Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hey guys, I’m really wanting to get freshwater crabs, and the only ones I’ve found are A. Lacustris and A. Laevis. I can only put them in a 110 L community tank for now, but may have another option in the future. The tank is stocked with a large school of ember tetras, some rocket killies, some endlers, some tangerine tiger shrimp, and a pair of apistogrammas. Rare aqua advised that A. Lacustris would likely be eaten by the apistos, so the obvious choice would be A. Laevis, because they’re larger... right? But I’m worried that they might predate upon my shrimp, so wanted to hear some advice and opinions from more people with experience keeping these crabs.

Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Crabclaw said:

so the obvious choice would be A. Laevis, because they’re larger... right?

I still wouldn't risk it. Apistos are aggressive towards crustaceans. The whole crab might not fit in it's big mouth, but their legs will. Apistos "could" take them apart piece by piece. 

Can you subdivide the 110L by adding a piece of perspex? It will need holes in it to let water flow through.

Otherwise a new tank for the crabs.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, jayc said:

Can you subdivide the 110L by adding a piece of perspex?

Doubt it. It’s more of a show tank. Big piece of driftwood runs through all of it.

 

11 minutes ago, jayc said:

Apistos are aggressive towards crustaceans. The whole crab might not fit in it's big mouth, but their legs will. Apistos "could" take them apart piece by piece

That doesn’t sound good. Guess I’ll be setting up a new tank if I want to keep crabs. Thanks jayc 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Hey folks!
      This thread is intended as a documentation (and space to ask questions of course) of @Frosty and my venture into caridina shrimp. 
      We’re starting off this weekend with 15-20 mischling shrimp (tibee x CBS), and maybe in a couple months if everything is going well we can add some TTS or KK or pandas or something. 
      The tank is a 4ft, with inert gravel and rocks, lots of moss, Java fern (crested and regular) and assorted crypts, and a couple big pieces of driftwood. 
      Current parameters are the following (please advise us if you think we should fix anything):
      22°, 6.8 pH (we might try ageing our water change water with peat moss, so with a couple water changes we’ll bring this down to 6.4-6.6), 3GH, 2KH, and 0 nitrates, nitrites and ammonia. 

      We’re thinking maybe to make it more interesting to the average onlooker, we might add a small school of chilli rasboras, but that’s hopefully going to be it for fish. 
      The tank is in direct sunlight, so there’s a possibility we’ll need ottos at some stage.

      I’ll update later with photos and our plans. Please let me know if you’ve got any advice!
      Cheers!
       
    • Patrick Gagnon
      By Patrick Gagnon
      I recently put in an order for 12 blue dream and 12 cherry shrimp. The shipping was delayed, Harrisburg PA distribution is terrible. Took over 9 days for them to arrive. 0 DOA. Nice! Anyway I've had them now for I'd say 2 weeks. One already is pregnant! And I recently found a guest staying. I have copepods all over, I heard they are fine. I'm not sure what this is. Looks to have antennas, like a snail or something.

    • Rare Aqua
      By Rare Aqua
      The in depth guide to keeping as well as breeding Amarinus lacustris by Hervey Doerr-Rolley
       
      Overview
      The aim of this article is to educate and warn people of the mistakes I made and how I was successful with breeding and keeping this species. I published an article about this species several years ago so thought it was time for an updated guide for anyone wanting to keep and breed this species. All my knowledge about this species has been developed over the 4 years I've kept this species as well as the many scientific articles I've studied, I first kept this species when I was 15 and now 19, my colony is still going strongly. Currently studying a bachelor of Marine science. Firstly I'd like to point out this species does not have a larval cycle, it is a far too common misconception people have. I believe this thought is derived from their much larger cousin the Amarinus laevis and the Thai micro crab, Limnopilos naiyanetri. Amarinus lacustris have fully formed offspring, meaning their offspring are essentially miniature adults once hatched from their egg. Some points of interest about this species, there are 8 instars before their pubertal moult. Females up to two moults before their pubertal moult can copulate and store spermatozoon, once she reaches the pubertal moult she can then impregnate herself without the need of copulation. The stored spermatozoon can then be used up to 15 separate brood cycles (15 clutches of eggs). Adult females can carry up to *35 eggs (anecdotal) and take around 25-30 days at 15 degrees Celsius to hatch as fully formed offspring. 
       
