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Chindy

clear slime in tank

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Chindy    5
Chindy

hi guys a couple of weeks ago I put some boss baby powder in my tank and a couple of days later my java moss started getting covered in a clear slime. maybe its unrelated to the baby powder I thought it might be a mass of bio film. has this happened to anyone else as I want to know if it would be harmful to shrimp thanks in advance

 

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jayc    1,401
jayc

Clear slime in an aquarium is probably a form of water mould.

It is common in new tanks. Is this a new tank?

Other possible sources are from driftwood from pine or another tree containing large amounts of sap, a DIY carbon dioxide system, a decoration not intended for aquarium use, residual medications or overfeeding (leading to high phosphates).

A close up picture might help pinpoint the issue.

What do you have in the tank? driftwood, plants, plastic ornaments, and livestock.

Regular water changes will help. If you have a UV steriliser, turn that on.

 

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Chindy    5
Chindy

ae683535194d5a1383856576691bac18.jpg1cceb64e9020e0c0f02fc5db016c0787.jpg

 

 

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Not not new setup and it seems to have happened after I put the boss baby powder in.This is what slime looks like doesn't seem to bother shrimp though but would like to get rid of it

 

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Madmerv    130
Madmerv

A 3% hydrogen Peroxide dose might do the job for you. Give it a test on a small area first so you dont damage the moss. 

I have used a 6% dose on some java moss in my tank and the moss was not affected by it but i didnt care about the java as i actually want it gone. 

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jayc    1,401
jayc

That almost looks like Blue Green Algae (BGA). But I could be wrong.

If it's only on that clump of moss, remove it along with the cave, and treat it outside the tank. If nothing else it minimises the spread.

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