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BlueBolts

Shrimp Deformity

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BlueBolts

Genetic defects tend to be avoided within shrimp forums, as we tend to ignore this issue, and just appreciate the fact that we have these shrimps, and are successful in raising them.....often the responsibility for genetic defects is neglected.

Breeders should relinquish selling deformed offspring, and/or genetically weak shrimps. We should as a responsible shrimp community accept opinions and discussions of shrimp deformity, as we are often biased with our own. It may seem impossible to many shrimp keepers in Australia to cull say a Bluebolt, that have a deformity, but especially with our small gene pool. I feel this is an important aspect that we should as a responsible Shrimp community adhere to.

Some common deformities...

1. Balloon Head - the head area is abnormally grown and round (half moon). (Pic 1) Note the antenna.

2. Open Skirt - the first segment of the shrimp is slimmer than usual (Pic 2) Note the antenna.

3. Hunchback - deformed body shape: comes with a kink in the middle of the shrimp (Pic 3)

Pic 1

b7ef94af3a1b3026184f15fdbdb82518.jpg

Pic 2

8cc4914fa19305b214c5e9d4e6467506.jpg

Pic 3

th_e9f21aec3777055676563f8f03ac4543.jpg

As always, please add any comments/discussions to this thread.

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KiwiBigD

Can't say I want to breed from any of those three, that's for sure. Hate culling but it has to be done.

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Squiggle

Thanks BB, I wasn't aware what to look for when it came to deformities in shrimp. I am used to this sort of thing breeding Bettas, they have a big problem with genetic deformities as they are so inbred to get the fancy colours & fin shapes :encouragement:

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ineke

Great write up again BB. I'm not sure i would have picked 1 and 2 but I think I've seen a few pictures with shrimp like number 3 . As you say with our small gene pool we need to be very careful with what we use for breeding.:encouragement:

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ninja

Hmm, sometimes a bad photo makes a bad impression, not always though?

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ninja

Sometimes I have only noticed deformities in my Koi until I noticed it in a photo, because the fish keeps moving.

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ineke

We can't keep koi in SA they are beautiful fish

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HexaD

Great write up again, thanks BB! Just wondering, usually at what age do we see this deforms? Is there a certain routine that you go through i.e. monitor each batch or just when you notice it?

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BlueBolts
Great write up again' date=' thanks BB! Just wondering, usually at what age do we see this deforms? Is there a certain routine that you go through i.e. monitor each batch or just when you notice it?[/quote']

Thanks HexaD. I tend to view them for deformities at 6-8 weeks, but would seriously only cull prior to breeding age. I've fortunately not noticed any deformities to date, I've been EXTRA careful in ensuring my shrimps are genetically strong, with as much X genetical breeding I can do....so I'm always trading and buying shrimps to improve my colonies genetics. No guarantees, but it's definitely the best precaution.

This is a BB at 3 weeks old, which may have recently moulted. Note the down turn in it's nose/antennae. Perhaps it's recently moulted, or just part of maturing/developing ? Will certainly be keeping a CLOSE eye ....

null-4-1.jpg

So basically, my point here is that the deformities, unless obvious, shouldn't really be looked upon until breeding age !

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Aquathumb

I had a red cherry with a hunch back. I didn't have the heart to kill her so I moved her to a tank with only small fish, she died about 6 months after that. other than that I have a adult female chocolate that might have "open skirt" as she has a clear patch as the pic #2 but the odd thing is its not always there!

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BlueBolts
I had a red cherry with a hunch back. I didn't have the heart to kill her so I moved her to a tank with only small fish' date=' she died about 6 months after that. other than that I have a adult female chocolate that might have "open skirt" as she has a clear patch as the pic #2 but the odd thing is its not always there![/quote']

Great if you can post some pics....we all need to be aware and be able to identify it....

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fishmosy

Two points I'd like to raise.

1: Deformities don't just occur in high grade shrimp, so all shrimp keepers should be on the watch and responsible.

Exhibit A from an earlier thread. Note the upturned rostrum.

