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Walstad method / ecosphere


Flynn002
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Hi, I’m wanting to setup a large glass bowl for my neocaridina shrimp by using the walstad method ( heavily planted, no filter, equipment or CO2) I would do weekly water changes. I’ve done lots of research on the walstad method and think I can successfully create one. I would just like to know if anyone else has successfully made a shrimp aquarium using the walstad method and if they have any tips or tricks.

 

Also, I have a bought a large 15L sealable jar and want to make a fully sealed eco system with my shrimp, snails and plants. Again, I have researched this but was looking to see if anyone else has created a successful eco jar.

 

Thanks, Flynn

 

 

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Hi Flynn,

I haven't tried this method myself, but I've seen others do it, and it seems to work quite well as long as your starting water is fine and you've done your research. The 'sealed ecosystem' bit has me worried though - shrimp (and snails? probably ahaha) need oxygen, and if you plan on this lasting very long, I don't think it'll work if it is fully sealed. The plants also need natural CO2 to grow, so limiting their supply of it may not turn out well. When fish and shrimp are sold in non-breather bags, you have to be mindful of how long you're transporting them for - not for lack of food, but for lack of air. Mind, that is a more stressful environment, hence they ventilate more, but you'll still have them in there for much longer than they would be held in a bag.

Hope that helps,
Crabby

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I’ve read on forums that people have successfully kept and bred shrimp in sealed ecosystems for years and years. You grow out the plants in a big jar for a month or so before adding the shrimp and sealing it. The shrimp eat the biofilm, moss and algae that you are growing inside the jar. The shrimp and snails create CO2, the plants use that and create oxygen. It has to be very heavily planted though as the waste from the shrimp needs to be broken down.


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