Clicky

Jump to content
KeenShrimp

I found the snails I was looking for!

Recommended Posts

KeenShrimp

Ooooh I am so excited about this! I received my snail package yesterday: Spiny Marsh Snails ( Thiara Amarula), Giant Cone Snails (unsure what these are ), Assorted Nerites ( not being an expert, I am unsure of exact types, but I have some with striated tan/black pattern, spots, zigzag, olive and black), and Singapore Spiraling snails that have black shells ( these are actually from China, but don't mass produce). I asked one of the online stores that I buy from whether they could get some for me and it turns out one could. They are not exactly cheap, but one has to keep in mind that they are responsibly sourced, they don't mass produce, are stunning to look at, are quite large, and whomever the person is that has to dig them out in murky crocodile infested water, with mosquitoes and 40 degrees Celsius plus weather with leeches definitely deserves to get paid by those of us with a higher sense of self-preservation in my opinion!) I am not a photographer, and had to rush to get a few pics. None of the snails are in too acidic water, seem to like algae wafers, and love digging in the substrate. The shrimp follow the snails as they borrow through the soil and forage on the upturned biofilm. If anyone would like to know where to buy them, you are welcome to pm me as I am not sure whether I am allowed to post the suppliers details on here.

P3231497.JPG

P3241502.JPG

P3231485.JPG

P3231478.JPG

P3241508.JPG

P3241506.JPG

P3241505.JPG

P3231474.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
waffle

Awesome find dude!! They look great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fishmosy

The giant cone snails will almost certainly be Stenomelania cf. aspirans. keep all the snails you mentioned in a pH above 7 otherwise their shell erodes and they will die. 

The cone snails will likely quickly become your favourites. They are certainly mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KeenShrimp

Thanks fishmosy, will do ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Baccus

Great snails, I really like the spiney marsh snails. The second snail picture looks like some type of notopala, if that is the one that say is was from China then it could be also known as a  trapdoor snail (either Chinese or Japanese), but I wasn't aware of them actually having colourful bodies like that. I am pretty sure that the Chinese trapdoor snail breeds the same way as notopala and mystery snails in needing a male and a female but then have live births unlike mystery snails that will lay a cluster of eggs above the water.

Certainly interesting times ahead for you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Linden

I'm on the search for snails now. Everything listed here. Very excited. I love snails. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Linden

Ended up getting quite a selection. Much like 'Keenshrimp' s order. 

Giant cone snails $16 each!! Spiny marsh. Also $16 each. 20 Singapore Spiral Snails SSS. A dozen nerites and chestnut mystery snails. All to add to the collection. Remaining ever vigilant to find other snails. Especially other colour varieties like blue ramshorn and purple mystery snails. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Baccus

I don't think I have ever seen blue Ramshorns in Australia (I suspect they maybe be more of an American/ Europe thing) just like giant ramshorns. Years ago I recall there being different coloured mystery snails readily available at pet shops and then for some reason the other colours just disappeared and only the gold was commonly available.

I have pink ramshorns but can not be certain they throw 100% pink babies without more browns emerging out of each clutch of eggs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Linden

I chanced upon someone who has blue and pink ramshorns. Looking forward to a purchase from him. 

Also a Gumtree listing of a mystery snail collector earlier this year who has 4 of the unusual colour formations like blue, ivory and purple. Also variations of light and dark foot. Sadly wasn't willing to post interstate. 

So they're out there. And I'll keep looking and work towards breeding to provide to others once I get some stable colonies together. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Melanoides tuberculata, commonly known as Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS), originated from all over Africa and Southern Asia. MTS are generally introduced into fish tanks accidentally by being attached to new plants or used aquarium decorations. They can come in a range of shapes, patterns and sizes. Opinions on MTS are divided with most having a strong dislike to them due to how quickly they breed and take over a tank. However, these snails can also be beneficial. As they move eating detritus and leftover food under the substrate, they are also aerating it. This in turn supports root growth and air exchange which are great in planted tanks.
      How Do They Breed
      Malaysian Trumpet Snails breed extremely fast, particularly in good tank conditions. The rapid breeding abilities of the MTS is one of the main reasons they are a concern to aquatic tank keepers. One method that works well with our members here is to use some vegetables like a sliced cucumber. Turn the lights off, wait a little while and remove. You can also limit their population growth by being strict with your feeding regime and removing any uneaten food from the tank. Take note though, without the use of a chemical deterrent, which is harmful to your other invertebrates, it will be unlikely that you can remove 100% of them.
      What Do They Eat
      They are not difficult to feed. Primarily, Malaysian Trumpet Snails consume large amounts of algae and detritus. They are also good scavengers – eating leftover food and fish waste as they burrow underneath the substrate; thus, doing their share of cleaning the tank. They are especially helpful to aquarists who collect messy freshwater fish, including goldfish, and who keeps live plants. No, MTS generally do not eat live plants. You can also supplement their diet by feeding them with leafy vegetables or any plant-based fish food. Just don’t overfeed them as this will cause a snail outbreak.
      Water Parameters
      These snails are not difficult to care for as they only require minimal attention. If the tank is good enough for your fish and/or shrimp, there is a good chance that it will be fine for them. That said, if you want to get technical, they should be kept in a freshwater tank range with the following water conditions:
      water temperature from 21° C to 26° C pH of 7.0 to 7.5 Sources:
      Vogler, R. E., Núñez, V., Gregoric, D. G., Beltramino, A. A., & Peso, J. G. (2012). Melanoides tuberculata: The history of an invader. Chapter, 3, 65-85.
        Image credit - @Paul Minett
       Image credit - Nogi

