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Cull from a red rili line


Kelly
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Ok I bought a cull from a guy that breeds red rili. I didn’t want to buy top quality shrimp yet because I’m new to shrimp hobby and bound to and have (bought a internal filter tank my 1st mistake) make mistakes. I have been researching the subject but as you all know there’s a lot of information out there. Now I think the females I have has  recessive rili gene in them  but they are all red bodies and don’t show rili markings at all. I am guessing they fire reds....but unsure. The males I think are low grade rili. Red head and red tail somewhat clear middle. What’s my chances of getting a good rili out of this batch? Do they get their looks more from their mothers or dads? If they have shrimplets I plan to cull them by putting unwanted ones down stairs in community tank. When I feel ready to buy a good batch of rili should I just put all  these ones down stairs and  focus on the good quality shrimp or do it the hard way  and breed all and see what I end up with? 

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59 minutes ago, Kelly said:

Now I think the females I have has  recessive rili gene in them  but they are all red bodies and don’t show rili markings at all. I am guessing they fire reds....but unsure.

It's difficult to tell. You should ask the person you bought them from what he thinks it is.

I wouldn't call them Fire Reds, as that will confuse the situation. Rillis do not revert to Fire Reds.  And an almost red Rillis does not make it a Fire Red.

If the guys says these are Rillis, than what you have are just Rillis, albeit low quality Rillis.

 

1 hour ago, Kelly said:

When I feel ready to buy a good batch of rili should I just put all  these ones down stairs and  focus on the good quality shrimp or do it the hard way  and breed all and see what I end up with? 

Yes, separate them. Breeding these current low quality Rillis with a better quality Rillis will just produce poorer quality overall. 

Say you buy new A grade shrimp and breed them with C grade shrimp. You end up with shrimp between B and C grade, never A grade.

Offspring will get traits from both parents. 

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I mean, the shrimp you have there is already a beautiful shrimp. If you want to turn that line into a rili line, using the low grade rili males, it'll take a few generations to get some nice ones popping out, and at that stage you'll probably want to bring in someone else's rili line anyway to increase genetic variation. It's up to you whether you want to go for the more interesting alternative of breeding your own line, or just buying one. Just know you're not likely to get anything special from the first batch.

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The shrimp in the picture looks more like my bloody mary than a fire red.That is a female with eggs inside........ lovely solid colour!

I wouldn't get too bogged down with what to do in the future at this stage, wait and see how it goes with the current batch, removing any poor quality as you plan. There is no real way of knowing what shrimp carries what genes when you start out as you are?

Simon

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I know they aren’t cherry...they too red and I don’t think they are Bloody Mary their flesh aren’t red and I believe Bloody Mary has  red shell and flesh. They do have red legs though...

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I know I have a  berried  shrimp... one came that way but I just noticed another molted..... so maybe more on the way....I still want to move them to 8 gallon eventually...but I’m unsure when the little shrimplets be born.....

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10 hours ago, Kelly said:

I know they aren’t cherry

Why would you say that? It's certainly not a Rilli. Looks more like a Red Cherry to me.

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Definitely looks like a high grade cherry to me. And as with Simon, I'm leaning towards Bloody Mary. 

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I meant low graded cherry. They too red in colour. They probably have  low grade cherry in their background and I’m sure if I don’t cull it will eventually show that. The breeder is working with red rili line. This is a cull from that line. 

I will put them in the 8 gallon by this weekend I think. I want to make sure everything ok 1st.

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