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Bucephalandra, who's got what.


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I usually import to get new stock, but i do sell allot that i grow myself. The grow there best submerged. They like cool waters, i keep my tanks around 70F. As far as lighting goes medium to low light will do just fine. Co2 and ferts are not nesisary but you get way more colors and growth with co2 and ferts.

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I usually import to get new stock, but i do sell allot that i grow myself. The grow there best submerged. They like cool waters, i keep my tanks around 70F. As far as lighting goes medium to low light will do just fine. Co2 and ferts are not nesisary but you get way more colors and growth with co2 and ferts.

 

that's pretty typical of what I have read and use myself. Any other secret tips you would be willing to share?

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Having good flow is very important to growing buce, it keep algae from growing on the leaves and i personally believe the grow faster in a strong flow... If you want to grow allot of buce divide the plant often even if you make it look kinda ugly, it will grow back.

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  • 5 weeks later...

What do you find is the best way to cut buces? Cutting off the growing tips or dividing the rhizomes?

Either way is fine. Once cut, thats where a new plant will starts to grow.

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I just waite until it grows 4-5 new leave and cut the rhizome leaving 4-5 leave on the old plant so it can re-grow.. Then you turn 1 plant into 2

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I currently have

Brownie ghost

Brownie jade

Brownie Helena

Black centipede

Kedagang red

Lamundu mini blue

Lamundu mini purple

Pink biblis (from two sources so will compare once settled and all submerged growth)

Titan 1

And we got three with no Id. So we have labeled them neo 1, neo 2 and neo 3. At least until we get submerged growth and may have a chance of correct id.

Edited by lodo
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Since this photo we have added a large clump of tissue cultured lamundu mini purple, and small-medium pink biblis also tissue cultured

249da37bc8cf48b55e33e0e933af0475.jpg

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Last one is "black centipede"

Leaves are darker in person, but not black.

Hope as higher up buce grows the darkness really sets in.

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I bought it as black centipede but a lot of mine I question the id of them.

Do you have a photo of yours?

As said leaves are darker than picture makes out. Only had it short term, and only one new leaf. have have been emersed prior. Will wait and see how it progresses

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i always just type out the codes, it cant tell you its too big then hahaha [img.] insert image from picture host here.jpg [/img.] do that with out the full stops in the square brackets and bam pics haha

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I bought it as black centipede but a lot of mine I question the id of them.

Do you have a photo of yours?

As said leaves are darker than picture makes out. Only had it short term, and only one new leaf. have have been emersed prior. Will wait and see how it progresses

I've found swapping from emersed to submersed or vice versa always affects the colour of the leaves of my buce.

Its hard to be sure on the ID of most buce. A lot of variants seem to look very similar, but have vastly different names. Hopefully the science will catch up soon and we'll be able to work out what species we actually have. My guess is there will be far fewer species than the number of trade names in the hobby.

Edited by fishmosy
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Hi guys, the reason people in love with buces not because of their emersed form. It is because of their submerged leaves colour :)

Also all the emersed leaves will melt in matter of time for sure.

One of my submerged growing up nicely. (Along with green emersed leaves) - big diffirent

http://instagram.com/p/xnpIHQpsmb/

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