Dooliga

How do you stop your shrimp from escaping?

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Dooliga

Hi,

I am trying to prepare my aquarium for shrimp -- in particular Riffle Shrimp.

After reading that these are escape experts I was momentarily put off the idea because I was aware of definite escape routes that they could easily crawl along and out through. But I'd quickly pushed that reluctance aside to focus on a solution. There has to be one. SKF forum members surely have one.

Escape routes in my set up are: specifically the filter inlet and outlet, along with light attachment clips and wave-maker power cord.

I first thought of perspex cut to fit, but that would be near impossible to fit perfectly and I suspect they only need 2-3 mm to squeeze through? I figured something that was flexible/moldable would be more suitable. I was thinking maybe some fine stainless wire mesh  that's used for moss attachment? But that's probably a bit expensive for the size of the pieces i'd need? Or flywire? Or perhaps some security door screen, but i'd be worried about paint leeching into the water as that stuff may likely rust with time? 

Anyone have any ideas? I couldn't find a thread/topic when I searched of 'shrimp escaping'. I'm pretty sure someone here has a simple solution. What do you do to stop your shrimp escaping?

D

Apologies to Admin: I originally thought to add this to my thread on Riffles as I thought it was appropriate under the topic of planning a tank set up for them, but I was unable to add a further photo to illustrate what I'm trying to find a solution for (I'd reached the image upload limit). I figure this topic fits under 'Shrimp Health & Care'. Please move or delete or edit as you see fit. Thank you.



 

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jayc

@Dooliga,

Make sure you leave sufficient space between the water surface and top of the tank.

I use a triangular plastic piece cut out of clear Binding Covers A4 sheets. It's placed in the corners where the filter hoses are. https://www.officeworks.com.au/shop/officeworks/p/cumberland-binding-covers-a4-clear-100-pack-cuombsa4

We have these at work 😉 

Cost = $0

 

Riffles generally climb out at the corners if there is a cable or pipe there.


A picture,  speaks a 1000 words. So I'll try taking one tonight when I get home from work.

But here is a drawing to start with. 

Untitled.jpg.ac3ae2a78c93e368a120099a089fd006.jpg

It's just a triangular plastic piece. Cut along the dotted line's to create a circular hole in the middle for the filter pipe. Slide this over are each corner where there are cables or hoses coming out.

 

Edited by jayc

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Dooliga

Thank you Jayc, 

What you are describing makes a lot of sense, is cheap and I can envisage that it's effective.  But, if you have time may I see a pic please?

Cheers,

D

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jayc
2 hours ago, Dooliga said:

if you have time may I see a pic please?

Thanks for the reminder. Wasn't even sure you saw my post above.

 

2 hours ago, Dooliga said:

makes a lot of sense, is cheap

Hey! that's me to the letter.

 

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jayc

This is what I use on one corner...

20180208_083024.thumb.jpg.f55561bdb4d71d5dc12be457582e4017.jpg20180208_083115.thumb.jpg.495b0afc99d7bf74f084fbee9171328c.jpg

 

 

The following was the prototype, which  I still use because it is easier to remove and replace, thanks to the larger channel cutout. I use it occasionally when I need to remove the pipes often, say like during cleaning time. You see the final product above was much more refine than the prototype.

20180208_083327.thumb.jpg.5347fd2d0889e192c943a45dff03c19e.jpg

 

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Dooliga

Thanks jayc, 

Pretty sure i can come up with something that will work in my set up. 

1 hour ago, jayc said:

Wasn't even sure you saw my post above.

I hadn't replied as I was processing your response to my overall plan for the tank's set up. I've been checking the forum multiple times a day since I made that first post and reading more (enjoying it, very inspiring). Sorry I didn't reply sooner.

I hope the above helps some others too. Find it interesting that other's haven't chimed in with what they do.

Cheers,

 

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jayc
7 hours ago, Dooliga said:

Pretty sure i can come up with something that will work in my set up. 

If you improve on it, let us know.

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