cray's would need     This venture ran well for about three years, I was supplying my restaurant and others with live crayfish an a weekly basis.  AND THEN!!!  the government started to interfere by imposing strict live fish trading rules and introducing very expensive licensing fees. Unfortunately, The combination of both were enough to force me to close down my enterprise.  
       (Cherax Quadricarinatus)!  Redclaw Crayfish  also known as the Tropical Blue crayfish,and Australian Freshwater Crayfish.     Redclaw crayfish are a moderately large crayfish, and can reach lengths of over 90 mm and weigh in anywhere between 300 and 600 grams. They have a smooth body which is greenish/blueish in colour, the male of the species is distinguished by a bright red colouring on the margins of their large claws.     The Redclaw is native to the upper reaches of the rivers in north eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea. It's preferred habitat is in high turbidity,slow moving streams or static waterholes. Redclaw prefer sites with abundant aquatic vegetation that provides cover. Redclaw do not burrow into the riverbanks like other Cherax species but prefer to hide in natural depressions,under rocks or amongst vegetation.       Female Redclaw brood their eggs for six to ten weeks, depending on temperature. Most produce between 300 to 800 eggs per brood and they sometime breed five to six times per season. Water temperature is important  for breeding with the preferred range being 23 C to 31 C. Hatchling's resemble the adults and remain attached to the undersides of the female for several weeks before becoming independent                                                       male Redclaw
            Redclaw are NOT good aquarium tank mates, DO NOT KEEP THEM IN WITH OTHER FISH OR PLANTED TANKS. Although more placid than their other Charex cousins, they can get very agro when they have a mind to. My tip is to house them in a large aquarium 60 cm or larger with plenty of structure for hiding places so as they can get away from each other especially during times when they are moulting. The female also becomes very territorial when berried. FEEDING: They are omnivores but tend to eat more vegetable material, I have known them to munch into driftwood in their tank, they are not good fisherman being slower than  other Cherax species, but that does not exclude fresh fish from their diet. They do like chicken pellets, a very small piece of red meat , worms, and fish.
           I found that water temperature at around 25C to be good ( don't go up to 31C) good filtration with plenty of surface movement. PH between 6 and 7.5 although they can stand higher. Selective Breeding : I found the Redclaw to be relative easy contender for selective breeding ,having success in breeding a beautiful deep blue, pale blue, a deep green and an almost albino over successive generations. I also found that sometimes they will revert back to their original colours when severely stressed. I hope that this article will help some of you who are contemplating keeping Redcaw Crayfish.
       
      Male Blue                 Female White
       
      Disclaimer : The information contained in this article is purely from my own experiences and is by no means intended to be completely right in my findings Wayne Summerhayes
         


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    • sdlTBfanUK
      Did you measure the water capacity before you put anything in the tank, or after you had done the scaping? The rock/substrate etc uses up some of the capacity! I have never used CO2 and I think it is usually only used for plants (aquascaping) so don't think you need that unless you need it for the plants - hopefully some one more experienced will let you know about that? It looks like there is a cycle going on but I have never actually 'SEEN' this myself  so I am not too sure what stage you are at with it (I'm not being much help........) all I had with my tanks was a bacteria bloom for a couple of days, though I wasn't very good at checking in all truth - should have done more (daily) tests really at this stage. When the Ammonia and Nitrate/ite are the same as the ones in the pail you should be there I think as those look perfect. Aside from the TDS the other parameters also look very close so you should be ok there as well? I looked at the pictures of the shrimp and they looked orange to me, but maybe the pink pale made them look less yellow? Shouldn't be much longer before you can transfer the shrimp, always a relief as you will be able to see them better and can clear the pail away!  Simon ps I will leave the stone post you have done to others as although I have 'bits' of rock in my tanks I haven't had a problem and don't know about that!
    • jojowhisky
      Some of the rocks i had.
      Light grey being either seiryu or sekyri rock, till now i cant be sure.
      Reddish coloured rock is dragon stone. (Safer option)

      Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk

    • jojowhisky
      Hello everyone! So recently i got down to scape my 2nd tank. This time for hardscape i decided i was going to use rocks instead of driftwood. As i had already a small inventory of rocks of different kinds from too many trips to the fish store(hands up people), i could not decide which ones to use!  I learnt a lesson in the end to just stick with what you know to be safe and inert. Especially if the intended livestock for the tank are soft water lovers.  Because the local fish stores that i patronize do not have correct labels of the rocks they sell, i had to experiment and research on them as much as i could.  Most of the rocks look so similar and matching them to pictures on the internet proved to be more frustrating.  So to use or not to use? Rule of thumb, if you are not too sure, dunk the rocks intended to use in a pail of water and test its ph, if it changes, dont use that. The vinegar test is a hit or miss. I got too carried away looking at the beautiful scapes from ADA and went out to buy the same light grey coloured rocks only to find out that they can alter the ph by a ton. A fish store owner told me to ask for an exchange of those seiryu rocks i purchased from another store as he said his friend had the ph climbed to 9.4 in his 10gallon, just half a day with just one of that rock.  Got my exchange thankfully but store ower was very displeased to do that:( Sign...   Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk    
    • jojowhisky
      Hi simon!
      Alot had happened on the week i was supposed to do the tank. Things did not go according to plan!
      Had plans to finish 2 tanks, one for the yellow neos another for the tetras.
      However just as i was starting to get things going, i noticed that the tetras were down with something! Looked to be fungal. Anyways that will be another thread in the correct department, better not rattle off here and go off topic again.
      Anyways back to the subject of this tank for the yellow neos.

      Yep i did manage to measure the amount of water in this tank. I topped it up to exactly 9litres, erm, it got to be really full, thankfully weather here was very warm so evaporation brought it down to a more comfortable level so im gonna say it can hold 7 to 8litres well. 9litres being too full.

      The glass contraption is a co2 diffuser. Im using neo co2, product is made in korea and its basically running like a diy co2 setup. Just that this comes with the solution mix, bottle, tubing and diffuser. All you need to do is to just mix warm water to the mix as per instruction and it will do the rest of the job for you.

      Yep this tank came with a glass lid, only thing it is not a full covering lid. The lid is only half the size of the top of the tank. So you would only be able to cover half the tank.

      Now the technical bit. You beat me to it because i was going to ask if i can assume my tank HAS already started the process of cycling?
      Here the parameters.

      Tds: 159
      NH4: <0.05
      No3: 25
      No2: 2
      Gh: 4
      Kh: 4
      Ph: 6.4 (test strip reading, ph pen coming in the mail, the pen HAD to spoil when i started the project of course.)
      This is week 2, 1st water change of 2litres with pure distilled water tds 004
      Above readings were taken 3hours after water change.

      Pail parameters
      Tds: 268
      Nh4: <0.05
      No3: 10
      No2: 0
      Gh: 5
      Kh: 4
      Ph: 6.4
      This reading was done 3 days after water change.

      Yep on the issue of the identity of these shrimps. I think we can just assume they are yellow neos, precisely what you said, they are so hardy!
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Good to see you back, I was wondering what was happening? You have a good eye as the tank looks great! Glad to hear the shrimps are still doing ok in the pail as well. Did you measure the amount of water you pit in the tank, if it is a 10L TANK, I would guess about 6L with all the soil/rock etc? Not sure what the glass tube thing is on the right hand side? Do you have a clear lid/cover for the tank to reduce any evaporation? Do you know whether the cycle has started yet, ie any ammonia/nitrite/nitrate readings? Is it running similar water parameters as the pail the shrimps are in, I would guess they are neos as they are the hardier shrimps? Keep up the good work and I look forward to following the progress.  Simon
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