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    • daveron
      By daveron
      Hi
      I have an issue with my old tank, which is around 3 years right now and the issue is NO3.
      Currently I am forced to do 25-30% water changes twice a week, and this is just enough to keep the NO3 below 10 (which is still way to high!). I have no idea what is causing the NO3 to raise so quickly as there is just around 50 shrimp and nothing more.
      The tank is 30L (8 gal), inert substrate, heavily planted, I add no fertilizers.
      Plants are duckweed, anubias, cryptocoryne, and eleocharis parvula carpet.
      Two HOB filters - one is sponge, the other one is small sponge + peat + JBL nitratex + seachem matrix (I added two weeks ago, as this thing is supposed to bring down nitrates, but so far no results).
      For water changes I use salty shrimp GH +, Azoo Triple Black Water, Azoo Mineral Plus(every second week) and Azoo Ph Down, to adjust the pH of the water that goes into the tank with what's already there.
      As for bacteria I add seachem pristine, and seachem stability once a week around 2ml of each.
      Feeding is once per 2-3 days, small amounts that gets eaten in a few hours.
      So I had that issue already around 5 months back and what I did is bought the JBL bionitratex and added duckweed, and it did solved the problem but to get a good result I had to use two bags of the JBL product for a single tank (the product comes with 4 bags total). Now this thing is quiet expensive imo for the time it lasts, so I would like to ask for any other options to keep the NO3 in check, as the plants are clearly not able to handle that.
      From my observations - there is a substantial amount of muck in the substrate, but since the tank is heavily planted I cannot vacuum it.
      If needed I can provide some pictures of the tank.
      Your help greatly appreciated !
    • revolutionhope
      By revolutionhope
      Hey SKF,
      I've recently started adding 2ppm of nitrates to my weekly/fortnightly waterchanges as my tank constantly had zero nitrates and my plants were looking hungry. The product I use is cal aqua labs green.
      I'd like to know what people's experiences or opinions are on whether small amounts of fertiliser can be added to shrimp tanks WITHOUT dripping it in slowly (as in a typical waterchange which is what I'm currently doing)
      In other words; if I directly dose the 1 or 2 ppm worth of nitrates to my aquarium without slowly dripping it into the tank would it have any negative impact on the health and/or breeding of crystal or tiger shrimps?
      love n peace
      will


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  • Posts

    • Myola
      So here's the thing. I've got 6 bare-bottom neo tanks that have been chugging along just fine for quite a while now. There are lots of babies and it's extremely rare to have any deaths, even when I add new shrimp.  I use remineralised rain water that has been filtered through an RO. I stopped using substrates in the tanks after I had ongoing issues with it breaking down, and to be honest, I wouldn't go back. Now I want to start some caridina tanks for tangerine tigers, CRS and blue bolts but want to know if I can get away with bare bottoms in them too. My RO filtered rain water comes out at pH 5, and when I add Salty Shrimp 'Bee shrimp' minerals to give me a GH of 5, the pH goes up to around 5.8. Do I really need the buffering affects of a substrate if my water is already within an acceptable range for caridinas? 
    • jayc
      It must have been an aluminium heatsink. The Indium in Liquid metal will eat through aluminium. Only copper or nickel plated heatsinks can be used with liquid metal. It says so on the packet, at least my pack of Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut does.
    • jayc
    • kms
      I will try to add all the old tank's shrimps at the end of August to the new tank, had a problem with my chiller this morning, try to make it more efficient by adding a better heat sink grease, I added a liquid metal grease, apparently you can't add liquid metal, when heating up, the heat sink turning to dust, along with part of the cooler inlet and outlet. So far the shrimps are ok.    
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I have had the new shrimps a week and have ordered some new ones(10) for delivery friday. There are probably at least 6 of the 8 alive (they may even all be alive still) but as the tank is so densely planted it is difficult to tell, but I saw 2 black and 2 red this morning, as yesterday, but I'm sure 1 red and  1 black weren't the same as the ones I saw yesterday so there are probably at least 6, if that makes any sense??? Anyway that will be it for now and I will just let the tank and shrimps do there thing once this batch are in there in a couple of days, and I can get back to the usual routine as was, before this unfortunate event wiped out the last lot. All parameters are good, including the nitrates now, but there are a lot of brown patches on the plants and moss balls still......... It all looks a bit drab and uninspiring and brown!!! I probably just need to be a bit more patient? I will do some maintenance tomorrow and a small 2L water change, then the new shrimps will go in on friday after acclimatising. The shrimps were totally uninterested in the spinach or shrimp lolly I put in at the weekend but I am assuming they have so much biofilm at this stage that that is keeping them busy and well fed and they are staying under cover until they get used to their new environment and this strange ugly monster that keeps peering in at them through the glass from time to time? I guess if some 100ft tall bloke kept peering through my window a few times a day I would be a bit nervous/reserved shall we say? I removed the spinach and the shrimp lolly and put the shrimp lolly in the betta tank and within minutes there were 10 shrimp on it so there was definitely nothing wrong with that shrimp lolly! Simon
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