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morningdewdrops

seed shrimp

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morningdewdrops

Hi guys! New to this forum, but have been shrimping for about a year noe . abouI i

I have heaps of seed shrimp! And I know they are harmless to the shrimp, but they really give me the jitters jitters!

Is there any ways that I can get rid of them or at least lower the numbers? Thanks heaps!heaps

Nessa

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BlueBolts

I tend to get seed shrimps when I over feed....just reduce the feeding and/or use a feeding tray, and they'll slowly disappear.... They're prove of good water quality too..

Edited by BlueBolts

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Squiggle

I'm a big fan of seed shrimp, they are like the canary in your tank, I start to worry when they start to disappear. :thumbsu:

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morningdewdrops

Cool. I guess it's a good sign. But they sure are creepy characters. I've tried not feeding the shrimp and they're still around. The shrimp end up eating plants instead.. Guess I just have to live with them. But if anyone has any ideas, please let me know!! Thanks guys!

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Garnelchen

Well, if you really want to get rid of them that's easily solved.(as long as there are no little shrimplets in your tank at the time) :smile:

 

Just put a few small fish like endlers in the tank for a couple of days...the fish will eat all the seed shrimp but will not harm your adult shrimp.

But, yeah, as I said, if there are shrimplets around they might get eaten too.

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morningdewdrops

Haha thanks. If I can find anyone who's willing to lend me some endlers. Haha ;)

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FishBeast

Seed shrimp hey... LOL I had no clue as to what they are... I call them Sea Fleas  :thumbsu:

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yeswaitnosorry

 "Sea Fleas"  love it. :lol:

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