P1030972_zps44f0cb05.jpg

2: I think deformities should be culled as early as possible. Why? Deformities can often be passed on to subsequent generations. Your deformed shrimp only has to breed once and the deformity can pop up again in its offspring. Worse, if the genetic problem is recessive, the genes can lay dormant and pop up again later, causing the deformities in generations long after you noticed the originator and culled it.

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BlueBolts

Thanks fishmosy.....is exhibit A in shrimp haven now ?

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fishmosy

Yes. It probably wasn't a tranquil passing but I'm sure she is at peace now. (Think dark chasm that closed quickly driven by 100 grams of pure muscle shielded in a clear armour). At least she was useful for something. Hopefully noticed her in time but I suspect not.

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torface

I just found this weird shrimp. Sorry about the poor picture quality, but it has what looks like short, bent antennae? Does it have to be culled?

77c60823-2ded-470a-ab13-cff883c2b6f3_zps2e1f698c.jpg

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BlueBolts

Looks like its holding a blown out umbrella. Got a more side pic ?

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newbreed

Great thread, gives us all an idea of what to look out for. Don't want to pass on deformities that could cause I'll health!

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newbreed

Kind of a can of worms thread. Depends if you want clean pure bloodlines.

In discus they used to cull fish with high fins and smaller bodies, now they are sought after. Like balloon rams and mollies.

I would find it hard to cull balloon head blue bolts. Would probably separate them and try to breed the trait in.

So long as any defects are mentioned at point of sale I think some should be kept. I have a crs with only one leg each side instead of three, looks like a seal wriggling around but swims well and eats well, can't bring myself to cull her. Not sure if this is genetic or damage from mishandling in earlier life.

If one in a batch shows the trait, does that mean all siblings should be culled as well in case it is a recessive trait?

I guess it comes down to keepers choice!! But photos of shrimp being bought prior to purchase should always be recommended as a minimum standard! IMHO

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ninja

Might be gay? " More rights for gays I say".

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newbreed

???

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BlueBolts

As responsible shrimp breeders, I think it is important if we are vigilant with deformities, as having such a small pool of genetics, the threat of them getting into our geno pool is more critical then overseas hobbyist. The deformities mentioned upon this thread, will shorten and lesson the quality of our shrimps, so although culling is a difficult proposition to most, it is a nessecity. IMO.

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ninja

Newbreed, As in your signature line, me too.

Not satisfied with a rainbow dragon, you have to have a rainbow shrimp too?

Knowing Torface, I don't think she would like to put it down?

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newbreed
As responsible shrimp breeders' date=' I think it is important if we are vigilant with deformities, as having such a small pool of genetics, the threat of them getting into our geno pool is more critical then overseas hobbyist. The deformities mentioned upon this thread, will shorten and lesson the quality of our shrimps, so although culling is a difficult proposition to most, it is a nessecity. IMO.[/quote']I do agree. Guess I am just a softy. Like in breeding any breed of animal we need to strive for the best and highest quality in any line, otherwise it would just be mass production.Still trying for a double rainbow dragon.....darn Dragonvale..... :friendly_wink:

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torface

Can't seem to get a better pic of that shrimp but I wil try again tomorrow. There's definitely something wrong with it...

And ninja is right, no I won't like to put it down but I will remove it from my blue velvet breeding tank. I'm quite attached to my blues and I don't want this one breeding with them. Plus I think it's a male, I have loads of males anyway!

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jayc

What about abnormally short Rostrums?

Is that included as a deformity?

 

Not to be confused with rostrums that might get bent after a bad moult. Which is unlikely a genetic issue and should not get passed on.

 

I also have a red cherry who has a small gap between carapace and abdomen. Not Open Skirt like pic 2.

I was given this one by someone who doesn't want to look after shrimp anymore.

I initially thought it was just due to it being kept in poor conditions, not enough Calcium.

 

That gap seems to be closing up after a few moults in better water parameters however. 

 

Would you all consider this gap between carapace and abdomen a genetic defect?

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