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Bluebolt highest death rate


Radjabatak
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Hi everyone,

Greetings from Indonesia ?

I need a solution here about my bluebolt,

I bought 10 bluebolt to start new colony in a tank 30*40*40 it had been cycle 2 months and the parameter nitrit 0 nitrate 10 pH 5,5 tds 100 GH 4 KH 0, 

At first month the bb started faded the colour, and one by one they death and left 5 of them, and then I bought again 15 more, and the killing's continue until now I only had 12.. I water changed every 1 one week 20%. I always took water test and the parameter is always fine, nitrite below 10 and pH constantly in 5,5. Ammonia is 0. Can anyone help me what am I do wrong.. so sad to be honest losing the beautiful creature..

Sorry for my bad English, keep safe everyone

 

 

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We should probably start with the basics. What water are you using as only RO water with remineraliser is probably going to work, even if your water source has the right parameters. I have experienced this in the past with tap water and had similar happen as you are experiencing!

The other problem you may be having is your temperature there is too high, do you know what the waater temperature in the tank is. I looked at the internet and your about 33 degrees in general, taiwan bee shrimp would struggle above 27 degrees and probably start dying around 30 degrees (water temperature). As a temporary fix you could get a couple of bottles of water, freeze them laying flat, then put 1 in the tank, when it has thawed out swap with the one in the freezer. Of coarse you will need to think of something more longer term?

You could also reduce your weekly water change to 10% and make sure you add new water very gradually,  some sort of dripper is best. I doubt this is your problem but just an additional note.

Simon

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11 minutes ago, sdlTBfanUK said:

The other problem you may be having is your temperature there is too high

Agree with Simon here.

What is your water temp?

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Hi jayc and Simon, my water temperature is 23 c and I'm using RO water and mineral to match the tds and GH, for my remineraliser the tds 100 is equal to GH 4.. that's why I set the tds 100.. but still... They died too.. any idea to help me?

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That temperature is good so as ong as water stays at that and doesn't go up at any point in the day that is fine. Using RO + minerals should also be perfect!

When you get shrimp you should always drip acclimate them, otherwise you get deaths for up to a few weeks later.

What sort of setup do you have and what is in the tank, substrate, plants, filter, other etc?

When the shrimp die do they have anything to them that may help, apart from losing colour that you already mentioned?

Where did you get the shrimps from, was it a reliable source such as a breeder?

Simon

Edited by sdlTBfanUK
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Thx for replying Simon,

I have UGf (filter pad at bottom, and second layer substrate bactersand lowkeys) and qanvee double sponge with Bacter media "neo soft" (the media can buffer the Water too)

Plant just  duckweed,marimo moss ball and shrimp shelter.

I always drip acclamation my shrimp with 1 drop per second, and it take hours before I put in the tank...

They died like usual, just standing on their feet, I think they swarming the soil to find food.. but the fact the shrimp is almost dying... They loose the colour 3-4 days before dying...

I get the shrimp from a reliable breeder, but their tds is 120 GH 4 (he is using lowkeys mineral GH+ tds 120= GH 4)

I don't use the low-key, I used local remineraliser tds 100= GH 4 (using tetra test kit for GH)

 

Really confusing, is the pH is too low?

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I don't think the PH is too low, unless the test starts at 5.5 then it may be anything below 5.5? Mine was PH5 - PH5.5!

Is the remineraliser meant for shrimps specifically or just general?

Do you feed the shrimps, as there isn't much surface area (leaves etc) for biofilm to grow? Maybe get some indian almond leaves and Bacter AE if that is readily available to you? If they are swarming to find food, maybe there isn't sufficient food to support the colony?

Simon

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They behaved strangely, if I turned on the lamp, they will hide in the almond leaves, yes I feed the every 2 days, I feed the Bacter are, snow flake and others... 

The remineraliser is for shrimp only

About the pH, I test it with tetra test kit, and it only began with pH 5, and the pH is sometimes 5 (1 day after WC) and 5,5 if I just water change the tank... I already turned the aerator widely, so I don't think they lack of O2... So really don't understand what happen

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That all sounds good and you seem to have everything you need and I can't see anything obviously wrong from what you have said!

