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New Library Article - How to - Turn a cheap net into one that functions like an expensive net.


newbreed
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IMG_7437Medium_zps7012736c.jpg

What makes a good shrimp net?

It can be materials, price, function, does it catch shrimp successfully?

I've used had many shrimp nets, and the best ones, that actually catch shrimp easily, are the ones whose net stays open and forms a little cup that does not scare the shrimp into swimming the other way when you try to catch them. Because it is not obstructed and looks like an escape route, the shrimp just seem to swim right in.

3D-net_zps90ab3d55.jpg

Unlike soft, floppy nets, that look like a barrier. These nets don't have enough stiffness to keep the net open.

IMG_7432Medium_zpsd7564bf6.jpg

The solution?

A cable tie cut into the appropriate length to keep the net open.

IMG_7433Medium_zps08014c3e.jpg

Carefully place it into the net like so ...

IMG_7437Medium_zps7012736c.jpg

IMG_7435Medium_zpsb2ce08d4.jpg

IMG_7436Medium_zps6f11ae2c.jpg

There you have it.

A $2 net that will now catch shrimp like the $30 one I have.

Jayc.


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Awesome stuff, can't wait to read the articles that get written! Come on people, gotta be in it to win it! :D

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Can we submit an old "how to" article that has never been entered jn a comp or it has to be new?

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I don't see an issue so long as it works within the rules of the competition.

Just have another read through these just to be sure.

Remember the main idea is to get new content into the library.

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Can I submit an article I posted previously?

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If your article is already listed in the Library or has been entered in previous Library competition, then I would say no.

 

Otherwise, if it meets the criteria set out in the rules, then please submit it.

 

Looking forward to reading these articles. :thumbsu:

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If your article is already listed in the Library or has been entered in previous Library competition, then I would say no.

 

Otherwise, if it meets the criteria set out in the rules, then please submit it.

 

Looking forward to reading these articles. :thumbsu:

 

Ok gotcha.

They aren't library articles.

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Hmmm, no entries as yet?

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I'll start off with a small simple "How to"

 

How to - Turn a cheap net into one that functions like an expensive net.

 

What makes a good shrimp net?

It can be materials, price, function, does it catch shrimp successfully?

 

I've used had many shrimp nets, and the best ones, that actually catch shrimp easily, are the ones whose net stays open and forms a little cup that does not scare the shrimp into swimming the other way when you try to catch them. Because it is not obstructed and looks like an escape route, the shrimp just seem to swim right in.

 

3D-net_zps90ab3d55.jpg

 

Unlike soft, floppy nets, that look like a barrier. These nets don't have enough stiffness to keep the net open.

 

IMG_7432Medium_zpsd7564bf6.jpg

 

 

The solution?

A cable tie cut into the appropriate length to keep the net open.

 

IMG_7433Medium_zps08014c3e.jpg

 

Carefully place it into the net like so ...

 

IMG_7437Medium_zps7012736c.jpg

 

IMG_7435Medium_zpsb2ce08d4.jpg

 

IMG_7436Medium_zps6f11ae2c.jpg

 

There you have it.

A $2 net that will now catch shrimp like the $30 one I have.

 

Jayc.



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Brilliant Jayc! Great concept mate!

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Thanks Squiggle and Newbreed.

I actually use it more than the round expensive net.

Round shaped nets aren't as effective. Whereas a square shape really fits right into the corners of a tank. With a round net in a square tank, there are still gaps for the buggers to escape!

 

It's such a simple and effective and CHEAP DIY product. I should copyright it's design.

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Submitting an article I wrote a while ago. You might have already read it, but it's one I think would be good library material.

It's an article about edible flowers for shrimps.

 

Article - Edible Flowers for Shrimps

 

We have been discussed and talked about feeding shrimp leaves and fruits on many occasions. And the results are quite well documented in the use of leaves like Mulberry, Oak, Indian Almond (Kattapa), etc.
However, the idea of feeding shrimp flowers is still very new. After all in the wild, things like leaves, twigs, branches AND flowers all drop into rivers where native shrimps will use a food source.

