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Gh+ and scud problem


Able
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So now my neo tank I infested with scuds......

is there any safe way to eliminate them? Without removing all shrimp?

Also I started a 20 gallon long for cardinias.

matten filter

tds130 but I can’t get the gh  above 4-5 without raising the tds over 150 what am I doing wrong?

i use rodi water  tds0 with shrimp king gh+

Using Brightwell substrate 

 

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16 minutes ago, Able said:

is there any safe way to eliminate them? Without removing all shrimp?

Only way is to physically catch them either with a net or a trap. Unfortunately any chemical treatment will kill scuds will also impact shrimps.

 

16 minutes ago, Able said:

tds130 but I can’t get the gh  above 4-5 without raising the tds over 150 what am I doing wrong?

150 TDS is still ok for Caridina. 

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The TDS of 130-150 is perfecr for caridina shrimp, as is the GH 4-5 so there is no problem there! If you are using the shrimp GH+ with RO water then it is perfectly balanced for shrimps and try not to obsess about hitting an exact figure balance.

I had some waterlouse in one of my tanks so i had to re-do the tank. It was a long time ago but it worked and haven't had any since. I was using leaves from a pond and that must have been how they got into the tank. I didn't use any chemicals just took everything out and checked it, and re-set it up, using the same plants etc but carefully checking there were no hitchhikers. They weren't difficult to catch but without removing everything you won't know if you have got them all? You can just put the shrimp and fish in a bucket temporarily while you do the tank. Even filters etc will need to be checked/cleaned as well of course! Be very thorough and don't rush through it and be careful with any equipment like nets as you don't want to accidently transfer a tiny scud to another tank etc.

As JayC says any chemicals will also likely kill shrimps so you would still need to remove them if you want to use chemicals! 

Simon

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I saw a you tube video from Flip aquatics and he said cardinia want gh 6-8 but if I use the gh+ to get it that high then my tds is 180-200?

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Ok thank you . 
i guess the scuds will just have to stay.

i can’t use a gravel vacuum cause I have black sand as substrate.

 

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They are harmless and a sign of good water quality so you can leave them in the tank but will probably need to keep culling as many as you can every so often. I think they were fairly easy to catch if I recall correctly?

The main thing is to be very careful about possibly transferrng them by mistake to other tanks. I would get a net just for that tank, that would be the easiest precaution, and don't move plants etc from that tank!

Simon

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