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pixie3004

Weird thing

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pixie3004

I found this in my shrimp tank. Can someone please let me know what on earth it is 9ed261878e47e20467d856a7f823d513.jpg I started my tank two months ago and I noticed something was eating my plants and then I found that in the tank

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jayc

I can't quite make it out.

But have a look at this thread http://shrimpkeepersforum.com/forum/topic/1384-aquariumtank-creatures-101/

to see if you can ID it.

 

Whatever it is, it's wouldn't have been good for the shrimp. Goo that you got it out.

But keep a look out for more.

Edited by jayc

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GotCrabs

@Callan might be able to help out with this, but I'd say it's a nasty and keep an eye out for more, if there is one, fair chance there could be a couple more.

Looks like a small moth or something still in cocoon stage.

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pixie3004

Thanks just neva heard of a month or butterfly hatching in water.... Strange

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pixie3004

Here is another pic from side

6431dd045caa42b21b6054de02d6353e.jpg

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GotCrabs

Could even be a Dragonfly larvae as well.

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Callan

It could be three things that I can think of.

Dragonfly Nymph Deadly to shrimp 

Caddisfly Larvae mainly feeds on plants but can also kill shrimp.....Look for silk threads on leaf on underside

Midge Mainly a leaf eater

I cant say for sure but I have checked my freshwater insect reference and I think Caddisfly larvae personally because in second photo it looks like a silk type cacoon

I would be checking because if there is one there could be more. Have you added new plants a cpouple of months ago. it is possible it came in on the plants as eggs. You may need to remove plants and treat. I would also be having a good look on substrate rocks etc for more. Hope this helps.

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pixie3004

There is definitely silk threads

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pixie3004

I am sure there are more. I have 4 pregnant females at the moment and don't wanna loose any babies. Is the only way to remove is by hand cause obviously you cant use killers?... Right? U have been great help thanks alot

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GotCrabs

Yeah I'd be removing my hand just to be safe and clear anything out that just doesn't look right.

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pixie3004

How do you treat the plants?

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GotCrabs

I think most people treat in diluted hydrogen peroxide, just dip them in a mix for a few seconds and then rinse under water before going back in the tank.

I've never had dramas insects/pests in the tank so other members might be able to tell you the treatment for sure.

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pixie3004

Thanks will do. I Googled all that was mentioned and it doesn't really look the same, but I will definitely remove

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pixie3004

Wish I didn't have either :-)

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jayc

H2O will kill the plant, if you dip it the plant in long enough to kill insect eggs or larvae.

Methylene Blue is more effective. 

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GotCrabs

Yeah pays to be safe, anything that doesn't look right, remove it for sure.

Can be a worry.

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Callan

Caddisfly larvae has two different stages of larvae. The fact that there is a silk like thread cocoon I would say that it is definately it. I would be confident that it came in on the plant in egg stage and that is why it has taken so long to show up .

You can use what GC has mentioned or you can use condy's crystal I had to buy mine of ebay. It's hard to get know.

Edited by Callan
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pixie3004

Thanks will try. Do you add in tank or how doe you use?

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jayc

You soak the plants in it BEFORE introducing the plant to the tank.

That is, it's an external treatment. Do not add it to your tank.

Edited by jayc

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pixie3004

Thank you

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Callan

And make sure that you rinse the plants before re-introducing to tank. Hydrogen peroxide can be used to direct dose black beard algae but in your case follow JayC,s directions and rinse. Good luck I would also do a check of substrate surface and on driftwood or rocks if applicable just to make sure you have no more hiding.

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fishmosy

H2O will kill the plant, if you dip it the plant in long enough to kill insect eggs or larvae.

I thought H2O was good for plants? :5565bf0371061_D:

Bloody di-hydrogen oxide. Terrible stuff. One of the most effective solvents in the world.......

 

.....  Maybe you mean H2O2 ? :facepalm:

 

 

Edited by fishmosy
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GotCrabs

Jesus, makes me sound bad saying dip it in hydrogen peroxide, I just mean a quick dip, and then rinse under water....

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pixie3004

Lol ? no fighting

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kizshrimp

Potassium Permanganate is the normal treatment for plants, a weak peroxide dip will probably work fine too. 

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