      View full article
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Melanoides tuberculata, commonly known as Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS), originated from all over Africa and Southern Asia. MTS are generally introduced into fish tanks accidentally by being attached to new plants or used aquarium decorations. They can come in a range of shapes, patterns and sizes. Opinions on MTS are divided with most having a strong dislike to them due to how quickly they breed and take over a tank. However, these snails can also be beneficial. As they move eating detritus and leftover food under the substrate, they are also aerating it. This in turn supports root growth and air exchange which are great in planted tanks.
      How Do They Breed
      Malaysian Trumpet Snails breed extremely fast, particularly in good tank conditions. The rapid breeding abilities of the MTS is one of the main reasons they are a concern to aquatic tank keepers. One method that works well with our members here is to use some vegetables like a sliced cucumber. Turn the lights off, wait a little while and remove. You can also limit their population growth by being strict with your feeding regime and removing any uneaten food from the tank. Take note though, without the use of a chemical deterrent, which is harmful to your other invertebrates, it will be unlikely that you can remove 100% of them.
      What Do They Eat
      They are not difficult to feed. Primarily, Malaysian Trumpet Snails consume large amounts of algae and detritus. They are also good scavengers – eating leftover food and fish waste as they burrow underneath the substrate; thus, doing their share of cleaning the tank. They are especially helpful to aquarists who collect messy freshwater fish, including goldfish, and who keeps live plants. No, MTS generally do not eat live plants. You can also supplement their diet by feeding them with leafy vegetables or any plant-based fish food. Just don’t overfeed them as this will cause a snail outbreak.
      Water Parameters
      These snails are not difficult to care for as they only require minimal attention. If the tank is good enough for your fish and/or shrimp, there is a good chance that it will be fine for them. That said, if you want to get technical, they should be kept in a freshwater tank range with the following water conditions:
      water temperature from 21° C to 26° C pH of 7.0 to 7.5 Sources:
      Vogler, R. E., Núñez, V., Gregoric, D. G., Beltramino, A. A., & Peso, J. G. (2012). Melanoides tuberculata: The history of an invader. Chapter, 3, 65-85.
        Image credit - @Paul Minett
       Image credit - Nogi
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Planorbidae make up a significant portion of aquaitic pulmonate gastropods. In Australia alone, there are over 20 species group taxa that have been described. Their common name, ramshorn snails, comes from the spiral shape of their shells, which looks like a ram’s horn.
      Ramshorn snails come in a wide range of colours, including red, brown and black, and they can even be shimmery and translucent in colour. Because of the unique design on their shells and their colour, they can be a welcomed addition to an aquarium, offering vibrant colour and interest. However, oftentimes, these snails inadvertently appear in aquariums, hitchhiking on the live plants and/or accessories that have been transferred from one tank to another. If there is enough food available, these snails can quickly breed and take over an aquarium; but, if they are properly maintained, they can be a welcomed addition, even if their presence was not intended. These snails eat food that is leftover in the water, dead plant material and algae, and as such, they can help to maintain the health and appearance of an aquarium.
      Maintaining Ramshorn Snails
      Whether you are interested in adding ramshorn snails to your aquarium or they have taken up residence unexpectedly and you decide that you want to keep them, it’s important to understand how to properly maintain them, which fortunately, is easy to do.
      They do well in aquariums of various sizes. They are also very adaptable, which means that they can do well in various types of water conditions, though they prefer water that is filtered. Additionally, they do best in tanks that do not undergo sudden changes in their condition. These snails consume algae and food remnants from fish, but they prefer to eat dying and dead plant matter that is shed from live plants. They will also eat dead fish, shrimp or other snails.
       
      Things to Avoid
      If you are interested in maintaining Ramshorn snails in your aquarium, you should be aware that there are species of fish that will eat them. The most common predators of Ramshorn snails include bettas, loaches and dwarf puffer fish. Assassin snails will also prey on these snails.
      Live Plants
      Some people claim that Ramshorn snails destroy their live plants, while others have reported they do not cause any issues. However, in most cases, they do very little damage to live plants, but if a large amount of them are present and there are delicate plants in the aquarium, such as Water Sprite and Cabomba, they can do damage.
      Behaviour
      Ramshorn snails are peaceful and non-aggressive. They will not cause issues with fish, shrimp or other types of snails in an aquarium. They spend their time moving about the tank eating and adding interesting colour, texture and dimension to an aquarium.
      References
      Arctos. (n.d.). Retrieved May 7, 2017, from http://arctos.database.museum/name/Planorbidae 
      Brown, D. S. (2001). Freshwater snails of the genus Gyraulus (Planorbidae) in Australia: taxa of the mainland. Molluscan Research, 21(1), 17-107. doi:10.1080/13235818.2001.10673736
       Image credit - @Paul Minett
       
