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Parasitic Algae?


Marie
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Help please! I got this shrimp on Saturday and last night spotted this yellow stuff on her. I've removed her from the tank and she's in jug. Is there anything I can try? Thank you.

Screenshot_20220822-172005_Gallery.jpg

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Hi @Marie,

this is what's called Ellobiopsidae.

We have a post on it in the Diseases and Diagnostics thread. Have a read of it here ....

But the summary is ...

The only treatment that I know of that has worked is medication with Formalin & Malachite green combo.

Some off the shelf products with Formalin that also includes malachite green include:

  • Fritz Mardel QuICK Cure is one such product.
  • Aquasonic has one too.
  • Kordon Rid Ick Plus also uses the same ingredients.
  • Seachem Paraguard

 

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Oh, thank you. I tried a salt bath last night after a bit of research. I'll see if I can find any of those products. I'm in the UK...

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8 hours ago, Marie said:

I tried a salt bath

Did the salt bath work? 

Didn't think a salt bath would have worked, but I'm opening to learning new methods of treatment.

 

Here is an Amazon link to a product https://a.co/d/97dwbNn

 

Also, can I use your photo for the Disease and Diagnostics thread?

Edited by jayc
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I had a look last night and saw the following on ebay from UK sellers (there are more sellers than just this one), it isn't meant for shrimp but for Koi,

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/403847496794?hash=item5e072fc45a:g:AT0AAOSwFZhiuvLi&amdata=enc%3AAQAHAAAAoELtkxX0y1eOp0VY6LduoJ1NkgqHvNf9m%2BxDA9nwGWMeHXPlhuBuoHLz1Hg4c9dLBF19lNew47GjxpEg14BP%2BbkhhYZuDGT93wbzXt%2B4mrA1W6sKEw5AXPJ07QZDU%2BAl80M7ezmebad84QXyk52N9Mdiwl5eFUvOOzDWcs2Q22Rvmc8ngUZDsbBkWrSF1Zf%2B18Q39XFt9sOtFyCNAitt7DY%3D|tkp%3ABk9SR6LrtPDZYA

Depending on where you want to go next, ie is it worth the expense, time and hassle of trying to treat (especially if it only appears to be one shrimp affected), it may be worth trying the above by adding one small drop at a time (a day) to the seperated container and see if it works, but it would be an 'experiment' and you have little to lose as the shrimp will probably die off anyway??? You should probably remove some water from the shrimp container and mix in the medication well, and then return that water to the shrimp container (slowly), rather that just put the medication straight into the shrimp container water with the shrimp in situ.

There is also the link from JayC but I don't see that as a product we have in the UK so I don't know whether that is 'legal' here? It appears to be the same Koi product but doesn't show up on UK Amazon when I tried and don't know which country it would come from?

Hopefully you only have the one affected shrimp and as you have seperated it quickly, fingers crossed it wasn't spread in the tank?

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13 hours ago, sdlTBfanUK said:

it isn't meant for shrimp but for Koi,

Yeah, Formalin+Malachite Green is very commonly marketed at Koi owners. They must use a lot of it for koi. 

Just be careful with the amount used for bottles marketed for use in ponds. 

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Hi, I treated the whole tank with a Formalin+Malachite Green product 24 hours ago and put the shrimp in some of the treated tank water. I have to say it looks better. Hard to see as it's in a jug but the majority of the yellow matter has gone.

The treatment course is 5ml/100L every other day for about a week so I will finish the course and see. 

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I hope it works out and you keep us updated. A bit brave/risky to do the whole tank, I would have just done the separate shrimp first to see how that went!

If you don't mind can you let us know what the product is that you are using, for refernce of others in the future etc? You have stated the mixture amount so that is also useful - I assume that is the recommended dose for the Koi?

Really good news it appears to be improving so quickly and I will keep my fingers crossed and hope to hear it has worked out well?

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