In terms of nutritional value, you will find nutrients and minerals in flowers that are lacking in leaves (and vice versa).
I'll expand on one of the main benefits of a nutrient found in flowers that aren't present in leaves a bit later.

HOWEVER, NOT ALL FLOWERS ARE SAFE FOR EATING.

 

So we will start with those flowers that are known to be edible.
Of course that are literally hundreds of varieties of edible flowers. We all know about cauliflower and broccoli, those are some common flowers we eat regularly.

My experiment is limited to what I could source close by.
The flowers I tested on my shrimp include Rose, Nasturtium, Dandelion, Chrysanthemum and Pansies.
Caveat: I KNOW for sure that these flowers in my backyard have not been sprayed with anything else apart from tap water and rain. No pesticides, fertilisers. If in doubt, DON'T use it.

You could try other flowers that are easily sourced in your garden.
But please note - I have limited my research and experiments to flowers only. Not the leaves of these flowers. As a cautionary warning, some leaves are sappy and oily, and might not be too safe to feed your shrimp. So I take no responsibility with the leaves of these flowers. Although, Ineke has fed Nasturtium leaves to her shrimp which they seem to like and was safe as mentioned in another thread.

 

Preparation:
1) Pick fresh looking flowers with no visible damage. Select flowers that you KNOW have no previous pesticides or fertilisers, and don't grow down stream from sources of water that might be contaminated.
2) Gently wash them (flowers are very delicate and soft) if there is dirt on them. 
3) Remove as much of the base of the flower (the stem, receptacle and sepal). Usually only the petals are what we want.
post-3460-139909864172_thumb.jpg

4a) Place into tank fresh. (Recommended)
4b) Or Blanch it for 1-2 minutes in hot boiling water. Remember, flowers are soft, they don't need to be blanched for much longer. (not a necessary step).
4c) Freezing or Drying. While it's possible to freeze or dry flowers for storage and feeding at a later date, I'm not sure what nutrients will be lost.

5) Ensure any decayed leftovers are removed if left uneaten after a few days.

 

Review of the flowers:
I have searched high and low in the scientific literature for quantitative data on the nutrient content of flower petals. There are relatively few references, particularly in English.

Most of the literature is focused on evaluating flowers for their sensory characteristics, such as appeal, size, shape, colour, taste, and above all, aroma, which is important for the cosmetic and perfume industry.

Available data on a number of edible flowers show that petals also contain an array of vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamins A and C, various B vitamins, folic acid, and minerals including calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron and phosphorus.

Apart from the nutritional value of flowers with the abundance of vitamins and minerals, flowers also contain a huge amounts of carotenoids and flavonoids compared to leaves. Specifically, Crytoxanthin, Zeaxanthin and Lutein which is obviously lacking in the leaves. Just look at the pretty colours of flowers.

Zeaxanthin and Lutein has been known as a natural source of colour enhancement in fish (and maybe shrimp). These carotenoids are regularly added to fish food from sources like spirulina. Zeaxanthin enhances the Reds and Oranges while Lutein enhances Yellows.

Flowers are also high in antioxidants, they are antiseptic, antifungal and anti-inflammatory. This sounds too good to be true. It's like feeding medicine to your shrimps to fight viruses and bacteria.

 

 

On to the review of specific flowers.

Dandelions:

post-3460-139909864174_thumb.jpg
Say what?! That's a weed!
It sure is, and I have heaps growing in my front garden. Now I have a use for them.
Dandelion is a perennial plant with jagged, bright green leaves to 30cm long, a hollow flower stem to 30cm and one terminal yellow daisy. Has been subject of many studies investigating it's ability to even fight cancer!

Dandelions, contain numerous flavonoids and carotenoids with antioxidant properties, including four times the beta carotene of broccoli, as well as lutein, cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin. They are also a rich source of vitamins, including folic acid, riboflavin, pyroxidine, niacin, and vitamins A, B, C and D. Minerals including iron, potassium and zinc.

