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lachie1998

Blue Rilli

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Naraic

Kinda on topic, but does anyone have the breeding history on the development of the original rili pattern? I've been spinning myself in circles as to how the colour segregation was achieved; I assume two colour morphs of heterapoda where involved and by chance genes for parts of the thorax and some pleomere came from one and genes for the telson and rear pleomere came from the other. Like I said assumption, does anyone have or know the real story? Dean? BB?

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BlueBolts

I'd suspect its a genetic mutation, and a geno cell representing clear bodies. The rili pattern occurred within th selective breeding of my SW/GB.

post-24-139909847522_thumb.jpg

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Heavyd

What a striking looking shrimp!

I really don't understand where you have the room for all your projects.

Do you have an underground secret fish-room where you conduct your experiments?

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BlueBolts
What a striking looking shrimp!

I really don't understand where you have the room for all your projects.

Do you have an underground secret fish-room where you conduct your experiments?

Thanks. Only recently added a breeding rack (4 tanks)...so have 12 tanks, but theoritically 24, as I mix my caridina & neocaridina, plus have great stock ....plus lots of luck.

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Heavyd

Lol. It seems like every couple of days you release a new mutant to awe us with. I like your work ;)

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BlueBolts

But wait, there's more ! LOL ....

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smicko

No teasing bb lol. Maybe we could start a forum section for all the new shrimp created by the members of skf. Then everyone would know where the original strains came from in the future.

Cheers Mick

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sajica
I'd suspect its a genetic mutation' date=' and a geno cell representing clear bodies. The rili pattern occurred within th selective breeding of my SW/GB.[/quote']

Is that a line you're looking to persue? If so let me know next time you come onto the shop. I have something for you :)

It didn't include a pic of the shrimp in the quote

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Gbang

just to be clear. the rilli pattern on snow whites is more common than you think! check it out on google. i've had quite a few normal cherry shrimps just grow up with transparent areas in their nody. and i know of many others who have experienced this as well. i guess it was just a case of line breeding later on for overseas breeders. i believe done wah has created a blue rilli with red only on the tail and called it a pheonix rilli?

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