      Water chemistry
      A. lacustris have a strong preference for hard water, I keep and breed mine in;
      pH: 8-8.2
      Ammonia:0ppm
      Nitrate:0ppm
      Nitrite:0ppm
      KH:125ppm 
      *25% water changes are done weekly*
       
      Breeding and Husbandry 
      Key points for their care;
      Gravel substrate - fine pea gravel is best.
      Air pump sponge filters are essential as this provides cleaner water as well as a feeding ground for the offspring as well as adults.
      Mulm and moss are essential.
      A good rule of thumb from my experience is 500ml of aquarium space per baby-sub adult, and then 1L per adult crab, this allows for less aggression from male to male behavior. It is up to you but the less stocking density the better due to the aggression of breeding from males, keep in mind this aggression is only towards other males however females that are being copulated with may sustain serious injuries if too many males are kept together. The best ratios are two males to 8 females. When a female sheds she releases hormones into the water column just like shrimp, if any of you are familiar with breeding shrimp you can note this by the erratic and fast speeds the males zoom around the aquarium searching for the female, this is the same case with A. lacustris except the swimming, rather they crawl quickly around the aquarium in search for the female to copulate with. Once the male finds the female he will grasp the female tightly underside to underside in a 'hug' embrace, he will then fertilize the female. This embrace can last minutes or hours depending on the male. Eggs will soon become visible and as described above hatch within 25-30 days*. This species is a cold water crustacean so you must remember that, breeding will cease if the temperature goes above 22 Celsius. Keep them in a mature mulm filled aquarium with leaf litter (I use oak leaves) with plenty of hiding spots and moss, a 8pH and 15 Celsius and before you know it you will have berried females.
       
      Feeding
       
      Surprisingly my A. lacustris do not eat commercial foods, I feed mine cultured white worms which are perfect as they grow to a max size of 3cm and survive underwater for several days. I also add snails to my aquarium as the crabs feed on their feces. Funnily enough baby crabs will eat the white worms too once they are 2 instars old, so it is not uncommon to see a 2mm baby crab hanging on to a 2cm long white worm! I feed my crabs every 3 days and small amounts of the worms to reduce water quality issues.
       
      Common questions I am asked 
       
      As I was the first person in Australia and the world to raise fully tank raised F2 offspring i have come across many commonly asked questions. "can I get these crabs in country x?" so far you can legally only get these crabs in their native geographical regions, however once these crabs are even more commonly bred their popularity over the Thai micro crab will be clearly abundant simply due to their ease of breeding which you know, therefore I wouldn't be surprised if these hit the international market once they're being large scale bred. "Do you have any for sale?" when I have crabs for sale I have a waiting list, If you want to ask questions or be on the waiting list email me: zebradanio88@hotmail.com. "can these go with fish x?" if the fish is 4cm or less they are fine generally, my opinion is keep the species only or with shrimp which leads to the next question "are the shrimp safe" and yes they are, however they are naturally scavengers so if you have dead or sick shrimp they will eat them, if your shrimp are healthy they will not predate on them. "how long do they live for?" they live for around 2-3 years+. "why are all my crabs dying" this question is addressed below; 
       
      Major issue that needs to be addressed 
       
      Since my first sales of A. lacustris I suddenly saw a spike of ads for them in Australia, unfortunately I could tell the individuals for sale were all wild caught and at best had only lived in an aquarium for a couple weeks of their life. This then would result in people encouraging the decimation and local extinction of the species in our waterways due to peoples greed of wanting to make a quick buck off this amazing native species. The crabs that I breed and sell are all aquarium raised individuals ONLY, I have put time, money and effort into the crabs I breed to ensure I do not impact the wild populations and offer aquarium suited specimens for people wanting to keep them. I have had a plethora of emails from people asking me why crabs they had sourced outside of my individuals had suddenly died off, this is simply due to the fact these crabs have not been aquarium raised and selectively bred for years like mine have. I find it horrendous that people think it is okay to collect many wild individuals to then sell knowing full well they will die within around a 3 month period just for their sake to make some 'fast' money. So please before you buy from a seller of these crabs ask as many questions as you can to find out how many generations old your crabs are and how long they've been bred for etc. If they cannot supply a high amount of detail or simply quote my articles about them do not buy from that seller. Do not support poachers for your aquarium! This applies with all species, worldwide.
       
      Thank you for reading my article,
      again if you have any questions feel free to email me as I'm always happy to help out ethical keepers and potential breeders of this species.
       
