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xrayguy

bacter ae, how often, and how to use

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xrayguy

hi guys, lurker, but want some help to increase my shrimpet survival rate.  I have been using bacter ae, but have been just placing it on the surface with the filters off when i feed the shrimp/fish.  I've been following the instrustions on the package loosely as i don't feed my fish daily.

I've noticed a bit of a drop in my shrimp numbers, that is why i've been feeding bacter ae more regularly.   But other factors could be in play.

My parameters were

Ph 6.8 with CO2 on, 

NO3 10-20

PO4 1.

KH 3

GH 5

I have a heavily planted tank, with cherry shrimp, orange shrimp and whatever mutts that come along with them ( we love them equally).

For fish, I have CPD's ( I fear they may be the problem), neons, corys, emarld eye rasboras, ember tetras.

How do others introduce bacter ae into their tanks?  I feel the film on the surface of my tank may just sucked up in my filter?  

I don't think that's the only thing that can help the survival rate, but I'm open to ideas?

 

thanx

richard

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Steensj2004

I use a spare glass test vial. I add the Bacter AE into the tube with some tank water, shake till combined, abs distribute across the tank evenly. I find I like it this way better as it enters the water column instantly.

 

 

I also has  some CPDs for a very short time. They were definitely eating my babies as my numbers of babies per batch increased at least 3-fold after moving them to another tank. My shrimp are also much more active without them in the tank.

Edited by Steensj2004
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jayc

I feed powdered foods to shrimplets using a turkey baster after mixing it in water. 

That way the shrimplets are guaranteed to get some. I find sprinkling it on the surface is hit and miss. Either the adults get to it first or it sinks and settles on top of plants, instead of under plants where the shrimplets are hiding.

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sdlTBfanUK

I don't actually think that Bacter AE is meant as a shrimp FOOD, as such it is supposed to help the biofilm grow and the shrimp eat that? I put a bit of Bacter AE in twice a week, less than manufacturers recommend but I also use Chi Ebi as that is specially formulated food for baby shrimp to eat! Most maufacturers produce a food for baby shrimps, but again I used a lot less than the manufacturers recommend, and will again if/when baby season starts (taiwan bee shrimp).

As Steenj2004 states, ANY fish will eat baby shrimp as they are so small (but they grow fairly quickly). This can work both ways of coarse, as it can stop you getting over-run with shrimp, so it depends why you want more baby shrimp as to what action you take. Over time even with the fish the population should still grow but slower, especially if there is lots of moss for the babies to hide in when newly born. Unless your shrimp numbers are dwindling I would just carry on as is and accept the fish must get some. We have had people on here who want to know how to better control shrimp numbers and you probably have the best solution????

Simon

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Steensj2004

As Jayc mentioned, using a tool to blast some food into/under the plants is a good idea too. I use disposable pipettes from time to time to do this. Honestly, they last a long time and a bag of 100 can be had very cheaply. They come in handy for other tank related maintenance too.

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kms

I use the supplied spoon and only a tiny bit, something like about 1g every 2-3 days, and just sprinkle it on the water surface, but since I only have a 12 inch tank, it can reach all area, my shrimps has grown a lot recently, two shrimps also have berries.

Since I used the Bacter AE, its the first time my leave at the back look like this.

20200130_163451.jpg

Edited by kms
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  • Posts

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      Maybe around 10 or so I know that many people claim to have increased baby survival rate by dosing various baby foods or Bacter AE.  What has your survival rate been?
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