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Heidi

New Nerite Snail Behaviour? / Any Sellers in Au?

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Heidi

Hello! I'm new here and not sure if this is the way to ask questions or not so please let me know if I'm meant to do it some other way.

I recently received 3 nerite snails last Wednesday and two were DOA (dead on arrival). Actually, there wasnt even anything inside the two shells!! One however, was alive but in bad shape as its shell was not in good condition so I am going to provide it with calcium powder soon. I've read that they take a little time to adjust to new environments but the little guy hasnt moved since he arrived. I gently tugged on his trapdoor and he resisted so I assume he is alive as he also doesn't smell rotten. I've tried putting kale or algae wafers under him but nothing ): Does fluval stratum substrate have copper in it because I've heard that they are sensitive to copper and that is the substrate I am using which I didnt even think about! 

I was also wondering if there were any Aussie sellers here that have any of the black nerite snail variety? I heard that they are legal here but please correct me if I am wrong.

So sorry for the long post.. any response would be greatly appreciated! 😊

Edited by Heidi

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fishmosy

Hey Heidi, yes some freshwater nerites are native to Australia but they are only available rarely. The true freshwater nerite that is available is called Neritina pulligera, one common name is the baseball cap nerite. They get up to around 4-5cm. I have some of these which I've had for several years. They don't seem to eat artificial foods but instead feed on the algae and biofilm growing in a tank.

Assuming you have a good amount of biofilm growing in your tank, your nerite doesn't need to be fed. In fact, moving it around and trying to feed it will only make it stay in its shell. Note that nerites tend to be more nocturnal (active at night) when they are first introduced to aquariums, but slowly became more active during the day. 

One more thing - the fact that you had two nerites arrive as shells only suggests you may have dealt with a dodgy seller. If so, you may need to check if you have a true freshwater nerite. Several nerites live in brackish and seawater that could appear in the hobby. In fact, the nerites that appear in rock pools will tolerate low salinity / freshwater for short periods - they have to in the wild when it rains - but they will eventually die if kept in a freshwater aquaria. Best to see if you can ID which nerite you have.

 

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jc12

Hi Heidi, welcome to the forum.

I know Dave from Aquagreen sells the native nerites Neritina violacea. Check out their catalogue here: http://www.aquagreen.com.au/catalog.html

This is a short write up on the Neritina violacea: http://www.aquagreen.com.au/plant_data/Neritina_violacea.html

15 hours ago, fishmosy said:

The true freshwater nerite that is available is called Neritina pulligera, one common name is the baseball cap nerite. They get up to around 4-5cm. I have some of these which I've had for several years. They don't seem to eat artificial foods but instead feed on the algae and biofilm growing in a tank.

Very keen if you have any to spare together with the c. wilkinsi when you are able to source them. :happy:

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Heidi

Thank you both for your replies!! I didn't see these messages as I didnt receive an email for some reason..

Anyhow, sadly the snail I was talking about has died and I have just received 3 new ones. Two are moving around (1 is a lot more active) and the third one has a big pit in its shell like the one before ): I will try my best to take care of them and I am sure that the most active one is the neritina violacea kind. Definitely looks like it. I've supplied the guys with some cuttle bone I stuck in the filter and hopefully it wont bother my betta!

I sent Dave an email about the snails and hopefully I hear a reply. They are very rare here! I'm planning to purchase two more for my sorority and two will stay in Pluto's (my betta) tank.

Are they bothered by a neutral pH? I've heard that can deteriorate their shells and I do have the fluval stratum substrate in there which does lower the pH. I tested it the other day and it's a little over neutral so should that be okay?

Edited by Heidi

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