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BlueBolts

Dealing with Power Loss

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BlueBolts

Loosing power at home is often not a consideration until it happens, and often at the worst scenario and time. Due to the strict and sensitive water parameters our shrimps require, a dangerous scenario can be created, and be detrimental to our shrimps….BUT this scenario can be avoided.

Power outages within the 0-2 hour range isn’t too much of a concern, but outages over the 2+ hours can be critical. The 2 major issues of power outages are filtration and temperature.

If there are scheduled power outages, forecast electrical storm …etc that are imminent, a good water change can be performed on the previous day. Avoiding feeding, thus reducing the bio-load of the shrimp tank should also be considered.

Further precautions we can take.

  1. Battery Powered Air Pump – Maintains Oxygenation of Water
  2. Waste Removal – Absolutely minimal feeding & water changes, to ensure levels of ammonia and nitrite is kept in control.
  3. Remove Tank Cover – Ensure aeration/exchange of water/air and access to tank. During the winter months, keeping the tank cover on for heat retention is an option.
  4. Unplug all electrical equipment – Due to temperature variation, un-primed power filtration. All canister filters should be opened to allow for air/oxygen. Rinse the filter medium with tank water, to prevent “die-off†of all beneficial bacteria. This will assist to establish the biological filtration much more efficiently once the power returns.
  5. Depending of the season (Summer – Winter), stability of tank temperature is critical. Summer option - a cooling breeze (opening windows …), restricting direct sunlight, ice blocks … etc. Winter option – Gas heating, heating water on a gas stove….etc Ensure that any steps taken are gradual.
  6. Diesel/Petrol Power Generator – The BEST & IDEAL option, but there’s cost consideration. An estimate of all your equipment (i.e. heater, filter, air pump…etc) power needs, will be required to calculate the size of the power generator required. Whatever the Amps/Watts, DOUBLE it !

When the power returns, turn each equipment on, one at a time and ensure all is working perfectly (i.e. filters primed etc…). I tend to flush out my canister filter into a bucket before returning it to the tank, to ensure any gunk, dead bacteria…etc won’t be poured into the tank, further stressing the bio-load.

Power outages can be extremely stressful. Having or even thinking of a contingency and preparing for them, can avoid any disasters and add further stress.

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al4n

Nice write up BB..!

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BlueBolts

Doing a thorough WP test especially on nitrates is advisable. As part of my emergency backup, I have 2 bags of nitrazorb on hand.

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Squiggle

Very cool write up indeed BB, as usually :encouragement:

image-74_zps0ca661f4.jpg

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torface

Thanks for this BlueBolts... i've been witness to several large power outages in just over a year (Cyclone Yasi= 6 days, Big SEQ storm=24 hours) so i've been afraid of power outages since i've had my big tank but luckily haven't had one yet. This post is very helpful :)

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BlueBolts

Pleasure ..... I'm extremely mindful of "issues" that can destroy our love for the hobby ! So a power cut, and a tank full of dead shrimps can just about do it ! Touch wood...

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