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Ludwiggg17

Native Caridina breeding advice

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Ludwiggg17

Hey all, so im thinking about a breeding project for a species of native caridina in my area. I would like to ask if anyone here has had any experience breeding a wild caridina with the aim of creating a new kind of like type of shrimp. If so, I would like to ask you something. Thanks in advance

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jayc

What's your question?

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Ludwiggg17

So do these kind of breeding-from-wild projects take long or would some characteristics appear in a few generations of breeding?

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sdlTBfanUK

I wouldn't think there is a definitive answer to this but you will probably just have to try it to find out what happens?

Have the wild ones you are keeping bred successfully yet, that would be the first step?

I hope I am wrong and someone may come forward with some advice!

Simon

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jayc
6 hours ago, Ludwiggg17 said:

breeding-from-wild projects take long or would some characteristics appear

Breeding wild shrimps with the intention of getting something that resembles anything else apart from what it looks like now will take many generations of culling. Even getting it to change colour can take many, many generations with culling and patience. After all, mother nature, has taken many thousands of years to get them to look they way they look now. Imagine trying to undo it.

Unless of course, IF, you get it to breed with a modern day Caridina that has already been bred for the colour - that will quicken the process a bit. This is of course hybridising, and those shrimps you have will never be native anymore. This will still take a lot of patience and culling to get results. Of, and you will need many tanks to hold all the various generation of shrimps. And a bit of luck thrown in for good measure.

This is how we got the colourful shrimps we have now. None of them are pure/native, they are all a hybrid, a mix of species. 

Instead, I suggest enjoying and APPRECIATING the native shrimp in it's original form. 

I breed the local Australian native shrimps. I love them in it's natural form, colour and patterns. My tanks with these native Aust shrimp are pure line of course. And in the 5-6 years I have had them, NONE, I repeat, NONE have changed colour, or pattern. Some might be darker in colour, some might be lighter. But essentially, they have always been the same. Mother nature has designed them like that.

Unless you get a mutation, which is rare. Or you introduce another species into the mix. At which point you will need to start learning about genetics and Mendel's theory of heredity. 

Edited by jayc
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Ludwiggg17

 

On 3/17/2020 at 5:53 AM, jayc said:

Breeding wild shrimps with the intention of getting something that resembles anything else apart from what it looks like now will take many generations of culling. Even getting it to change colour can take many, many generations with culling and patience. After all, mother nature, has taken many thousands of years to get them to look they way they look now. Imagine trying to undo it.

Unless of course, IF, you get it to breed with a modern day Caridina that has already been bred for the colour - that will quicken the process a bit. This is of course hybridising, and those shrimps you have will never be native anymore. This will still take a lot of patience and culling to get results. Of, and you will need many tanks to hold all the various generation of shrimps. And a bit of luck thrown in for good measure.

This is how we got the colourful shrimps we have now. None of them are pure/native, they are all a hybrid, a mix of species. 

Instead, I suggest enjoying and APPRECIATING the native shrimp in it's original form. 

I breed the local Australian native shrimps. I love them in it's natural form, colour and patterns. My tanks with these native Aust shrimp are pure line of course. And in the 5-6 years I have had them, NONE, I repeat, NONE have changed colour, or pattern. Some might be darker in colour, some might be lighter. But essentially, they have always been the same. Mother nature has designed them like that.

Unless you get a mutation, which is rare. Or you introduce another species into the mix. At which point you will need to start learning about genetics and Mendel's theory of heredity. 

Sorry for the late response, thanks for enlightening me with your knowledge jayc. I guess I will just leave them as is if it needs that much effort in getting any result from breeding them. Many thanks to everyone that replied to this post 🙂

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