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    • Dashrimp
      By Dashrimp
      RCS  shrimplet magnified about 200x sitting on gravel
       
      https://drive.google.com/file/d/1moU2KcEaVuuzS8AtoBF9J_w1bZEYlXVN/view?usp=sharing
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Melanoides tuberculata, commonly known as Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS), originated from all over Africa and Southern Asia. MTS are generally introduced into fish tanks accidentally by being attached to new plants or used aquarium decorations. They can come in a range of shapes, patterns and sizes. Opinions on MTS are divided with most having a strong dislike to them due to how quickly they breed and take over a tank. However, these snails can also be beneficial. As they move eating detritus and leftover food under the substrate, they are also aerating it. This in turn supports root growth and air exchange which are great in planted tanks.
      How Do They Breed
      Malaysian Trumpet Snails breed extremely fast, particularly in good tank conditions. The rapid breeding abilities of the MTS is one of the main reasons they are a concern to aquatic tank keepers. One method that works well with our members here is to use some vegetables like a sliced cucumber. Turn the lights off, wait a little while and remove. You can also limit their population growth by being strict with your feeding regime and removing any uneaten food from the tank. Take note though, without the use of a chemical deterrent, which is harmful to your other invertebrates, it will be unlikely that you can remove 100% of them.
      What Do They Eat
      They are not difficult to feed. Primarily, Malaysian Trumpet Snails consume large amounts of algae and detritus. They are also good scavengers – eating leftover food and fish waste as they burrow underneath the substrate; thus, doing their share of cleaning the tank. They are especially helpful to aquarists who collect messy freshwater fish, including goldfish, and who keeps live plants. No, MTS generally do not eat live plants. You can also supplement their diet by feeding them with leafy vegetables or any plant-based fish food. Just don’t overfeed them as this will cause a snail outbreak.
      Water Parameters
      These snails are not difficult to care for as they only require minimal attention. If the tank is good enough for your fish and/or shrimp, there is a good chance that it will be fine for them. That said, if you want to get technical, they should be kept in a freshwater tank range with the following water conditions:
      water temperature from 21° C to 26° C pH of 7.0 to 7.5 Sources:
      Vogler, R. E., Núñez, V., Gregoric, D. G., Beltramino, A. A., & Peso, J. G. (2012). Melanoides tuberculata: The history of an invader. Chapter, 3, 65-85.
        Image credit - @Paul Minett
       Image credit - Nogi
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Melanoides tuberculata, commonly known as Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS), originated from all over Africa and Southern Asia. MTS are generally introduced into fish tanks accidentally by being attached to new plants or used aquarium decorations. They can come in a range of shapes, patterns and sizes. Opinions on MTS are divided with most having a strong dislike to them due to how quickly they breed and take over a tank. However, these snails can also be beneficial. As they move eating detritus and leftover food under the substrate, they are also aerating it. This in turn supports root growth and air exchange which are great in planted tanks.
      How Do They Breed
      Malaysian Trumpet Snails breed extremely fast, particularly in good tank conditions. The rapid breeding abilities of the MTS is one of the main reasons they are a concern to aquatic tank keepers. One method that works well with our members here is to use some vegetables like a sliced cucumber. Turn the lights off, wait a little while and remove. You can also limit their population growth by being strict with your feeding regime and removing any uneaten food from the tank. Take note though, without the use of a chemical deterrent, which is harmful to your other invertebrates, it will be unlikely that you can remove 100% of them.
      What Do They Eat
      They are not difficult to feed. Primarily, Malaysian Trumpet Snails consume large amounts of algae and detritus. They are also good scavengers – eating leftover food and fish waste as they burrow underneath the substrate; thus, doing their share of cleaning the tank. They are especially helpful to aquarists who collect messy freshwater fish, including goldfish, and who keeps live plants. No, MTS generally do not eat live plants. You can also supplement their diet by feeding them with leafy vegetables or any plant-based fish food. Just don’t overfeed them as this will cause a snail outbreak.
      Water Parameters
      These snails are not difficult to care for as they only require minimal attention. If the tank is good enough for your fish and/or shrimp, there is a good chance that it will be fine for them. That said, if you want to get technical, they should be kept in a freshwater tank range with the following water conditions:
      water temperature from 21° C to 26° C pH of 7.0 to 7.5 Sources:
      Vogler, R. E., Núñez, V., Gregoric, D. G., Beltramino, A. A., & Peso, J. G. (2012). Melanoides tuberculata: The history of an invader. Chapter, 3, 65-85.
        Image credit - @Paul Minett
       Image credit - Nogi

