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    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Hey folks!
      So I got myself a little 5 gallon (20L) recently (it was free!) to use for quarantine. I’m going to use it to qt some cory cats and maybe some tetras or gouramis for my community tank. The thing is, I’ve got it set up really nicely in my room and I want to have it actually stocked. I definitely don’t want a betta, but I found some super cute guppies on gumtree (Wild Thai Orchid) that I can never find locally. How many guppies do u think I could get in the tank?? The seller only has 4 pairs, so is selling in pairs but not trios, so that could have an affect on the amount. I also plan on adding shrimp, either of a neo or caridina variety, or native - like dae or chameleons. 
      So my questions are: how many guppies could go in the tank (assuming they breed and I keep the babies in with them for about a month each time), could I fit in anything else (with a pair or 4), like a couple of chilli rasboras or rocket killies, and will the shrimps be enough for a cleanup crew, or should I add an Otto or something?
      Cheers!
    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Hey everyone,
      I was recently (meaning today) given the opportunity to set up a breeding tank for some native inverts (or some harder to breed fish I guess, but I want to go for shrimp) in a fishroom I help out in. I've been trying to decide what native shrimp I want to try breeding, but then I remembered that it's not as simple as exotics. Can I get some input from the 'experts' (@Grubs, @NoGi, @Baccus, @fishmosy, @jayc of course, I know most of you aren't very active anymore, but I would appreciate your help if you see this message) on what native invert you guys think is easiest to breed (for a semi-noob who hasn't kept natives before). I can set it up as brackish I think, we have an archer fish tank there and are setting up a saltwater as well so should have access to those tools and materials.  
      Cheers!
    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Hey guys, I thought I’d just make a single topic for my community tank, so I stop running around in other chats asking the same questions 😁. I’m going thru a big change in the tank at the moment, so will likely update in the morning with photos once the cloudiness is gone. Be prepared for a possibly very long message about a 10 hour process 😂.
      Cheerio!
    • Crabby
      By Crabby
      Hey guys, just found an add for this website showcasing a cool-lookin native algae eating shrimp.
      https://algaeeatingshrimp.com.au/products/australian-algae-eating-shrimp
      Anyone heard of these before or own any? My interest was peaked by the claim that they eat hair-type algae, as I have some on my crypts and lace fern that I cannot remove. And for a price of $4 ea, and super easy parameters, they sound pretty doable! 
      Tell me more oh great SKFians! 😁
      (or feel free to point me towards an already existing page)
      post-note: have you/do you keep these grubs? Seems like your sort of thing.
    • Linden
      By Linden
      Hello. I've written the following based on my own time scouring the internet and then personal experiences with my mud crab Gaston.      Mud crab aquarium care.    Tank setup: Minumim 4ft aquarium. A 4x2 ft much better.  Like with turtles, larger footprint is important. Not so much how tall the tank is. Seriously big crabs. Be open to having a 6ft aquarium if you plan on risking tank mates (other than glass shrimp, snails and tiny fish). Unless your in Western Australia, you'll get Scylla serrata aka Green mud crab (not named green for being green. Can be brown and blue also). They can grow up to 30cms and 2.5kgs with 20cm claws.   Have a cycled aquarium with brackish water about 1.006-1.010 SG. Heated 19-25°c. PH around 7 or higher. Harder water is important. Crushed coral can help balance out soft tap water and the use of driftwood. Breaking up some cuttlefish bone in the water column is important. Calcium for shell development. They are from estuaries. So have a great tolerance for temperature and salinity fluctuations.   Decent filtration is a must as they are exceptionally messy eaters. I recommend a sump. The crabs are very strong and can snap heaters, damage power cables and move tubing. So a sump for the hygrometer and heater helps, with the benefit of the overflows and returns being secure. Also clamps to hold parts in place. Pvc tubing can be used to protect power cables and keep equipment protected.   The lid needs to be very secure. With only small gaps and also weighted down. The crabs are strong and can easily lift glass. Some additional glass pieces on the lid to keep it down is recommended.     The crabs will want to get their mouths above the water line periodically. So don't fully fill the aquarium. About 20cm deep. Deeper depending on if you have driftwood or rock climbing areas so it can still reach above water line. Note: ensure all rocks and driftwood are very securely and purposefully positioned. Remember they are very strong and can move unsecured rocks and driftwood. Poorly placed rocks could be moved and break the tank. Using larger rocks and wood is safer than easier to move small pieces.   Sand as a substrate is best. 6cm or so deep. Mixed with some crushed coral and aesthetic gravel. They sift through sand for scraps plus it will help fill cracks between rocks n such to secure them even more.   They will eat plants. So not a great aesthetic addition.     Don't put strong lighting on the tank. The crabs like to hide. Plus they'll grow algae over their carapace under too strong and or long exposure. Glass shrimp will help keep this down.    Aquiring:  Can be bought from a fish market. Sold as live food. About $50 per kilo. A standard mud crab will be about 0.8-1.4kgs. Google how to pic a healthy mudcrab. You want to select the healthiest male you can get (not the biggest). Note. They'll all be male.  