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Native submerse-growing ferns for the aquarium


fishmosy
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As alluded to here:

Bob and I found a few varieties of fern that may be suitable for use in aquaria. Here is the one we found in Little Mulgrave.

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In addition to the one pictured above, I have another two which are similar to java fern.

This is the first of the two:

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The rhizome on this one is really thick, about as thick as my thumb. The centre leaf has grown since the plant has been underwater. So far growth has been really slow. Bob gave me this one to look after as it was sitting in one of his tanks. I don't know where he got it or what habitat it came from, so hopefully Bob will enlighten us.

This one is currently in my Sunkist tank with typical cherry water parameters - TDS 200, ect ect.

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can't resist showing off my sunkists. thanks again @‌Bluebolts

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The one you are asking about Ben, came from Behanna creek near Gordonvale, it came from the zone that is dry in the dry season and under water in the wet, about 6 months of each. Heavy shade.

 

There is another piece of that plant in Melbourne with a member here. there is also a small version of that with lots more leaves near Kuranda

 

There is lots of plants that fit in that group, time to play with them is the issue OH and not enough tanks YET

 

Bob

 

PS   lots of fern types like the one you have

 

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Thanks Bob.

Here is the second fern I mentioned, collected from Harvey Creek. It has an almost compressed rhizome (as in oval section rather than round). Its doing quite well in with my Caridina confusa and snails.  The big leaf is the emerse form, its just starting to shoot the submerse leaves.

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Also  Bob found this fern in Short Creek and it has started shooting underwater as well. I had forgotten about it as it was mixed in with some other mosses.

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Finally there is also this plant. It was found in most of the locations we visited, really common. However I never saw it underwater, although it certainly would be under in times of flood, so I'm patiently waiting to see if it will shoot underwater. The roots seem to have gotten longer as they are white, but maybe that's just the shrimp picking away the stuff that is dying?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thought I would post some pics of the rare ferns and native moss. I have put it into my rifle tank and it is currently only getting sunlight through the window and about two hours a night of artificial light. It is growing really well  and has new fronds growing. It reminds me of a miniature version of a tree fern. I have tied one section of the fern to each end some driftwood and the native moss is in the middle of the two ferns. The shrimp seem to love munching on the dead fronds.

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Edited by Callan
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