      View full article
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Planorbidae make up a significant portion of aquaitic pulmonate gastropods. In Australia alone, there are over 20 species group taxa that have been described. Their common name, ramshorn snails, comes from the spiral shape of their shells, which looks like a ram’s horn.
      Ramshorn snails come in a wide range of colours, including red, brown and black, and they can even be shimmery and translucent in colour. Because of the unique design on their shells and their colour, they can be a welcomed addition to an aquarium, offering vibrant colour and interest. However, oftentimes, these snails inadvertently appear in aquariums, hitchhiking on the live plants and/or accessories that have been transferred from one tank to another. If there is enough food available, these snails can quickly breed and take over an aquarium; but, if they are properly maintained, they can be a welcomed addition, even if their presence was not intended. These snails eat food that is leftover in the water, dead plant material and algae, and as such, they can help to maintain the health and appearance of an aquarium.
      Maintaining Ramshorn Snails
      Whether you are interested in adding ramshorn snails to your aquarium or they have taken up residence unexpectedly and you decide that you want to keep them, it’s important to understand how to properly maintain them, which fortunately, is easy to do.
      They do well in aquariums of various sizes. They are also very adaptable, which means that they can do well in various types of water conditions, though they prefer water that is filtered. Additionally, they do best in tanks that do not undergo sudden changes in their condition. These snails consume algae and food remnants from fish, but they prefer to eat dying and dead plant matter that is shed from live plants. They will also eat dead fish, shrimp or other snails.
       
      Things to Avoid
      If you are interested in maintaining Ramshorn snails in your aquarium, you should be aware that there are species of fish that will eat them. The most common predators of Ramshorn snails include bettas, loaches and dwarf puffer fish. Assassin snails will also prey on these snails.
      Live Plants
      Some people claim that Ramshorn snails destroy their live plants, while others have reported they do not cause any issues. However, in most cases, they do very little damage to live plants, but if a large amount of them are present and there are delicate plants in the aquarium, such as Water Sprite and Cabomba, they can do damage.
      Behaviour
      Ramshorn snails are peaceful and non-aggressive. They will not cause issues with fish, shrimp or other types of snails in an aquarium. They spend their time moving about the tank eating and adding interesting colour, texture and dimension to an aquarium.
      References
      Arctos. (n.d.). Retrieved May 7, 2017, from http://arctos.database.museum/name/Planorbidae 
      Brown, D. S. (2001). Freshwater snails of the genus Gyraulus (Planorbidae) in Australia: taxa of the mainland. Molluscan Research, 21(1), 17-107. doi:10.1080/13235818.2001.10673736
       Image credit - @Paul Minett
       
      View full article
       
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Planorbidae make up a significant portion of aquaitic pulmonate gastropods. In Australia alone, there are over 20 species group taxa that have been described. Their common name, ramshorn snails, comes from the spiral shape of their shells, which looks like a ram’s horn.
      Ramshorn snails come in a wide range of colours, including red, brown and black, and they can even be shimmery and translucent in colour. Because of the unique design on their shells and their colour, they can be a welcomed addition to an aquarium, offering vibrant colour and interest. However, oftentimes, these snails inadvertently appear in aquariums, hitchhiking on the live plants and/or accessories that have been transferred from one tank to another. If there is enough food available, these snails can quickly breed and take over an aquarium; but, if they are properly maintained, they can be a welcomed addition, even if their presence was not intended. These snails eat food that is leftover in the water, dead plant material and algae, and as such, they can help to maintain the health and appearance of an aquarium.
      Maintaining Ramshorn Snails
      Whether you are interested in adding ramshorn snails to your aquarium or they have taken up residence unexpectedly and you decide that you want to keep them, it’s important to understand how to properly maintain them, which fortunately, is easy to do.
      They do will in aquariums of various sizes. They are also very adaptable, which means that they can do well in various types of water conditions, though they prefer water that is filtered. Additionally, they do best in tanks that do not undergo sudden changes in their condition. These snails consume algae and food remnants from fish, but they prefer to eat dying and dead plant matter that is shed from live plants. They will also eat dead fish, shrimp or other snails.
       