      Author and credits: Hervey Doerr-Rolley

      View full article
    • Rare Aqua
      By Rare Aqua
      The in depth guide to keeping as well as breeding Amarinus lacustris by Hervey Doerr-Rolley
       
      Overview
      The aim of this article is to educate and warn people of the mistakes I made and how I was successful with breeding and keeping this species. I published an article about this species several years ago so thought it was time for an updated guide for anyone wanting to keep and breed this species. All my knowledge about this species has been developed over the 4 years I've kept this species as well as the many scientific articles I've studied, I first kept this species when I was 15 and now 19, my colony is still going strongly. Currently studying a bachelor of Marine science. Firstly I'd like to point out this species does not have a larval cycle, it is a far too common misconception people have. I believe this thought is derived from their much larger cousin the Amarinus laevis and the Thai micro crab, Limnopilos naiyanetri. Amarinus lacustris have fully formed offspring, meaning their offspring are essentially miniature adults once hatched from their egg. Some points of interest about this species, there are 8 instars before their pubertal moult. Females up to two moults before their pubertal moult can copulate and store spermatozoon, once she reaches the pubertal moult she can then impregnate herself without the need of copulation. The stored spermatozoon can then be used up to 15 separate brood cycles (15 clutches of eggs). Adult females can carry up to *35 eggs (anecdotal) and take around 25-30 days at 15 degrees Celsius to hatch as fully formed offspring. 
       
      Water chemistry
      A. lacustris have a strong preference for hard water, I keep and breed mine in;
      pH: 8-8.2
      Ammonia:0ppm
      Nitrate:0ppm
      Nitrite:0ppm
      KH:125ppm 
      *25% water changes are done weekly*
       
      Breeding and Husbandry 
      Key points for their care;
      Gravel substrate - fine pea gravel is best.
      Air pump sponge filters are essential as this provides cleaner water as well as a feeding ground for the offspring as well as adults.
      Mulm and moss are essential.
      A good rule of thumb from my experience is 500ml of aquarium space per baby-sub adult, and then 1L per adult crab, this allows for less aggression from male to male behavior. It is up to you but the less stocking density the better due to the aggression of breeding from males, keep in mind this aggression is only towards other males however females that are being copulated with may sustain serious injuries if too many males are kept together. The best ratios are two males to 8 females. When a female sheds she releases hormones into the water column just like shrimp, if any of you are familiar with breeding shrimp you can note this by the erratic and fast speeds the males zoom around the aquarium searching for the female, this is the same case with A. lacustris except the swimming, rather they crawl quickly around the aquarium in search for the female to copulate with. Once the male finds the female he will grasp the female tightly underside to underside in a 'hug' embrace, he will then fertilize the female. This embrace can last minutes or hours depending on the male. Eggs will soon become visible and as described above hatch within 25-30 days*. This species is a cold water crustacean so you must remember that, breeding will cease if the temperature goes above 22 Celsius. Keep them in a mature mulm filled aquarium with leaf litter (I use oak leaves) with plenty of hiding spots and moss, a 8pH and 15 Celsius and before you know it you will have berried females.
       
      Feeding
       
      Surprisingly my A. lacustris do not eat commercial foods, I feed mine cultured white worms which are perfect as they grow to a max size of 3cm and survive underwater for several days. I also add snails to my aquarium as the crabs feed on their feces. Funnily enough baby crabs will eat the white worms too once they are 2 instars old, so it is not uncommon to see a 2mm baby crab hanging on to a 2cm long white worm! I feed my crabs every 3 days and small amounts of the worms to reduce water quality issues.
       
      Common questions I am asked 
       
      As I was the first person in Australia and the world to raise fully tank raised F2 offspring i have come across many commonly asked questions. "can I get these crabs in country x?" so far you can legally only get these crabs in their native geographical regions, however once these crabs are even more commonly bred their popularity over the Thai micro crab will be clearly abundant simply due to their ease of breeding which you know, therefore I wouldn't be surprised if these hit the international market once they're being large scale bred. "Do you have any for sale?" when I have crabs for sale I have a waiting list, If you want to ask questions or be on the waiting list email me: zebradanio88@hotmail.com. "can these go with fish x?" if the fish is 4cm or less they are fine generally, my opinion is keep the species only or with shrimp which leads to the next question "are the shrimp safe" and yes they are, however they are naturally scavengers so if you have dead or sick shrimp they will eat them, if your shrimp are healthy they will not predate on them. "how long do they live for?" they live for around 2-3 years+. "why are all my crabs dying" this question is addressed below; 
       
      Major issue that needs to be addressed 
       
      Since my first sales of A. lacustris I suddenly saw a spike of ads for them in Australia, unfortunately I could tell the individuals for sale were all wild caught and at best had only lived in an aquarium for a couple weeks of their life. This then would result in people encouraging the decimation and local extinction of the species in our waterways due to peoples greed of wanting to make a quick buck off this amazing native species. The crabs that I breed and sell are all aquarium raised individuals ONLY, I have put time, money and effort into the crabs I breed to ensure I do not impact the wild populations and offer aquarium suited specimens for people wanting to keep them. I have had a plethora of emails from people asking me why crabs they had sourced outside of my individuals had suddenly died off, this is simply due to the fact these crabs have not been aquarium raised and selectively bred for years like mine have. I find it horrendous that people think it is okay to collect many wild individuals to then sell knowing full well they will die within around a 3 month period just for their sake to make some 'fast' money. So please before you buy from a seller of these crabs ask as many questions as you can to find out how many generations old your crabs are and how long they've been bred for etc. If they cannot supply a high amount of detail or simply quote my articles about them do not buy from that seller. Do not support poachers for your aquarium! This applies with all species, worldwide.
       
