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New Library Article - DIY Shrimp Tank Fans


CNgo2006
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The Summer months can be particularly harsh and fatal for your shrimps. The temperatures reaching up to the 40 degrees mark depending on where you reside can spell impending doom for your shrimp. During these hot days you can see shrimp keepers around the world posting threads such as "Help shrimp dying!" and "why are my shrimp not active and pale"? The higher temperatures are an invitation for nasty bacteria and diseases, another factor is the shortage of oxygen in the water on those hot summer days.

This article will show how to make a simple, cheap but effective way to help with the hot temperatures during summer, of course this is in no way meant to take the place of a chiller as chillers are always the best way to maintain a stable temperature during summer but this DIY fan should be used only as a means to lower the temperature 2-4 degrees ambient temperature, especially for those of us who reside in areas where the temperature does not get that extreme and can not afford a chiller as yet. Also an excellent cooling solution for Nano tanks! However for larger tanks I can not stress enough that when you can afford a chiller please do get one.

So lets get started, firstly I will explain what parts are needed.

1. Wire Nuts x 2

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2. Laptop Portable Fans x2

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3. 240v to DC 5v 2A switching power supply

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4. Wire Snips

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Now that we have the parts let's get to the DIY part

1. Snip off the USB parts from both of the fans, snip the jack off the power supply and expose wires with the wires snips

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2. The fans will have 2 red wires and 2 black wires each (1 red and black wire for the blue LED's and the other for the fan motor), just join all red to red wires and black to black wires as they will all need to be joined to the power supply.

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3. Now join the exposed positive wire on the power supply to the red wires on the fans and negative wires on the power supply to the black wires of the fans.

(You can tell which is positive and negative by reading the back of power supply).

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4. Screw wire nuts onto the exposed joined wires

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We are done! Now to test! (Note if it does not work then unscrew the wire taps and reverse the positive and negative wires)

http://shrimpkeepers...39909848517.jpg

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On my tests the original temperature of the water was 26 deg on my 40l tank, after approximately 40 minutes it had gone down to 23 deg and was at 22 deg after an hour 15 minutes.

All parts purchased in this DIY was from eBay

Portable Fans - $3 each, $6 for two.

Power Supply - $3.10

Wire Nuts (50 pcs) - $1.50

Wire Snips - Free (had them already)

Making a grand total of $10.60 for an excellent cooling solution!

This is a very easy and cheap DIY, the result is a fan that will lower the temperature of the water by 2-4 degrees.

Click here to view the article

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  • 5 months later...

looks easy enough, ive been thinking about geting some fleabay computer fans to do this. thanks for the wright up! :)

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yea thats true, keep lids on, risk over heating shrimp and fish

 

i might have to invest in one still

 

@CNgo2006 with your powersupply why didnt you just use a usb wall charger? this way you dont need to cut wires :P

Edited by perplex
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@CNgo2006 with your powersupply why didnt you just use a usb wall charger? this way you dont need to cut wires :P

 

I can just see Chi having a facepalm moment when you told him that.

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I can just see Chi having a facepalm moment when you told him that.

haha yea, and i think everyone has them laying around from there phones too ahah

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@CNgo2006 with your powersupply why didnt you just use a usb wall charger? this way you dont need to cut wires :P

I did use usb charger at first but they shorted out after continuos use, with the power supply i can use continuosly for whole day no problems. Also gives me peace of mind...if usb shorts/blows no fans = no shrimp.

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I did use usb charger at first but they shorted out after continuos use, with the power supply i can use continuosly for whole day no problems. Also gives me peace of mind...if usb shorts/blows no fans = no shrimp.

you must of been pulling to much power from it, im sure if you get a 2amp usb charger you will be fine :P

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you must of been pulling to much power from it, im sure if you get a 2amp usb charger you will be fine :P

 

You are correct but the power supply only cost me $3...plus i wanted to join more fans together, the power supply is more then capable of running 2-3

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You are correct but the power supply only cost me $3...plus i wanted to join more fans together, the power supply is more then capable of running 2-3

yea yea, all good! :D

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