The rich yellow colour of dandelion flowers comes from beta-carotene - Lutein specifically.

Side note: the leaves are apparently also really high in Calcium (187mg per 100g), rivalling Mulberry leaves. But I have not tried feeding Dandelion leaves, nor do I know if they are safe. But people eat them. The Chinese, European and Native American have been using the dandelion plant for centuries to treat digestive, kidney and liver ailments.

I fed my shrimp a fresh dandelion as one experiment. The first day in the tank, the shrimp investigated it, but didn't seem to be eating. It wasn't till the 3 day that I noticed them actually munching on the flower. The petals probably needed to soften first.

The second experiment was with a blanched dandelion. This time the shrimp took to it the same day. And average sized flower was consumed within 3-4 days in my tank.

Verdict: Big tick. They loved it. Too early to tell if there is any impact on colouration of the shrimps.

 

 

Nasturtiums:
post-3460-13990986417_thumb.jpg
Nasturtium is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 1 m (3ft 3in). It is part of the Watercress family. The most common variety is Tropaeolum majus. The peppery flowers are good in salads and pasta dishes.
A 2009 study by the Universidad Nacional de Colombia identified the group of phenols or phenolic compounds in the pigments of orange and red flowers of Tropaeolum majus as anthocyanins. Anthocyanins, which are abundant in blueberries and red cabbage, help naturalize the damaging effects of free radicals, thereby helping to protect us from chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Anthocyanins are anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer and antioxidant.

Nasturtiums are high in Vitamin C, about 45 milligrams vitamin C per 100 grams, and also contain Vitamin A and flavonoids anti-oxidants like ß carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin.
They also contain Minerals like Iron, Calcium.

Nasturtiums might not pack as much nutritional value as dandelions, but it sounds great to feed shrimp occasionally, to combat diseases due to it's antibiotic, antiseptic, and antifungal properties.

I fed Nasturtium flowers to my shrimp in a similar fashion to Dandelions. Fresh and Blanched.
The shrimp had very similar reactions. They ate it when the flowers were soft.

Verdict: Another big tick. They loved it. Too early to tell if there is any impact on colouration of the shrimps. I do have one shrimp that looks unwell. I'm keeping an eye to it to see if there are any improvements.

I won't go into detailed reviews on the Rose, Pansies or Chrysanthemum flowers, as I couldn't find much information on it's nutritional value. But the results are very similar.

There are dozens of other edible flowers that could be introduced to your shrimp as long as you take the necessary precautions on where you collect these flowers.

Some other possibilities include:
Daisies, Sunflowers, Daylilies, Violets, Tulips.

 

 

 

Just a word of caution for anyone trying.

Please stick to flowers we know are edible. If in doubt check this list.
http://www.westcoast...edible-flowers/

 

 

Many flowers have antiseptic, antibacterial and antifungal qualities.
If you have suspected recent bacterial issues with your shrimps lately, try feeding flowers and report back on your findings.
These are some, and by no means the only, flowers that exhibit antiseptic, antibacterial and antifungal qualities:-
Basil flowers, Bee Balm (Bergamot) flowers, Borage flowers, Echinacea flowers, Pot Marigold flowers, Chamomile flowers, Chrysanthemums flowers, Garlic flowers, Nasturtiums flowers, Onion flowers, Oregano flowers, Pansy flowers and Violet flowers.

Please note - I am talking about the flowers here. So when you see Basil for example, that's the Basil flowers, not the leaves. Even-though the Basil leaves are edible, I cannot vouch for the leaves from some of these other flowers.

 

If nothing else, this is another nutritious, natural food source for shrimps.

My shrimps have shown to love eating flowers, and usually devour them within 1-2 days after placing in the tank.
Hold the flowers down the same way you'd hold mulberry leaves or other plant foods down.

 

While we are at it, it's probably best to name some flowers to AVOID, as these are considered poisonous.
Primulas, Primroses, Polyanthus, Iris, Daffodils, Nghtshade, box wood, foxgloves, amaryllis, clematis, bryony, buttercups, begonia, columbine, lily of the valley, sweet pea, Brachycome, Nolana, Rudbeckia, periwinkle, oleander, dogbane, aconite.