      Thank you for reading my article,
      again if you have any questions feel free to email me as I'm always happy to help out ethical keepers and potential breeders of this species.
       
      Author and credits: Hervey Doerr-Rolley
    • Adam Bomb
      By Adam Bomb
      Hello everyone! 
      My area of Michigan (48065) seems to be a black hole for shrimp enthusiasts, and my hope was to uncover folks I can buy shrimp (and hopefully moss) from locally. Since the pandemic has paused all face-to-face meetings for local clubs until further notice, it's been rough (and I can't imagine paying online retail ridiculous prices for shipped shrimp)!
      Since we only have the "City" field (for location) on profiles, is there a better way to find local people? I'd love any help you can offer. 
  • Join Our Community!

    Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

  • Must Read SKF Articles

  • Posts

    • sdlTBfanUK
      I have 3 tanks at the moment, Tank 1 - bloody mary shrim with neon and ember tetras, though 90% of the shrimp are wild type now! Tank 2 - the old taiwan bee shrimp tank, has 11 mosquito rasbora and 1 killie with wild type cherry shrimp, I have just done the maintenance on that tank and there are definitely shrimp still doing well (I don't feed shrimp in there) but they are clear or brown so VERY difficult to spot! I tested this tank last week and parameters were ideal for taiwan bee (PH6, TDS 140, KH 0-1, GH 5-6 (a bit high)) as it has been since set up. Tank 3 - male betta with wild cherry shrimp, again just done that tank and there are shrimp doing well in there but again, I can ony see them with a strong light and magnifying glass due to their lack of colour. I am looking at maybe just stocking up before winter so may get a job lot of bloody mary shrimp for tank 1 (and discard lots of wilds) and have a  final try with the taiwan bee as the tank 2 is at the moment. The parameters are perfect but the plants are still not nice and green with this substrate, as they were before with the other substrate but obviously shrimp are living in there, albeit not ones I wanted, so I can rule out disease and poisoning. As you say, the taiwan bee are much easier to see so may be preyed on by the fish so I won't buy expensive ones (ebay probably) or a large quantity (if I get any at all of course, though it is now or wait until next year). It would be the last lot I try until the fish die off and the tank is reset with the other substrate! Simon
    • Crabby
      So do you have any Taiwan bees going right now Simon? Or just the red cherries/wilds? I forget some of the stuff that you and jayc have.  Depending on the type you get, they could be targeted a lot more than your wilds are currently. Also I’m not too sure how the parameters would work, for neocaridina and taiwan bees. But I’d be very interested to see what comes of it if you try.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      I agree with  crabby, having fish in a tank tends to draw the eye away from the shrimp, and of course the shrimp won't be out and about quite so much! If you can resist the urge to get fish (for now at least) except a few ottocinclus (they don't move that much) that would be best and give your shrimp colony a better chance of growing quicker, but obviously the final decision will be yours! I have fish (tetra) in my oldest tank mainly as that tank is 5 or 6 feet from where I normally sit so wanted something I could see from a distance. I have rasbora and killie in the specialised shrimp tank because I was having difficulty with shrimp in that tank anyway and covid started so I quickly grabbed some fish before lockdown etc so there would be something in that tank - I am thinking I may try and get some taiwan bee shrimmp for that tank next week, before winter gets here, though whether it will work tankwise or with the fish???????????????   Simon
    • Crabby
      I’ve never kept shrimp with tetras, so I can’t speak from experience on that one, but I can say that I’ve found shrimp are more enjoyable without fish in the tank (through recent exploration). Maybe an Ottocinclus or two (or three even) could be an unobtrusive addition? They’re one of the best ‘suckers’ out there. Very cute too.
    • Hammy
      Thanks for the advice yeah everything is going good I’ve got 7 shrimp left one that’s carrying eggs and another that got a yellow patch just behind her saddle so I’m thinking that she’s going to produce eggs soon. Sadly no the cherry coloured one died absolutely no idea as to why it was fine swimming about eating when I went to bed and in the morning it was dead. The baths worked I think I’ve not seen any signs to say otherwise and I give them a good check every day so soon as I see anything I can hopefully sort it. 
×
×
  • Create New...