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ineke

Any idea?

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ineke

I have some very thin white worms in my tanks, not many in any one tank. The only way I can describe them would be they look like a white sperm with an extra long tail. Can't pick them out in a photo so can't post one. The top half is slightly thicker than the tail, they have a definite head and they aren't planaria. They start out very small and very thin, don't think it's a nematode as they seem to be the same thickness for their full length.

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blackcat

I feed my fish freeze dried tubifex worms and they appear white? I know their blackworms but mine are white cubes ?? Ditrius worms is the other option

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ineke

The tanks are pretty clean , the worms are not tubifex , I used to collect them live for my fish years ago. I've tried googling them but haven't come up with anything. I don't think they will harm the baby shrimp but I would like to know what they are.

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ineke

I'm bumping this up still need help. I have treated twice with internal parasite and although it slowed them down after the first dose they are still swimming around the tank . They start out very small hairlike white worms and eventually look just like sperm but white. I have a few small ones in all tanks and the larger ones only in one tank. I will be dosing the tanks again tomorrow after another water change so any help is greatly appreciated.

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Peppy_11

Probs dumb answer but are you sure they aren't just nematodes? They start as a fine white hair, and internal parasite clear doesn't kill them? And apparently there are bulk different species of them as well. Most being safe but some harmful (Not sure if some can be harmful to shrimp).

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ineke

They might be Peppy I will look up nematodes and see what they are. You are right 3 doses of internal parasite hasn't killed them. Thanks for that.:encouragement:

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JohnH

I think I saw one that looked like what you have described in one of my rack tanks this morning. I was on my way out the door for work so I didn't have a great deal of time to study it. As soon as I saw it, this thread came to mind.

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ineke

I looked up nematodes but they are so fine they are hard to get pictures and all the ones similar were under the microscope. As the internal parasite doesn't kill them and I don't want to put any fish in with the shrimplets I am just going to have to live with them. I have cut way back on food and all my tanks have no nitrates so can't do much else. I have caught a few with a fine net which is easy enough when the get a little bigger but the really small ones are impossible to catch. If they become a real eyesore I may catch the shrimp out and put some fish in to eat them but that would be a real pain in the but trying to catch tiny shrimplets as you would know John:)

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ineke

Thanks jayc good article. Definitely sounds like them. I'm wondering if I'm allowing my mulberry leaves to stay in the tank too long. I leave them until they are mush because the babies like them but maybe that is the detritus causing the out break of worms in most of my tanks. In general the tanks are clean and I am feeding minimal amounts of food except biozyme powder daily for the shrimplets as I have a lot of new ones in my tanks. The leaves are there in case there isn't enough but they do make a mess. I might not put such big pieces in the tanks , just a few small pieces more often. :encouragement:

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northboy

Hi Ineke

If they are not giving your shrimp a hard time, just control them with the syphon hose.

I run all bare tanks, its easier to clean. I also don't have a tank inside the house (yet, soon)

Bob

PS Ineke if I get rude again JUMP on me please

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Squiggle
PS Ineke if I get rude again JUMP on me please

Oh come on Bob! Don't tell me you didn't mean to write that? You're as bad as Ineke, hahaha. :smiley_simmons:

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newbreed

Lol :)

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ineke
Hi Ineke

If they are not giving your shrimp a hard time' date=' just control them with the syphon hose.

I run all bare tanks, its easier to clean. I also don't have a tank inside the house (yet, soon)

Bob

PS Ineke if I get rude again JUMP on me please[/quote']

no Bob you weren't rude I meant don't worry about what people say we all have the right to our opinions and just because 1 or 2 people don't agree with us doesn't mean you shouldn't say anything. I was backing you not telling you off;)

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