Edited by jayc
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Very cool dude, loved this article when you first wrote it & it's just as informative still, loved rereading it! :thumbsu:

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Great write ups jayc, now you need some competition.

Cmon peeps get the entries in.

Cheers mick

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Have posted in another thread

http://www.naturkund...brecht_1999.pdf

Atlas of Living Australia – shows the collection points of Thiara amarula in Australia.

http://bie.ala.org.a...e-f394430ec676#

Edited by fishmosy, Today, 01:59 PM.

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Every time Ben writes an article I find myself wanting something new.

Great write up and thanks for opening my eyes to more natives.

Cheers mick

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OzShrimps Guide to transporting and increasing survivability of shrimp for extended periods of time.

I utilised this method when moving house last January. I have given this as advice on the forum previously a long time ago but not written as an article. Unfortunately i didnt take photos because i was moving house but i have obtained images of the main items required and done an image in paint to explain the holes. i hope this will suffice?.

 

 

You will require –

·         20 litre bucket with lid (Source from bunnings or masters) 534e66ac-23de-4d10-b643-6da5ba766deb_zps

 

·         Sponge filter I recommend the ones which have suction caps and a minimum of two if you go for single sponge. Optimum at least 2 dual sponge filters  spongefilters_zps436a9315.jpg

·         Battery operated air pump.  c26d9a42-e990-46c6-b4ef-4a438be19cb1_zps

·         Air hose

·         Drill or sharp pointed object.

·         Excess plants (the more the better) 7efa77a0-b44d-46c4-8d0d-86a9f1660080_zps

·         Ph buffering substrate.

 

Preparation –

 

Step  1: Ensure your sponge filters are running on your existing tank for as long as possible to ensure you have beneficial bacteria culture growing on the filters. The longer they are running the better.

 

Step 2: Take the lid from your bucket and make holes in the lid. The holes should be big enough for your air hose to fit through one of the holes and I did the extras to ensure new air was able to enter the bucket. Mine was done in a similar pattern to this

 lidholes_zps80a6375b.jpg

 

Step 3: Add existent tank water to the bucket. I would recommend at least 3 quarters full as if you are unfortunate enough to suffer an ammonia spike etc (worst case) the more water the lower the impact in theory. Be mindful of how much you add due to holes in the lid, the more the water the more chance of spillage.

 

Step 4: Add some of your existing substrate to the bottom of the bucket. I used benibachi for the ph buffering ability which had already been in my tank. I felt it would assist in reducing stress due to resembling the tank.

 

Step 5: You want to add the sponge filters to the inside of the bucket and thread your air hose through the holes in the lid.

 

Step 6: Add any plants you have available to your bucket. The aim of the plants is to assist the bacteria on the sponge filters in maintaining healthy water due to the small amount. I utilised needle leaf java fern and it also provides a food source for the shrimp.

 

Step 7: Add your shrimp and turn on the sponge filters and replace the lid on the bucket.

 

Step 8: Store the bucket out of direct sunlight during travel and storage at arriving destination to prevent major fluctuations in water temperature.

 

I had approximately 5 CBS inclusive of shrimplets in a bucket utilising this method alive for close to two weeks. They survived 8 hour car trip and then about 12 days whilst my tank cycled being set up in the new house with temperatures averaging over 35 degrees a day.

 

TIPS: Prepare your sponge filters in the tank and have them running for as long as possible prior to transfer.

The later you leave your shrimp to be added to the bucket the better.

Keep your bucket out of direct sunlight to avoid over heating and mass fluctuations in water temperature.

Avoid over feeding your shrimp as you dont want an ammonia spike from left over food. Depending on amount of plants these should be sufficient to supply micro organisms to feed on the leaves.

Battery air pumps are also able to be used in a black out so dont throw them away.

