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Rostrum and antennae issues with Sulawesi shrimp


NiceShrimp
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In one of my Sulawesi tanks for the passed month or two ive been noticing my berried shrimp are growing something on their antennae, rostrum, legs, and sometimes behind their eyes on top of their head. I have researched common dwarf shrimp diseases and none seem to look like what is going on in my tank. Also the only shrimp that seem to be affected by this are berried shrimp and then once they molt they return back to looking normal. No deaths in the tank and still lots of breeding going on. Will have link to video of issues below because it won't let me post on here

https://imgur.com/NxbAgl0

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Wow, I've not seen that before.

Can you give us your water parameters? Everything you have a test kit for.

 

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0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, 0 nitrates, 7 GH, 7.8-8.0 ph, typical Sulawesi parameters using Sulawesi 8.5 remineralizer and rodi water treated with prime. What really has me the most confused is that this tank is absolutely thriving with lots of hatchlings and lots of berried shrimp besides what ever is going on with these growths the tank is doing incredibly well. The only shrimp affected by these growths are berried shrimp ive not seen any other shrimp with these growths except the ones carrying eggs. Here is small video of the whole colony https://imgur.com/23upN7T

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Wow, thats an impressive collection of Sulawesi shrimps you have there!

It looks quite like fungus, though why that only affects the berried shrimp is a bit weird, though sometimes eggs get fungus, maybe it has spread from the eggs? Could it be vorticello (???) Have a read through this thread and see if that helps;

 

 

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I don't think it is Vorticella because the growths are brown-red colored maybe slightly green and also the general structure doesn't look similar to me at all. The eggs remain viable and only molt after the hatchlings are born. I know this because I have not seen any dropped eggs or eggs attached to molts and I have 50+ hatchlings minimum in this tank. After they molt they return to a completely normal appearance. Below is another attachment to what the shrimp look like when "infected" with this growth and also what the molt looks like after its been shed. My only theory that ive been able to come up with is that its algae growing on the shrimp because it affects the areas most exposed to the light but I am not sure.  https://imgur.com/RBrJWYQ

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Maybe it is fungus, I had a look at that on the thread I just attached! Maybe this is because the berried shrimp are more suseptible as they are under more stress and therefore prone to getting it.

At least it doesn't sound like it is causing any fatalities or shortage of shrimplets.

Is there anything different between this tank and the other tanks you have, were they all set up about the same time etc, generally fungus happens more with newly set up tanks. 

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I have two Sulawesi tanks and the one that is having these growths is my main tank that is the most established and oldest. My 2nd tank is also thriving but not having any of these growths, and the shrimp in my 2nd tank are originally from my main tank, now with multiple generations of shrimp in there from its own breeding. If it is a fungus wouldn't I be seeing deaths or at the very least a reduction in breeding? My main tank has over 10 berried shrimp in there at the moment not all of them have these growths but a few of them do for sure

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Just copy/pasted from the thread to below, I cannot speak from personal experience as I haven't experienced it, but it seems to indicate weakened shrimp are more prown, which maybe what is happening with yours as only 'some' get it?

You could try treating them but I would just keep an eye on them at this point rather than run the risk of treating the infected ones.

Fungal Infections:

Fungal infections are common in the fish hobby, but it possible for shrimp to get fungal infections as well.
It's unavoidable, since fungal spores are everywhere, in the air and water.
Fungi are plant like organisms but unlike plants are not capable of photosynthesis. All fungal diseases are called Mycosis (plural: mycoses). Internal infestation by fungal spores is usually ingested by food. If the immune system is intact, the shrimp can fight it off. However, if the internal organs are infected by fungal spores, death is possible. Internal diagnosis is difficult and only possible under a microscope.
An external/superficial mycosis infection however is visible to the naked eye. Symptoms of superficial fungal infection caused by Achlya or Saprolegnia can be seen as white fluffy cotton growths in the abdomen or head areas. As mentioned fungi are usually fought off by a healthy immune system, so we only see this in weakened or injured shrimp or just after a moult. The moulting process takes a lot of energy out of the shrimp and it's immune system will be heavily loaded. It's during these moments when the shrimp have been weakened that fungi can take hold. Spores attach themselves to weakened sites on the shrimp and break out as a cottony white growth.

If not treated quickly, the spores will invade any dead tissue cells and in the process infect more tissue causing a greater infection.

At times, if the infection is only on the surface of the shrimp's shell, a moult can get rid of the fungus. It is only by timeliness/chance that such a situation could rectify itself. At other times, treatment is required.

post-3460-139909854165_thumb.jpg
post-3460-139909854168_thumb.jpg

Treatment1: Separate the infected shrimp and treat with JBL's Fungol
Dosage: follow packaging instructions for the dosage and duration.

Note: JBL Fungol does not contain copper but it also says not to use it with invertebrates.
If left untreated the shrimp will die, so a certain risk in using the product is going to be required.

Fungol could be replaced with a similar fungal medication, but check that the product does not contain copper at least.

 

Treatment 2:  Methylene blue

As an application for external parasites and prevention of eggs getting fungus.

Dosage: 3-4mg per 1L of water.

 

Treatment 3: Malachite green

For treatment of fungal infections.

Dosage: 0.05mg per 1L of water for a duration of 7 days. 50% water change each day.

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11 hours ago, NiceShrimp said:

If it is a fungus wouldn't I be seeing deaths or at the very least a reduction in breeding?

It could be a form of fungus. There are sooooo many varieties of fungus, not all of them are detrimental. 

You could try a fungal medication, but I would dose at half the recommended rate that the bottle specifies. 

A 5 minute salt bath could be worth trying as well.

 

This could also be an algae. How bright does that tank get? 

Try adding some floating plants or reduce the light duration to 6 hours.

 

Definitely keep us in the loop whatever you try. I would love to get to the bottom of this.

Edited by jayc
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My lighting is definitely on the intense side I was running the lights 24/7 for a couple months to promote breeding which worked really well, but I suspect it is algae growing on them because of the lighting regime. For the last week or so ive been doing 12 hours on 12 hours off but I might reduce to 6 hours of lighting and see if what is growing on them clears up. Hopefully with reduced lighting it will clear up in the near future. The input is appreciated thank you to everyone who commented 

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26 minutes ago, NiceShrimp said:

running the lights 24/7 for a couple months

Uh yeah ... that would be it.  That's why it wasn't harming the shrimp.

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Yeah I suspected this was the case that it is algae growing on them but I didn't want to assume anything  

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