      Things to Avoid
      If you are interested in maintaining Ramshorn snails in your aquarium, you should be aware that there are species of fish that will eat them. The most common predators of Ramshorn snails include bettas, loaches and dwarf puffer fish. Assassin snails will also prey on these snails.
      Live Plants
      Some people claim that Ramshorn snails destroy their live plants, while others have reported they do not cause any issues. However, in most cases, they do very little damage to live plants, but if a large amount of them are present and there are delicate plants in the aquarium, such as Water Sprite and Cabomba, they can do damage.
      Behaviour
      Ramshorn snails are peaceful and non-aggressive. They will not cause issues with fish, shrimp or other types of snails in an aquarium. They spend their time moving about the tank eating and adding interesting colour, texture and dimension to an aquarium.
      References
      Arctos. (n.d.). Retrieved May 7, 2017, from http://arctos.database.museum/name/Planorbidae 
      Brown, D. S. (2001). Freshwater snails of the genus Gyraulus (Planorbidae) in Australia: taxa of the mainland. Molluscan Research, 21(1), 17-107. doi:10.1080/13235818.2001.10673736
       Image credit - @Paul Minett
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    • sdlTBfanUK
      Only day 2 but I have seen 6 of the new taiwan bee shrimp I got so that is looking hopeful, previously I saw no shrimp the next day after putting them in the tank so it is an improvement, but I am having to not get too excited and order more at this point??? All 15 may be alive but th tank is so densely planted I will never expect to see them all, and anyway they are new to the tank so would expect them to hide a lot more than when they are settled! Stunning shrimp though from an ebay sale, but too small and few to photo at this point, we will have to wait a while for those. I assume from this that maybe they were poisoned by something in the tank before but after a few years of water changes/running that  is not now a problem??? Tank still isn't green and lush like the other tanks though so I definitely wouldn't use that substrate again! Fingers crossed I am back with the Taiwan bee shrimp for good....... Simon  
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I am mainly buying the bloody mary shrimps, to top up red shrimp in that old tank but thought I may as well try some taiwan bee in the other tank as it must have been 2 years since I tried, and as I say, there have been wild type red cherry living in that tank! I am getting blacks mainly (and couldn't resist some blue bolt) as they won't be as visible to the fish as reds, but if it goes well I will get some red taiwan bee shrimp at some later date (probably next year though)! I must have fished out about 50 wild type red cherry so far from the old tank to make room for the new ones in that tank! If the taiwan bee work out, then I will have those wild type cherry to remove from that tank as well, there aren't that many though, I don't even feed those shrimps in that tank! I will post updates............ Simon
    • jayc
      Hope you have better luck with this lot.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I have ordered some bluebolt, black taiwan bee and black KK shrimp (5 of each) to see how this goes now, the parameters are perfect for Caridina shrimp and there have been wild type cherry shrimp living in that tank for about a year or more with no problems, so am going to give it another go! Decided to get a delivery done before winter sets in here, and also getting 20 bloody mary shrimp for the old tank so will try and fish out as many of  the wild types over the next few days to make room for the new red shrimps? I am getting this lot from ebay so will be interesting to see how that goes as it has been years since I used that for any shrimp? I prefer red taiwan bee but will just see how these black ones go first, obviously red will be much more visible to the fish? I guess I can rule out poisoning or disease as a tank issue as there have been shrimp living in the tank for a long time now! It still doesn't look nice and green though with this different substrate, and the fish may be an issue - hopefully the shrimp that are sent will be big enough to reduce the risk of that, the listing states they will be 15mm? Simon
    • jayc
      Otos really do like it in a big group. I had 10 in my 4ft tank once, and they would swim together. The problem with Otos is that, they compete with shrimp for the same food, ie. the biofilm on the surfaces of the tank. If you are okay with that and prepared to feed them regularly when the biofilm runs out, then Otos are great companions to shrimp. Of course they will both eat the same foods, so feeding both together is not difficult. Lot's of blanched veges like zucchinis, peas, carrots. 
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