Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
sushant

whats wrong with this shrimp?

Recommended Posts

sushant

Today i have notice that one of my rilli shrimp with was showing translucent body which looks far from normal. i have lost quite a few shrimps to this disease before and attribute this to planaria infestation(saw a group of them actually attacking an adult shrimp and killing it).

But this time the tank is planaria free and i guess i was wrong at the first place and there must be something else behind this. please have a look at the pictures and suggest me the probable cause and remedies for the same. Thanks in advance.

post-548-0-46449100-1411927924_thumb.jpgpost-548-0-89854000-1411927927_thumb.jpgpost-548-0-64634100-1411927931_thumb.jpg

Edited by sushant

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smicko

Have a look at the shrimp disease and diagnosis sticky, you should be able to find it there.

Cheers mick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc

Sushant,

 

that looks like the condition called Muscular Necrosis. 

It's in the shrimp disease and diagnosis sticky thread.

But what causes it is still undetermined yet. It could be an infection, or it could be caused by poor water conditions.

 

First thing to do is to remove and separate it from the rest of the shrimp. This will ease treatment, and avoid further infecting the other shrimps. Put it into a separate container, with some tank water, then slowly drip in clean (conditioned) water over the next few hours.

Would be even better if you can get your hands on RO water or Distilled water. 

 

Add some blackwater extract if you have any. And a couple of IAL leaves.

Add some blackwater extract to the main tank as well. It won't hurt.

 

While that is up and running, test your water and report back with your water parameters.

Edited by jayc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fishmosy

Agree with jayc, symptoms are very typical of muscle necrosis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc

Sushant,

 

I should have stressed the urgency more.

 

You need to act FAST!

 

That shrimp is already very advanced in it's illness.

It might already be too late. But you can try separating it and giving it clean water with the correct parameters for a Rilli/Cherry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Odin

I found one of my cherries like this a few weeks ago but couldn't find anything out about it until I read this post.. Have since removed the shrimp with the same symptoms :(

Here's a study of the Illness,

https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.abpv.vet.br/upload/documentos/DOWNLOAD-FULL-ARTICLE-7-20881_2012_3_30_15_3.pdf&sa=U&ei=BvksVOuQHsvdaMXugNAO&ved=0CA0QFjAB&usg=AFQjCNG7c91tKFZvPSsKXqaKHbUc8DPJLg

It's a pdf.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc

Thanks for the link to the article. 

I read it.

 

It's essentially an article to prove that muscle necrosis could be consistently reproduced and, confirming that the disease has an infectious etiology.

They succeeded in this trial. Which means they could reproduce the disease, and confirm it is infectious.

 

There is nothing in this paper to suggest there is a cure.

 

The paper however, does mention that there is a non-inflammatory and an inflammatory versions of Muscular Necrosis.

The non-inflammatory condition possibly caused by environmental changes such as sudden changes in temperature, salinity or dissolved oxygen.

The inflammatory condition being caused by a pathogen (bacterial or viral).

 

Although they did not see any casualties in their short 4-5 week study, this is quite different in the shrimp farms where casualties are seen. And certainly different to the dwarf shrimps we keep. Being smaller then commercially farmed shrimps, the dwarf shrimps will see casualties in a shorter timespan.

 

Unfortunately, this article adds nothing to what we already know.

There is no cure yet. When the issue is visible, it is already usually too advanced for a full recovery. Not impossible, but certainly difficult.

Isolate the infected shrimp, and correct any environmental issues like temperature, water parameters, and oxygen levels - this still remains as the only possible action.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc

ps.

 

Even if your shrimps are healthy, it pays to read the Shrimp Disease and Diagnosis sticky. 

So you recognise issues if and when they do arise.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Must Read SKF Articles

  • Join Our Community!

    Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

  • Posts

    • sdlTBfanUK
      If you can get one of these where you are it is probably the best all round for quietness and sufficient 'as it is' for your quarantine tank, there is a great video attached, you probably won't want the air line if you want quietness though! If you watch the video you may find you can replace the supplied sponge with an already used bacteria full sponge if you have one available, otherwise if you put the supplied new  sponge in an existing tank for a couple of weeks (just float it in the tank) to get bacteria into it? This will slightly delay getting the fish, assuming you haven't already got them........ You may be able to get one of these on your local ebay or amazon? https://www.pro-shrimp.co.uk/internal-filters/2104-aquael-pat-mini-filter-5905546137997.html Simon  
    • Zoidburg
      Sponge filters can be noisy if not set up properly.... one method of quieting some (depending on style) is to put an air stone at the base of the sponge filter, making smaller bubbles. Another method is to have the 'out-take' of the sponge filter just above the waters surface. It still makes noise, it's just quieter.   In the bird world, a minimum of 30 days is recommended for quarantine (which is hard for most people to do effectively), although up to 90 days can also be recommended. I know that one shrimp supplier does 30 day quarantine for new imported shrimp. I don't know if there's a standard set in the fish world.... but I have both quarantined fish and not quarantined fish. The fish I quarantined I struggled to keep alive, but not quarantining them didn't guarantee survival either... I only have shrimp tanks now, although I did add fish to one of those tanks, without quarantine. No other fish in there so no 'real' reason to quarantine, even though I did source the fish from two separate locations (just because first option only had 2 and they do better in groups). I *think* they are doing fine, but they are a species known for hiding and don't usually all come out at once so hard to say for sure.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry to hear you have lost a shrimp. How many are there left in the tank? I wouldn't act to hastily and start treating for something that may not be? Maybe it just died and you will never know why if it had no symptoms? Just keep a close eye on the rest for now! Maybe the BKK weren't very healthy to start with if they hadn't grown as expected, though also there may not have been sufficient food, but that is less likely if the others in the tank have grown! I would feed the shrimps as the grazing area is fairly limited (I assume this is your 80L divided into 4) but sparingly, maybe twice a week. Crush up a pellet into almost a powder, then dip a pin or similar a couple of mm in the water, then into the food, then back in to the tank will give them something different to eat to supplement their diet. I would check the temperature of the water as well as when my old setup overheated they started going an orange/pink colour? It is good that you obviously spend time watching them as they are fascinating to watch and very calming!  Simon
    • Crabby
      Perfect. I've got a spare heater, can source a tank and filtration, have cycled media, and have a simple light if ambient light isn't enough.  Pretty random question - are sponge filters super noisy? I've never used one with an air pump, and the qt tank would go in my bedroom; but only if I could actually sleep 🙂. Otherwise, is it cool to turn off a filter at night? Cheers
    • jayc
      Usually a week or two should be enough with careful observation to see if any symptoms develop.   No. But it depends on the filtration. If you use a mature filter, then you don't need to cycle a quarantine tank for very long. I just use the water from my water change to fill a quarantine tank. And some old filter media floss from a mature filter in the quarantine tank's canister. The quarantine tank is very basic, no decor, no substrate, nothing. Except maybe some lights to check for diseases after a week or two. You can get away with lights, and use a hand held torch even.  Just a heater.
×
×
  • Create New...