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Nice article dude, well done! :thumbsu:

Thanks :) i am actually also using this setup to store my shrimp when i switch over to r/o Water

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I would like to enter this as it has not been put in the library or entered in any comp yet...

 

DIY SHRIMP SAFE FILTER GUARD

 

These can be made to fit any size tubing at the fraction of the cost of what is sold and is so very easy to make. So lets get started!

Note: It is recommended that you use protective goggles and gloves, as frayed mesh wires can get pretty sharp.

Here is what you will need to make the filter guard:

*Stainless Steel Mesh sheet hole size #30 (can be purchased at the mesh company online, I got the A3 size sheet which is enough for a lot of guards!)
*Tin snips
*Heat Shrink (depending on the size of your tube get the heat shrink at least 5mm bigger, can be purchased eBay)
*Heat source (Lighter, hair dryer, heat gun, etc)
*A tube of the size required
*Pencil, marker
*Ruler
*Cable ties
*Craft knife

 

IMAG0165-1.jpg

Steps

Prepare cable ties as you will need both hands free
IMAG0167.jpg

Cut mesh sheet to size depending on how long you want the guard and how thin the tube is (I cut mine 10cmx10cm) and wrap tightly around the tube, secure tightly with cable ties
IMAG0168.jpg

Cut another piece of mesh depending on the width of the mesh wrapped around tube (mine was 18mm), cut a square piece (18x18mm), place on end of mesh and bend corners over
IMAG0174.jpg

Cut a bit of heat shrink (mine was 2cm) and place over the mesh making sure the piece of mesh covering the end stays in place, leave about 0.5cm above.
IMAG0175-1.jpg

Using the heat source you are using (I just used a lighter) and heat the heat shrink until it shrinks tightly around the mesh (make sure you don't heat the same place for too long as it will melt! Just quickly run the flame over the shrink) and then quickly push the end down on a flat surface for a minute.
IMAG0177-1.jpg

The outcome should be something like this (you can use the craft knife to make the opening bigger if you wish)
IMAG0178.jpg

Now for the other end, repeat the steps above but shove the tube in instead. Leave for a minute or so.
IMAG0173.jpg

Remove the tube and cut the cable ties, cut a thin bit of heat shrink to place in middle of guard for extra support, heat it until tight. And there you have it, your DIY filter guard.
IMAG0179-1.jpg

For a fraction of the cost you can make all the filter guards needed, can be HOB, canister, overflow pipe, etc. for your 20 shrimp tanks!:encouragement:

Cheers Chi.

Edited by CNgo2006
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And my other entry

 

DIY SHRIMP CAVES

 

Pretty sure everyone knows how to silicone rings together so won't be a step by step tutorial

What was used was:

* Aquarium safe silicone or superglue
* Ceramic rings (choose an inert one and one that has a nice hole size for the specific shrimp you are making it for) I chose Mr Aqua M size. It is inert and quite porous for extra surface area (never a bad thing). You may want to look at getting the L size if you are making for large adult shrimp.
* Stick like a shish kebab stick to clear any obstructions that the silicone may have caused on the inside of the rings.

They look quite nice I reckon, with moss on them will look even better!
IMAG0844.jpg

For around $15 you can easily make 10+ pyramids, go crazy and make them as big/small as you want, giant levelled pyramids or single logs, up to you!
IMAG0845.jpg

in this hobby we like to save where possible, so making these are a great way to save.


Cheers Chi.

Edited by CNgo2006
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      Major issue that needs to be addressed 
       
      Since my first sales of A. lacustris I suddenly saw a spike of ads for them in Australia, unfortunately I could tell the individuals for sale were all wild caught and at best had only lived in an aquarium for a couple weeks of their life. This then would result in people encouraging the decimation and local extinction of the species in our waterways due to peoples greed of wanting to make a quick buck off this amazing native species. The crabs that I breed and sell are all aquarium raised individuals ONLY, I have put time, money and effort into the crabs I breed to ensure I do not impact the wild populations and offer aquarium suited specimens for people wanting to keep them. I have had a plethora of emails from people asking me why crabs they had sourced outside of my individuals had suddenly died off, this is simply due to the fact these crabs have not been aquarium raised and selectively bred for years like mine have. I find it horrendous that people think it is okay to collect many wild individuals to then sell knowing full well they will die within around a 3 month period just for their sake to make some 'fast' money. So please before you buy from a seller of these crabs ask as many questions as you can to find out how many generations old your crabs are and how long they've been bred for etc. If they cannot supply a high amount of detail or simply quote my articles about them do not buy from that seller. Do not support poachers for your aquarium! This applies with all species, worldwide.
       