You may have to just give it a bit more time for the tank to settle down.Unfortunately it is similar to my last attempt where I ended up giving up with shrimps in that tank and put fish in the tank instead! With mine I assume it was the substrate but I don't realy know, but the parameters have always been ideal but the plants aren't doing as well as they did with a different substrate? When my fish die off I will try again with the same substrate that worked well before!

You can try looking in the disease thread of this website just to see if anything there may look like an issue!

Simon

 

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I can't see anything wrong either.

You can try increasing TDS to 120, and pH to 6.0. Just to give yourself a small buffer in case test kit measurements are a bit inaccurate.

 

 

 

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Hi jayc,

Hm, I'd like to know what is the parameter for bluebolt? I'm afraid if I raise the tds the GH will be messy..

How I buffer the pH?

 

 

Regards,

 

 

 

Robin

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4 hours ago, Radjabatak said:

I'd like to know what is the parameter for bluebolt?

GH 4 to 6

KH 0-1

pH 6 - 6.5

TDS 120 - 150

Temperature 68°F to 72°F (20°C to 22°C).

 

4 hours ago, Radjabatak said:

I'm afraid if I raise the tds the GH will be messy

Raising TDS from 100 to 120 as I suggested is only a very small amount. At most, your GH will only go up by 1.

 

4 hours ago, Radjabatak said:

How I buffer the pH?

Do you mean ... how do you increase pH?

Raise KH is the answer.

If your pH is at 5.0 now, you will only need a bit of carbonates to raise it up to 6.0.

What is the KH of your tap water in Indonesia?

You can use dechlorinated tap water. Mix a bit with your RO water during water changes.

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Generally accepted parameters range for Taiwan bee are GH 4 - 6, TDS 100 - 160, so you maybe should try getting nearer the middle of those figures as you are at the lower end, do it slowly though by adding just a small amount of remineraliser each day!

Simon

Edit, looks like JayC and I cross posted at same time. I would be reluctant to mess wth the PH as you probably have ammonium in the tank at the moment with your PH, whereas that converts to ammonia when PH is increased and that would cause a whole new problem with cycling. Ammonium is harmless to shrimps, where as ammonia is toxic so increasing the PH should be done by cycling the tank without the shrimps in it. A lot of people who have been very succcessful in shrimp keeping have PH below 6, my tank ran at 5.5 but started about 5 so similar to yours and was very successful.

https://www.shrimpcorner.co.uk/freshwater-shrimp/blue-bolt-shrimp.html

 

Edited by sdlTBfanUK
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  • 1 month later...

Hi Simon and jayc

After I read the shrimp disease topic I think my shrimps are having bacterial infection.. loss of colour, and the antenae, and when the shrimp dead their head have brown colour... 

The bb is still dying every week, than my friend ask me to water change for 40%  and put seachem stability routine.. it have been almost a week now, and 0 death.. oh btw the bb is 5 left in the tank. They seem happy now and actively, but I don't know maybe I'm wrong..

Really sad having a lot of death in the tank...

 

 

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If the deaths have stopped, then that is good news.

Keep a close eye on them and look for brown spots, like the shell is rusting.

All you should do know is make sure the tank parameters are stable and give them a clean, cycled tank.

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Hi Simon,

the one that had the rusty shell already dead... Hope everything gonna be okay, really desperate having high death rate in the tank.. may I know what causing the bacterial infection? The antennae is short.. is bb  antennae is short or long?

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Hopefully you are over the problem and all goes well from here onwards, as JayC says, just keep a close eye on them for a while. I did have rust on a few in my mixed tank, always red ruby bizarrely, none of the others and they were all shrimps I had for about a year so can't blame the person I bought them from! It went on for a while with me just culling the odd shrimp every few weeks (1) and didn't seem to spread, so hopefully that will be what happens with yours and the remaining will be fine.

All the taiwan bee have long antenae normally so as above just keep an eye on them, the antenae may grow back with time.

I think it is usually down to poor water quality and/or nitrates which weaken the shrimps immune system and then the bacteria attack! That may explain why the large water change you did helped/stopped it? Or it may have not been properly cycled and hopefully it now is? A lot of times the bacteria are always in the tank but harmless to healthy unstressed shrimp! I see from your first post you were doing 20% water change each week and so that should be ok, as long as you add the new water very slowly (a dripper is best) and the parameters of the old and new water aren't too different. You could reduce that to 10% each week as shrimp aren't very messy and that should reduce any fluctuations?