      View full article
       
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Planorbidae make up a significant portion of aquaitic pulmonate gastropods. In Australia alone, there are over 20 species group taxa that have been described. Their common name, ramshorn snails, comes from the spiral shape of their shells, which looks like a ram’s horn.
      Ramshorn snails come in a wide range of colours, including red, brown and black, and they can even be shimmery and translucent in colour. Because of the unique design on their shells and their colour, they can be a welcomed addition to an aquarium, offering vibrant colour and interest. However, oftentimes, these snails inadvertently appear in aquariums, hitchhiking on the live plants and/or accessories that have been transferred from one tank to another. If there is enough food available, these snails can quickly breed and take over an aquarium; but, if they are properly maintained, they can be a welcomed addition, even if their presence was not intended. These snails eat food that is leftover in the water, dead plant material and algae, and as such, they can help to maintain the health and appearance of an aquarium.
      Maintaining Ramshorn Snails
      Whether you are interested in adding ramshorn snails to your aquarium or they have taken up residence unexpectedly and you decide that you want to keep them, it’s important to understand how to properly maintain them, which fortunately, is easy to do.
      They do will in aquariums of various sizes. They are also very adaptable, which means that they can do well in various types of water conditions, though they prefer water that is filtered. Additionally, they do best in tanks that do not undergo sudden changes in their condition. These snails consume algae and food remnants from fish, but they prefer to eat dying and dead plant matter that is shed from live plants. They will also eat dead fish, shrimp or other snails.
       
      Things to Avoid
      If you are interested in maintaining Ramshorn snails in your aquarium, you should be aware that there are species of fish that will eat them. The most common predators of Ramshorn snails include bettas, loaches and dwarf puffer fish. Assassin snails will also prey on these snails.
      Live Plants
      Some people claim that Ramshorn snails destroy their live plants, while others have reported they do not cause any issues. However, in most cases, they do very little damage to live plants, but if a large amount of them are present and there are delicate plants in the aquarium, such as Water Sprite and Cabomba, they can do damage.
      Behaviour
      Ramshorn snails are peaceful and non-aggressive. They will not cause issues with fish, shrimp or other types of snails in an aquarium. They spend their time moving about the tank eating and adding interesting colour, texture and dimension to an aquarium.
      References
      Arctos. (n.d.). Retrieved May 7, 2017, from http://arctos.database.museum/name/Planorbidae 
      Brown, D. S. (2001). Freshwater snails of the genus Gyraulus (Planorbidae) in Australia: taxa of the mainland. Molluscan Research, 21(1), 17-107. doi:10.1080/13235818.2001.10673736
       Image credit - @Paul Minett
    • KeenShrimp
      By KeenShrimp
      I bought this Sudo Slim shrimp net as I was not happy with my current netting options. Found an unexpected awesome use for it: those annoying tiny snails on the walls of your aquarium glass? Because this net is so flexible and the wire rim where the edge meets the net is so thin, it is extremely easy to just scrape all of the snails with one swoop into the net. Highly recommended.
      Good quality netting material. It is of such a good weave that I catch seed-shrimp with it in my smaller tank.
      Only drawback: short handle, but one could argue that it gives you very good control of the net.
      Very good at shrimp catching too as there is no escape once the net is flush against the glass. My favourite net all- round.
      I will rate this net ????/5 shrimp tails
       



  • Must Read SKF Articles

  • Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

    Join Our Community!

  • Posts

    • jayc
      Indeed a good video. Except for his spelling of Desolved in TDS (should be Dissolved) I could not have done any better.  
    • jayc
      Yes of course! Forgot about high Nitrates, and of course illness. But we probably need to clarify "low temps" for anyone new to the hobby. Winter months can see water temps fall below the shrimp's preferred temp range. It might not be detrimental to their health but it does slow their metabolism down. The remedy for low temps isn't to just give them high temps either, it needs to be within their ideal preferred range for that specific shrimp, eg Neo Caridina or Caridina or Sulawesi. I have known some people to have shrimp (cherries) survive our Australian winter out in ponds. So they can tolerate fairly low temps for an extended period.  
    • nicpapa
      Also No3 , low Temp , and bacteria infections.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      This is a very good video on the basics if you are new to shrimps. It is called 'How to breed shrimp', not sure why as it is generally everything and a very good  and clear video guide?.  
    • jayc
      I find the wrong water parameters for the type of shrimp to be a big factor for lethargic shrimp. It's usually the first sign that something is not right. Any measurable amount of Ammonia, can also cause this behaviour.  Moulting is also a big factor in shrimps being inactive. Right before and right after the moult they hide and usually don't move. The moulting process is very strenuous on the shrimp, and I find protein rich foods (eg bloodworms) helps a ton.    
×