      Thank you for reading my article,
      again if you have any questions feel free to email me as I'm always happy to help out ethical keepers and potential breeders of this species.
       
      Author and credits: Hervey Doerr-Rolley

      View full article
    • Rare Aqua
      By Rare Aqua
      The in depth guide to keeping as well as breeding Amarinus lacustris by Hervey Doerr-Rolley
       
      Overview
      The aim of this article is to educate and warn people of the mistakes I made and how I was successful with breeding and keeping this species. I published an article about this species several years ago so thought it was time for an updated guide for anyone wanting to keep and breed this species. All my knowledge about this species has been developed over the 4 years I've kept this species as well as the many scientific articles I've studied, I first kept this species when I was 15 and now 19, my colony is still going strongly. Currently studying a bachelor of Marine science. Firstly I'd like to point out this species does not have a larval cycle, it is a far too common misconception people have. I believe this thought is derived from their much larger cousin the Amarinus laevis and the Thai micro crab, Limnopilos naiyanetri. Amarinus lacustris have fully formed offspring, meaning their offspring are essentially miniature adults once hatched from their egg. Some points of interest about this species, there are 8 instars before their pubertal moult. Females up to two moults before their pubertal moult can copulate and store spermatozoon, once she reaches the pubertal moult she can then impregnate herself without the need of copulation. The stored spermatozoon can then be used up to 15 separate brood cycles (15 clutches of eggs). Adult females can carry up to *35 eggs (anecdotal) and take around 25-30 days at 15 degrees Celsius to hatch as fully formed offspring. 
       
      Water chemistry
      A. lacustris have a strong preference for hard water, I keep and breed mine in;
      pH: 8-8.2
      Ammonia:0ppm
      Nitrate:0ppm
      Nitrite:0ppm
      KH:125ppm 
      *25% water changes are done weekly*
       
      Breeding and Husbandry 
      Key points for their care;
      Gravel substrate - fine pea gravel is best.
      Air pump sponge filters are essential as this provides cleaner water as well as a feeding ground for the offspring as well as adults.
      Mulm and moss are essential.
      A good rule of thumb from my experience is 500ml of aquarium space per baby-sub adult, and then 1L per adult crab, this allows for less aggression from male to male behavior. It is up to you but the less stocking density the better due to the aggression of breeding from males, keep in mind this aggression is only towards other males however females that are being copulated with may sustain serious injuries if too many males are kept together. The best ratios are two males to 8 females. When a female sheds she releases hormones into the water column just like shrimp, if any of you are familiar with breeding shrimp you can note this by the erratic and fast speeds the males zoom around the aquarium searching for the female, this is the same case with A. lacustris except the swimming, rather they crawl quickly around the aquarium in search for the female to copulate with. Once the male finds the female he will grasp the female tightly underside to underside in a 'hug' embrace, he will then fertilize the female. This embrace can last minutes or hours depending on the male. Eggs will soon become visible and as described above hatch within 25-30 days*. This species is a cold water crustacean so you must remember that, breeding will cease if the temperature goes above 22 Celsius. Keep them in a mature mulm filled aquarium with leaf litter (I use oak leaves) with plenty of hiding spots and moss, a 8pH and 15 Celsius and before you know it you will have berried females.
       
