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blacksails

Curious to know how my blue jelly shrimp have produced a clear orange offspring? Any help would be awesome

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blacksails

Hey guys new to the wonderful world of shrimp keeping, my tank has been cycled for about 3 months now and start of December I got my first shrimpey's! I choose blue jelly's as they are beautiful 🙂 a month in and I have about 3 sets of babys swimming around!! They are all super clear right now getting slightly more blue each day, but there's an odd guy in the bunch..one of the biggest infact is completely see through orange in colour!! No clear no blue but orange..he's got such character and is often doing zoomies around my tank 🙂 but yeh couldn't seem to find any info out there so thought I could consult the community thank you for any opinions on this lovely little oddity

Struggling to get pic uploaded because of size issues will try update with pics tomorrow

 

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sdlTBfanUK

Sorry for the late reply, I have been without internet for a week.

There could be a couple of reasons for the colour change. Neocaridina will revert back to the wild type colour (brown usually) unless you keep culling oddbods, and this will be a constant chore unfortunately. Mixing colours will speed up this reversion, but it will still happen even if they are all one colour! If you don't kepp on top of it it son gets out of control as mine has so you need to decide early on what you want to do? My tank would have to be started again at this stage as, with new shrimps, as mine are 90% wild type?

Simon

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