Transport in Styrofoam box or esky with a little ice. They'll wrap it in newspaper.   When home. Unpack it (keep the claw string on) then move it into a large container or tank with no water for about an hour as they 'defrost'. Remove the claw holding string as you move into their aquarium. Have a friend around to help with lid for safety reasons.    Feeding:  They are scavengers and eat a wide variety of foods. They will make a big mess when they do, so some glass shrimp, Malaysian trumpet snails and a few tiny fish are beneficial for cleaning up the shower of food particles.   My favourite foods to feed are small whole cooked tiger prawns and marinara mix from the deli. Some white fish cut into pieces then frozen. Repashy with added calcium (powdered egg shells or cuttlefish bones). Make big skeets in flat zip lock bags and freeze. Snap off a piece for feeding.     Can also feed worms, clams, scollops, crab pieces, garden snails, plant matter (like excess Elodea from another tank).  A varied diet is important. But most of all is getting plenty of calcium in their diet. The repashy +calcium or a similar diy mix with agar agar, calcium, seafood and added vegetables is gold.     It might not take to eating well initially. I recommend using long planting tweezers. Carefully. Don't want them to grab the tweezers.   You can train them onto eating by attaching a piece of meat or prawn to some cotton string. Jerk it around infront of him until he goes for it. Might take a few tries. Don't leave large pieces of uneaten food in the tank to spoil. Be very careful putting hands into the tank. They can go from slow to very fast moving in an instant.  Here's my Gaston. 

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    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry to hear you are having a problem with one tank. Regarding the breeding stopping, that may be as it is winter with the taiwan bee shrimp where you are so I wouldn't worry about that unduly unless it carries on after winter? It onl seems to happen with Taiwan bees and I had this happen and have seen you tube videos and heard it happens with others (not everyone though oddly). The main problem tank, I can't see anything that looks a problem at first glance and as you are running other tanks the same way it must be something specific to the tank. Are all the tanks kept together in the same area? Have you put anything wood/new etc new in the tank that may have been contaminated with pesticides that is slowly poisoning the tank etc? Anything you can list as tank specific may help give us a clue. Are the vegetables you feed ORGANIC (though if you use the same for all the tanks it is unlikely to be that)? The simptoms do sound as though it may be some kind of toxic poisoning! The picture is a lovely shrimp and I can't see anything obviously wrong with it. I had a similar experience with my last shrimp tank so I know how frustrating it can be to pin point the problem! Simon
    • Myola
      For about 2 months now I've been losing one or two of my CRS every day. Tank has been running for about a year and initially everything was normal and they were breeding well. Then I started noticing the odd unexplained death, then it became more frequent, now it's every day. Parameters are: pH 5.5, GH 4, KH 0-1, Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, Nitrate 5, TDS 120 Temp 22C. What's left of the colony are fed 2 - 3 times a week on a variety of quality foods including blanched zucchini, blanched mulberry leaves, HWA bacterium, frozen bloodworm and a few foods I've bought from breeders who make their own. They only get a tiny amount and it's usually gone within a couple of hours. Tank maintenance includes once weekly 10% water changes and the water I use is rainwater that I run through the RO and remineralised with GH+ liquid. I have two other caridina tanks - one with tang tigers who are breeding like mad. I never have deaths in that tank and it's got almost the same parameters just the GH is 5 instead of 4. The other tank is for blue bolts, mosuras, pandas and shadow pandas. I don't lose any shrimp in that tank either, BUT they aren't breeding. I think I'll have to start another thread for that issue though. I'm careful to clean any equipment used in one tank before I use it in another so that I'm not cross-contaminating. The shrimp seem perfectly normal until they fall over and die. They did stop breeding a couple of months ago so my colony is getting smaller by the day. The tank has the usual shrimpy stuff - IAL, alder cones, cholla wood. Substrate is Amazonia II. Below is a photo of one of today's victims. I have a video of it in the throes of dying too, but can't seem to upload it. It just shows the shrimp on its back and its little legs kind of spasming. Is anyone able give me any idea what my shrimp are succumbing to? Muscular necrosis perhaps? Thanks in advance.
    • chopstxnrice
      Thanks everyone for the replies! Yes I just started using remineralization about a week ago since I thought maybe the shrimp weren't getting the minerals they need and thus were dying. For the first month or so, I was using half deionized water half tap water. I checked my DI water and it's pH 7 kh 0 gh maybe 1. Perhaps I was shocking my shrimp with water changes. I'm going to try replacing my current water with pure DI water ~20% at a time and recheck. Is it possible something in my tank is causing high gh and pH?  I do have a zero water filter, but the filters are so expensive 🤣 
    • Crabby
      I think they mentioned they were already using distilled water though. I think in that case it's just too much remineralisation.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Any clear container or an old jam jar would do.  It is very difficult to see anything when they are out of the tank as all the legs etc will be clamped to the body, and as crabby states they will be extra stressed! Simon
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