      Feeding
       
      Surprisingly my A. lacustris do not eat commercial foods, I feed mine cultured white worms which are perfect as they grow to a max size of 3cm and survive underwater for several days. I also add snails to my aquarium as the crabs feed on their feces. Funnily enough baby crabs will eat the white worms too once they are 2 instars old, so it is not uncommon to see a 2mm baby crab hanging on to a 2cm long white worm! I feed my crabs every 3 days and small amounts of the worms to reduce water quality issues.
       
      Common questions I am asked 
       
      As I was the first person in Australia and the world to raise fully tank raised F2 offspring i have come across many commonly asked questions. "can I get these crabs in country x?" so far you can legally only get these crabs in their native geographical regions, however once these crabs are even more commonly bred their popularity over the Thai micro crab will be clearly abundant simply due to their ease of breeding which you know, therefore I wouldn't be surprised if these hit the international market once they're being large scale bred. "Do you have any for sale?" when I have crabs for sale I have a waiting list, If you want to ask questions or be on the waiting list email me: [email protected] "can these go with fish x?" if the fish is 4cm or less they are fine generally, my opinion is keep the species only or with shrimp which leads to the next question "are the shrimp safe" and yes they are, however they are naturally scavengers so if you have dead or sick shrimp they will eat them, if your shrimp are healthy they will not predate on them. "how long do they live for?" they live for around 2-3 years+. "why are all my crabs dying" this question is addressed below; 
       
      Major issue that needs to be addressed 
       
      Since my first sales of A. lacustris I suddenly saw a spike of ads for them in Australia, unfortunately I could tell the individuals for sale were all wild caught and at best had only lived in an aquarium for a couple weeks of their life. This then would result in people encouraging the decimation and local extinction of the species in our waterways due to peoples greed of wanting to make a quick buck off this amazing native species. The crabs that I breed and sell are all aquarium raised individuals ONLY, I have put time, money and effort into the crabs I breed to ensure I do not impact the wild populations and offer aquarium suited specimens for people wanting to keep them. I have had a plethora of emails from people asking me why crabs they had sourced outside of my individuals had suddenly died off, this is simply due to the fact these crabs have not been aquarium raised and selectively bred for years like mine have. I find it horrendous that people think it is okay to collect many wild individuals to then sell knowing full well they will die within around a 3 month period just for their sake to make some 'fast' money. So please before you buy from a seller of these crabs ask as many questions as you can to find out how many generations old your crabs are and how long they've been bred for etc. If they cannot supply a high amount of detail or simply quote my articles about them do not buy from that seller. Do not support poachers for your aquarium! This applies with all species, worldwide.
       
      Thank you for reading my article,
      again if you have any questions feel free to email me as I'm always happy to help out ethical keepers and potential breeders of this species.
       