I hope it all continues to do well, keep an eye on the shrimp for now and let us know if you are still having problesms, hopefully you have a mix of male and female, and they will help replace the dead shrimps and increase your colony! 

Simon

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    • sdlTBfanUK
      You may end up losing this batch entirely but then you can start completely fresh and get the aquarium set up right for the next batch of shrimp! If you do any large water changes then try and add the new water slowly, either dripper or some other way. You should get yourself a TDS meter (as JayC above), they are cheap and readily available. You should always use a GH tester kit as well with shrimps, if you do the 50% water change that should halve the GH so you should get a reading after that, or if you can get a local fish store to test it for you that will give you an idea of the GH. If your water supply is as hard as it appears it may be you will need to mull over how (or even IF) you want to keep shrimps as that may mean using RO or distilled/bottled water and buying a proper shrimp specific remineraliser? That will be quite expensive but you won't then have to mess about adding crushed coral/eggshells etc, but only you can decide whether you want to do/spend that much etc? If you live somewhere that gets a lot of rain, then you can use rain water? Also, as JayC states, you need to know what you are using/adding to the water and aquarium, ie fertilizers, rocks. Unless you have very exotic plants you shouldn't need any fertilizers. Just as a note, we have come across quite a few experienced fish keeprs that have this sort of start off issues with shrimp. Shrimp are more difficult than fish, and the aquarium and water etc need to be ready and within the required parameters before getting the shrimps. Usually people jump in, get the shrimps before everything is ready/sorted. Hopefully though you will keep at it, or if this lot die you will have another go and we can help you get it sorted?
    • jayc
      These are all classic symptoms of shrimp moulting problems.   Again, another high GH symptom. High GH not only causes harder carapace (shell), but it also makes eggs harder. When the egg is harder the male finds it more difficult to fertilise the eggs.   That's a worry if you can't get a good GH reading because that is going to be most likely issue right now for you.   Because snails don't moult.    If you dont already have a TDS meter, I suggest getting one asap. It's another test to narrow down your water parameters, and not have to trust one test by it's own - in this case the GH test kit. I would wager your water parameter is too high in dissolved minerals - likely from the tap water source, fertiliser dosing and/or any rocks/crushed corals you might have in the tank. To remedy this, you need to start doing water changes with RO, distilled or rain water immediately. I would do a 50% water change with RO water asap. Then look for sources that increase GH in the tank and eliminate it - fertilisers, rocks, crush corals, shells.    It's difficult to save a shrimp who's carapace is already too hard, but hopefully any younger shrimps will benefit from the water change and the reduced GH.   Good luck and keep us updated.
    • professionalshrimphugger
      United States. I have tested my tap water; it yields the same results. GH: ??, KH: 3, pH: 7.8. I cannot say for sure if my GH test is faulty or not, the expiration is until 2023. It's more of a twitching, then stasis. I have one shrimp that's having a hard time balancing itself, but it's swimmerets and mouth keep moving in attempt in getting back up. I allowed it to stick to my sponge filter. The tank is cycled. I used established media. Readings would not show 0 otherwise. I do use EI Dosing, half dosage recommended for a 20 gallon. It has been said on other forums that it does not affect shrimp, but I stopped dosing to isolate variables a week ago. No CO2, that's too costly for me, hah. I drip acclimated the shrimp for 2 hours, 1 drop per second. I tested for copper in my tank, nothing. Funnily enough, my mystery snails in my community tank don't seem too affected by it.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry to hear you are having a problem! Where are you based in the world? Can you test your tapwater GH/KH/PH? Best to know what the source water is, dechlorinated (if required) before you have ADDED anything. Are you sure the GH test is working and not old, or already activated/contaminated somehow? The other parameters seem ok! If the GH is as ridiculousy high as you say then I expect the shrimps would have problems molting (they may be twitching to get out of the old shell), though generally twitchy behaviour is usually down to some sort of toxic poisoning or the aquarium not being properly cycled? Are you using any plant fertiser or CO2?  Did you drip acclimate the shrimp over many hours before adding them to the aquarium? They are much more sensitive than fish to changes in water parameters etc. You could end up killing more of them by moving them so I would hold off from that at the moment!  
    • professionalshrimphugger
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