      Author and credits: Hervey Doerr-Rolley
    • Adam Bomb
      By Adam Bomb
      Hello everyone! 
      My area of Michigan (48065) seems to be a black hole for shrimp enthusiasts, and my hope was to uncover folks I can buy shrimp (and hopefully moss) from locally. Since the pandemic has paused all face-to-face meetings for local clubs until further notice, it's been rough (and I can't imagine paying online retail ridiculous prices for shipped shrimp)!
      Since we only have the "City" field (for location) on profiles, is there a better way to find local people? I'd love any help you can offer. 
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    • beanbag
      yes, it's the shed shells. now that I think about it, I also remember in the video the bugs were clear, and I have seen clear ones before too, a long time ago.  But these recent ones were dark colored. So I have two tanks.  In one of them, where I normally have this problem, I have been dosing antibiotics.  The short version is that most of the shadow panda and RWP shrimp have got this disease, but they haven't died either.  But they don't recover either.  They just simply stop growing and stay at a small size with stumpy short antenna.  The first shadow panda that got this problem is still alive maybe 2-3 months later. In my other tank which often doesn't have this problem also got it, but it seems to have hit harder, where both "almost adult" shadow panda suddenly got it and died within a few days.  Antibiotics didn't save them.  It's too weird - it seems like this problem comes on suddenly, with no trigger that I can think of.  (besides "the weather was warm and I ran the air conditioned".  This doesn't actually affect the water temperatures since I have a chiller, but maybe something blew into the tank?)
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry for the delay, I have been searching on here and the wider web but cannot find what you are referring too! I do know which video you are talking about and remember seeing it. The video was of a shed shell rather than a live shrimp! Are you seeing them on live shrimp? From memory I don't think it was anything to worry about and I very much doubt it would discriminate between different colours of shrimp, but was probably nothing to worry about and just part of the life in aquariums, like detritus worms and other life forms. I think they were colourless in the video, if my memory is any good? Are you still getting shadow panda deaths?
    • beanbag
      Hello folks, I remember reading about this a few years ago but for the life of me cannot find this info / thread again. Can somebody point me to a link for this info? I forgot the forum I saw it on. There was a discussion about how if you look at a shrimp molt shell under a microscope or loupe, sometimes you can see tiny "bugs" or whatever moving around inside. At that time, I think the conclusion was that maybe it was a symbiotic relationship because it even happened with healthy shrimp. But I can't remember if this occurred only in neocaridina or caridina also? I just happened to look at a shadow panda's (caridina) shell who is sick with the "shortened antenna disease" that I always complained about. There were tiny blue/black spots moving around inside.  I also looked at the molt shells of some blue bolts that don't have this problem, and there were very few, or none, spots moving around inside the molt shell. I wonder if this could be some symbiotic relationship gone wrong and is the actual (proximate) cause of the problem.  (Since antibiotics didn't really seem to work) In that case, I would need some kind of anti-parasite medication to cure the shrimps.  What are the typical internal anti-parasite medications for shrimps?
    • sdlTBfanUK
      You may end up losing this batch entirely but then you can start completely fresh and get the aquarium set up right for the next batch of shrimp! If you do any large water changes then try and add the new water slowly, either dripper or some other way. You should get yourself a TDS meter (as JayC above), they are cheap and readily available. You should always use a GH tester kit as well with shrimps, if you do the 50% water change that should halve the GH so you should get a reading after that, or if you can get a local fish store to test it for you that will give you an idea of the GH. If your water supply is as hard as it appears it may be you will need to mull over how (or even IF) you want to keep shrimps as that may mean using RO or distilled/bottled water and buying a proper shrimp specific remineraliser? That will be quite expensive but you won't then have to mess about adding crushed coral/eggshells etc, but only you can decide whether you want to do/spend that much etc? If you live somewhere that gets a lot of rain, then you can use rain water? Also, as JayC states, you need to know what you are using/adding to the water and aquarium, ie fertilizers, rocks. Unless you have very exotic plants you shouldn't need any fertilizers. Just as a note, we have come across quite a few experienced fish keeprs that have this sort of start off issues with shrimp. Shrimp are more difficult than fish, and the aquarium and water etc need to be ready and within the required parameters before getting the shrimps. Usually people jump in, get the shrimps before everything is ready/sorted. Hopefully though you will keep at it, or if this lot die you will have another go and we can help you get it sorted?
    • jayc
      These are all classic symptoms of shrimp moulting problems.   Again, another high GH symptom. High GH not only causes harder carapace (shell), but it also makes eggs harder. When the egg is harder the male finds it more difficult to fertilise the eggs.   That's a worry if you can't get a good GH reading because that is going to be most likely issue right now for you.   Because snails don't moult.    If you dont already have a TDS meter, I suggest getting one asap. It's another test to narrow down your water parameters, and not have to trust one test by it's own - in this case the GH test kit. I would wager your water parameter is too high in dissolved minerals - likely from the tap water source, fertiliser dosing and/or any rocks/crushed corals you might have in the tank. To remedy this, you need to start doing water changes with RO, distilled or rain water immediately. I would do a 50% water change with RO water asap. Then look for sources that increase GH in the tank and eliminate it - fertilisers, rocks, crush corals, shells.    It's difficult to save a shrimp who's carapace is already too hard, but hopefully any younger shrimps will benefit from the water change and the reduced GH.   Good luck and keep us updated.
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